Panasonic’s New WV-ASM970 & WV-ASC970 Software Provides An All-inclusive, Hybrid Security Solution
Panasonic’s New WV-ASM970 & WV-ASC970 Software Provides An All-inclusive, Hybrid Security Solution

The increasing trend in switching from analog to IP security solutions has inspired Panasonic System Networks Europe to develop and present the new WV-ASC970 IP matrix server software and the WV-ASM970 IP control software to allow flexible, all-inclusive and hybrid security solutions. WV-ASC970 IP matrix client software The WV-ASC970 software allows a server PC to integrate multiple network components into one easy-to-manage flow of data. Allowing up to 64 recorders, 64 decoders and 2048 analog and IP cameras to be registered, security professionals have available a huge amount of information from the monitoring terminal. Panasonic's WV-ASC970 software is designed to ensure total cost of ownership is minimised by extending the life of Panasonic analog cameras alongside new IP technology - convergence rather than replacement. Hosting hybrid solution such as these smoothes the transition process between analog and IP as well as making varying network peripherals available from the user interface, including WV-ASC970 software. The WV-ASC970 allows both camera viewing and camera control for up to 512 individual user registrations with 64 simultaneous users supported at once, enabling collective security and remote monitoring. WV-ASM970 IP control software The WV-ASM970 client software is installed to each client PC, which enhances operation and monitoring of the full security network. Multi-monitor function enables simultaneous use of the Operation Screen and Monitoring Screen for comprehensive supervision. Other viewing options allow up to 30 IP cameras to be displayed in a 16 split screen format in MPEG-4, 2mbps mode whilst providing full location information and maintaining optimized network usage. In addition Automated Status Change uses the monitor to display a location map when an alarm is triggered to ensure security professionals can locate and action emergency response.  In summary WV-ASC970 IP matrix server software and the WV-ASM970 IP matrix client control software are designed to smooth the transition from Analog to IP, enhance system scalability plus extend the life of existing systems.  This makes specifying Panasonic the best choice to reduce costs and improve protection of personnel and property.

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Video Surveillance software - Expert commentary

How To Build An Insider Threat Program
How To Build An Insider Threat Program

Insider threat programs started with counter-espionage cases in the government. Today, insider threat programs have become a more common practice in all industries, as companies understand the risks associated with not having one. To build a program, you must first understand what an insider threat is. An insider threat is an employee, contractor, visitor or other insider who have been granted physical or logical access to a company that can cause extensive damage. Damage ranges from emotional or physical injury, to personnel, financial and reputational loss to data loss/manipulation or destruction of assets. Financial and confidential information While malicious insiders only make up 22% of the threats, they have the most impact on an organization Most threats are derived from the accidental insider. For example, it’s the person who is working on a competitive sales pitch on an airplane and is plugging in financial and confidential information. They are working hard, yet their company’s information is exposed to everyone around them. Another type of insider, the compromised insider, is the person who accidentally downloaded malware when clicking on a fake, urgent email, exposing their information. Malicious insiders cause the greatest concerns. These are the rogue employees who may feel threatened. They may turn violent or take action to damage the company. Or you have the criminal actor employees who are truly malicious and have been hired or bribed by another company to gather intel. Their goal is to gather data and assets to cause damage for a specific purpose. While malicious insiders only make up 22% of the threats, they have the most impact on an organization. They can cause brand and financial damage, along with physical and mental damage. Insider threat program Once you determine you need an insider threat program, you need to build a business case and support it with requirements. Depending on your industry, you can start with regulatory requirements such as HIPAA, NERC CIP, PCI, etc. Talk to your regulator and get their input. Everyone needs to be onboard, understand the intricacies of enacting a program Next, get a top to bottom risk assessment to learn your organization’s risks. A risk assessment will help you prioritize your risks and provide recommendations about what you need to include in your program. Begin by meeting with senior leadership, including your CEO to discuss expectations. Creating an insider threat program will change the company culture, and the CEO must understand the gravity of his/her decision before moving forward. Everyone needs to be onboard, understand the intricacies of enacting a program and support it before its implemented. Determining the level of monitoring The size and complexity of your company will determine the type of program needed. One size does not fit all. It will determine what technologies are required and how much personnel is needed to execute the program. The company must determine what level of monitoring is needed to meet their goals. After the leadership team decides, form a steering committee that includes someone from legal, HR and IT. Other departments can join as necessary. This team sets up the structure, lays out the plan, determines the budget and what type of technologies are needed. For small companies, the best value is education. Educate your employees about the program, build the culture and promote awareness. Teach employees about the behaviors you are looking for and how to report them. Behavioral analysis software Every company is different and you need to determine what will gain employee support The steering committee will need to decide what is out of scope. Every company is different and you need to determine what will gain employee support. The tools put in place cannot monitor employee productivity (web surfing). That is out of scope and will disrupt the company culture. What technology does your organization need to detect insider threats? Organizations need software solutions that monitor, aggregate and analyze data to identify potential threats. Behavioral analysis software looks at patterns of behavior and identifies anomalies. Use business intelligence/data analytics solutions to solve this challenge. This solution learns the normal behavior of people and notifies security staff when behavior changes. This is done by setting a set risk score. Once the score crosses a determined threshold, an alert is triggered. Case and incident management tools Predictive analytics technology reviews behaviors and identifies sensitive areas of companies (pharmacies, server rooms) or files (HR, finance, development). If it sees anomalous behavior, it can predict behaviours. It can determine if someone is going to take data. It helps companies take steps to get ahead of bad behavior. If an employee sends hostile emails, they are picked up and an alert is triggered User sentiment detection software can work in real time. If an employee sends hostile emails, they are picked up and an alert is triggered. The SOC and HR are notified and security dispatched. Depending on how a company has this process set-up, it could potentially save lives. Now that your organization has all this data, how do you pull it together? Case and incident management tools can pool data points and create threat dashboards. Cyber detection system with access control An integrated security system is recommended to be successful. It will eliminate bubbles and share data to see real-time patterns. If HR, security and compliance departments are doing investigations, they can consolidate systems into the same tool to have better data aggregation. Companies can link their IT/cyber detection system with access control. Deploying a true, integrated, open system provides a better insider threat program. Big companies should invest in trained counterintelligence investigators to operate the program. They can help identify the sensitive areas, identify who the people are that have the most access to them, or are in a position to do the greatest amount of harm to the company and who to put mitigation plans around to protect them. They also run the investigations. Potential risky behavior Using the right technology along with thorough processes will result in a successful program You need to detect which individuals are interacting with information systems that pose the greatest potential risk. You need to rapidly and thoroughly understand the user’s potential risky behavior and the context around it. Context is important. You need to decide what to investigate and make it clear to employees. Otherwise you will create a negative culture at your company. Develop a security-aware culture. Involve the crowd. Get an app so if someone sees something they can say something. IT should not run the insider threat program. IT is the most privileged department in an organization. If something goes wrong with an IT person, they have the most ability to do harm and cover their tracks. They need to be an important partner, but don’t let them have ownership and don’t let their administrators have access. Educating your employees and creating a positive culture around an insider threat program takes time and patience. Using the right technology along with thorough processes will result in a successful program. It’s okay to start small and build.

The Benefits Of An Integrated Security System
The Benefits Of An Integrated Security System

Today, the world is connected like never before. Your watch is connected to your phone, which is connected to your tablet and so on. As we’ve begun to embrace this ‘smart’ lifestyle, what we’re really embracing is the integration of systems. Why do we connect our devices? The simplest answer is that it makes life easier. But, if that’s the case, why stop at our own personal devices? Connection, when applied to a business’ operations, is no different: it lowers effort and expedites decision making. Integrating security systems Systems integration takes the idea of connected devices and applies it to an enterprise Systems integration takes the idea of connected devices and applies it to an enterprise, bringing disparate subcomponents into a single ecosystem. This could mean adding a new, overarching system to pull and collect data from existing subsystems, or adapting an existing system to serve as a data collection hub. Regardless of the method, the purpose is to create a single, unified view. Ultimately, it’s about simplifying processes, gaining actionable insights into operations and facilitating efficient decision-making. Although integration is becoming the new norm in other areas of life, businesses often opt out of integrating security systems because of misconceptions about the time and resources required to successfully make the change. So, instead of a streamlined operation, the various security systems and devices are siloed, not communicating with each other and typically being run by different teams within an organization. Time-Intensive process When systems are not integrated, companies face a wide range of risks driven by a lack of transparency and information sharing, including actual loss of property or assets. For example, a team in charge of access control is alerted to a door being opened in the middle of the night but can’t see what exactly is taking place through video surveillance. Without integrated systems they have no way of knowing if it was a burglar, an equipment malfunction or a gust of wind. Without integration between systems and teams, the ability to quickly put the right pieces in front of decision makers is missing. Instead, the team would have to go back and manually look for footage that corresponds with the time a door was open to figure out which door it was, who opened it and what happened after, which can be a time-intensive process. Integrating access control and surveillance systems Theft and vandalism occur quickly, meaning systems and users must work faster in order to prevent it This slowed response time adds risk to the system. Theft and vandalism occur quickly, meaning systems and users must work faster in order to prevent it. Security systems can do more than communicate that theft or vandalism occurred. Properly integrated, these systems alert users of pre-incident indicators before an event happens or deter events altogether. This gives teams and decision makers more time to make effective decisions. Integrating access control and surveillance systems allows for a more proactive approach. If a door is opened when it’s not supposed to be, an integrated system enables users to quickly see what door was opened, who opened it and make a quick decision. Integrated solutions are more effective, more efficient and help drive cost-saving decisions. Ideally, companies should establish integrated solutions from the start of operations. This allows companies to anticipate problems and adjust accordingly instead of reacting after an incident has occurred. Security camera system Although starting from the beginning is the best way to ensure comprehensive security, many companies have existing security systems, requiring integration and implementation to bring them together. Typically, companies with established security systems worry about the impact to infrastructure requirements. Is additional infrastructure necessary? How and where should it be added? What financial or human resources are required? These concerns drive a mentality that the benefits gained from an integrated solution aren’t worth the costs of implementation. Thankfully, this is becoming less of a problem as security providers, like Twenty20™ Solutions, work to offer adaptable solutions. With flexible options, operators don’t worry about adding or replacing infrastructure to align with a provider’s model. This allows users to monitor camera footage and gate traffic from one system If a company has an existing security camera system, but identifies a need for access control, a modern integrated solution provider can supply the gates for access points and equip the gates and cameras with the technology to connect the two. This allows users to monitor camera footage and gate traffic from one system. This model also spares operators additional costs by using a sole vendor for supplemental needs. Overall management of security While a single, unified system is beneficial for cost saving, it can also help the overall management of security. The ability to view all operating systems in one dashboard allows security personnel to manage a site from any location, reducing the expense and effort required to manage a system. The mobile world today means security directors no longer need to be in a centralized operations center to see alerts and make decisions. This simplifies processes by allowing users to quickly see an alert, pull up a camera, delete a user or check an access log from a phone. Modern networks are secure and accessible to those with permissions, without requiring those users to be physically present. Consolidating security systems is the first step companies can take toward streamlining work, information and costs. The next step is integrating all sites, both remote and on-grid. Energy and communication technology The integration of sites and systems turns mountains of data and information into actionable intelligence Traditional methods demanded two systems: one for on-grid facilities and another for off-grid locations. With advancements in energy and communication technology, the need for multiple systems is gone. Data from remote sites can be safely and securely fed into an existing system. These remote locations may gather, distribute and manage data in a different manner than a connected system due to the cost of transmission via remote connections (i.e., cellular or satellite connection). The end result, however, is a consistent and holistic view of operations for the decision maker. The integration of sites and systems turns mountains of data and information into actionable intelligence. With connected devices monitoring occurrences at individual sites, as well as events across locations, the data tells a story that is unhindered by operational silos or physical space. Identifying patterns and trends Instead of providing 10 hours-worth of footage that may or may not be relevant, system analytics can provide users with the specific set of information they need. Incidents once discarded as ‘one-off’ events can now be analyzed and data-mapped to identify patterns and trends, directing future resources to the most critical areas first. Consumers are increasingly expecting everything they need to be right where they need it – and businesses are right behind them. The current generation of security professionals are increasingly expecting the simplicity of their everyday personal tasks to be mirrored in enterprise systems, which means giving them the ability to see what matters in one place. A unified system can provide just that, a single view to help simplify processes, promote cost saving and accelerate decision making.

How Artificial Intelligence And Analytics Enhance Security And Performance
How Artificial Intelligence And Analytics Enhance Security And Performance

Artificial intelligence (AI) is improving everyday solutions, driving efficiency in ways we never imagined possible. From self-driving cars to intelligent analytics, the far-reaching impacts of Deep Learning-based technology empower human operators to achieve results more effectively while investing fewer resources and less time. By introducing AI, solutions are not merely powered by data, but they also generate valuable intelligence. Systems which were once leveraged for a narrow, dedicated purpose, can suddenly be engaged broadly across an organization, because the previously under-utilized data can be harnessed for enhancing productivity and performance. Video analytics software The video intelligence software processes and analyses video to detect all the people and objects that appear When it comes to physical security, for instance, video surveillance is a standard solution. Yet, by introducing AI-driven video analytics software, video data can be leveraged as intelligence in previously inaccessible ways. Here are some examples of how diverse organizations are using AI-based video intelligence solutions to enhance security and performance with searchable, actionable and quantifiable insights. Law enforcement relies on video surveillance infrastructure for extracting investigation evidence and monitoring people and spaces. Instead of manual video review and live surveillance – which is prone to human error and distraction – police can harness video content analysis to accelerate video investigations, enhance situational awareness, streamline real-time response, identify suspicious individuals and recognize patterns and anomalies in video. The video intelligence software processes and analyses video to detect all the people and objects that appear; identify, extract and classify them; and then index them as metadata that can be searched and referenced. Maintaining public safety For law enforcement, the ability to dynamically search video based on granular criteria is critical for filtering out irrelevant details and pinpointing objects of interest, such as suspicious persons or vehicles. Beyond accelerating video evidence review and extraction, police can leverage video analysis to configure sophisticated real-time alerts when people, vehicles or behaviors of interest are detected in video. Instead of actively monitoring video feeds, law enforcement can assess triggered alerts and decide how to respond. In this way, officers can also react faster to emergencies, threats and suspicious activity as it develops. Video analysis empowers cities to harness their video surveillance data as operational intelligence Empowering law enforcement to maintain public safety is important beyond the benefit of increasing security: A city with a reputation for effective, reliable law enforcement and enhanced safety is more likely to attract residents, visitors and new businesses, exponentially driving its economic development. Furthermore, in cities where law enforcement can work productively and quickly, time and human resources can be reallocated to fostering growth and building community. Video surveillance data Video analysis empowers cities to harness their video surveillance data as operational intelligence for optimizing city management and infrastructure. When video data is aggregated over time, it can be visualized into dashboards, heatmaps and reports, so operators can identify patterns and more seamlessly detect anomalous. A city could, for instance, analyze the most accident-prone local intersection and assess the traffic patterns to reveal details such as where cars are dwelling and pedestrians are walking; the directional flows of traffic; and the demographic segmentations of the objects detected: Are cars lingering in no-parking zones? Are pedestrians using designated crosswalks – is there a more logical location for the crosswalk or traffic light? Do vehicles tend to make illegal turns – should police proactively deter this behavior, or should the city plan new infrastructure that enables vehicles to safely perform these turns? Finally, does the rise in bike traffic warrant implementing dedicated biking lanes? With video intelligence, urban planners can answer these and other questions to facilitate local improvements and high quality of life. Video analysis empowers cities to harness their video surveillance data as operational intelligence Enhancing situational awareness Insight into traffic trends is also critical for transport companies, from public transit services to transportation hubs and airports. By leveraging the video insights about citywide traffic, public transit organizations can make data-driven decisions about scheduling and services. Analyzing video surveillance around bus stops, for instance, can help these companies understand the specific hours per day people tend to dwell around bus stops. Correlating this information with transactional data for each bus line, bus schedules can be optimized based on demand for individual bus lines, shortening waiting times for the most popular routes. Similarly, the traffic visualisations and activity heatmaps derived from the video of major transit hubs, such as international airports and central stations, can be beneficial for increasing security, enhancing situational awareness, identifying causes of congestion, improving throughput and efficiency and, ultimately, solving these inefficiencies to provide a streamlined customer experience for travellers. Large education campuses Campus law enforcement can leverage video data to increase situational awareness and public safety Much like a city, large education campuses have internal transportation services, residential facilities, businesses and law enforcement, and video content analysis can support the campus in intelligently managing each of those business units, while also providing video intelligence to these individual groups. Campus law enforcement can leverage video data to increase situational awareness and public safety, driving real-time responses with the ability to make informed assessments and accelerating post-event investigations with access to easily extractable video data. When campuses are expanding or developing additional infrastructure, they can plan new crosswalks, traffic lights, roads, buildings and entrances and exits based on comprehensive video intelligence. By understanding where pedestrians and vehicles dwell, walk, cross or even violate traffic laws, the campus can inform construction projects and traffic optimization. Countless business operations The campus can leverage video business intelligence to justify leasing pricing for different retailers across campusFinally, the campus can leverage video business intelligence to justify leasing pricing for different retailers across campus, demonstrating property values based on traffic trends that can be correlated with retailer point of sale data. Whether its empowering security, productivity or decision-making, the insights generated by AI-based technology can drive significant optimization – especially when data is fused and cross-referenced across smart sensors and systems for even deeper intelligence. In the case of AI-backed video analytics, diverse organizations can harness video surveillance impactfully and dynamically. Whereas once video technology investments could be justified for their security value – with the introduction of AI capabilities – procurement teams can evaluate these solutions for countless business operations, because they offer broadly valuable intelligence. And video surveillance and analytics is merely one example of AI-driven solutions’ potential to disrupt business as we know it.

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Panasonic I-PRO To Unveil New Vision For The Future At ISC West 2020
Panasonic I-PRO To Unveil New Vision For The Future At ISC West 2020

With a new vision, Panasonic i-PRO will take center stage at ISC West 2020 to officially launch its new business strategy and solutions roadmap. The Panasonic i-PRO exhibition will focus on providing users with meaningful innovations tailored to their specific challenges employing the latest developments in AI-enhanced software and intelligent edge devices. “ISC West presents the perfect industry platform to unveil the new vision for our company here in the U.S, and the innovative technologies and solutions we have in line to support it,” said Bill Brennan, Vice President of the Security Division. “Our enhanced portfolio of AI-driven open platform software and analytics combined with new imaging and intelligent edge solutions provide us with the unique ability to deliver comprehensive integrated solutions specifically tailored to address specific needs and challenges.” Panasonic i-PRO exhibit The Panasonic i-PRO exhibit at ISC West will feature four primary pavilions addressing critical trends and applications including: AI solutions and integrated systems on the technology front, and local government and education on the application front. Featured products and solutions showcased across the exhibit will include: Significant enhancements to Video Insight, a powerful and fully scalable Video Management System (VMS) that comes fully integrated with the company’s i-PRO MonitorCast access control platform includes; support for Intel ninth generation chipsets for enhanced server performance; HALO IoT smart sensor integration that enables features like vape detection with alerts, as well as the detection of various other environmental impurities; a new client to support Apple TV media boxes; facial recognition redaction to blur individuals’ faces on recorded video used or forensic investigations for privacy protection; visitor management integration; joystick integration; advanced rules management; and more. The i-PRO AI Camera Series capitalizes on new developments in AI to deliver higher levels of intelligence at the edge. The new series features nine new indoor and outdoor cameras complemented by two software modules that can run advanced analytics at the edge, further optimizing system bandwidth and storage requirements. A Software Development Kit (SDK) is also available to enable third party software compatibility. The i-PRO U Series Cameras deliver high performance imaging capabilities at competitive price points. The new U Series includes eight indoor and outdoor dome and bullet cameras with features that include; H.265 compatibility, Video Motion Detection (VMD), and a host of advanced features found on i-PRO Extreme cameras. The new U Series are bundled with i-PRO Video Insight 7.5 VMS software and feature a five year warranty. Panasonic i-PRO will also be featuring its innovative FacePRO Facial Recognition Software, which was rated the “world’s highest rated facial recognition engine” by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in addition to the company’s recently expanded portfolio of Intelligent Analytics.

Panasonic’s I-PRO Extreme PTZ Infra-Red Security Cameras Offer Enhanced Night Visibility
Panasonic’s I-PRO Extreme PTZ Infra-Red Security Cameras Offer Enhanced Night Visibility

Panasonic’s latest i-PRO Extreme PTZ Infra-Red security cameras set a new benchmark in night-time visual quality and intelligent functionality, packaged in a device designed for reliability and low-level maintenance to deliver lower total cost of ownership. There are two models in the IR PTZ camera range: the WV-X6533LN model with a powerful 40x zoom and the WV-S6532LN with 22x zoom. night-time visibility               Capturing clear images for use as evidence in low level lighting and at long distances can be a challenge in any outdoor security environment. Able to capture low light evidence even at distances of up to 350 meters in a zero lux environment, the cameras improve visibility by mixing visible and IR LED lighting through a new auto focus with visible light cut filter. This means that multiple light sources in one frame are no longer an issue. To provide clarity even at long distances, the camera has an optional high-powered 40x optical zoom function To provide clarity even at long distances, the camera has an optional high-powered 40x optical zoom function combined with Intelligent Zoom Stabilization to absorb vibrations and capture a stable image even from a fair distance away. A 30 degree elevation angle enables sloping roads, tall buildings and difficult areas such seating areas under stadium roofs to be easily covered by the cameras. Cyber protection and bandwidth control Rain and dust can badly affect the quality of images and increase the need for expensive regular maintenance. To combat these challenges, the camera lens comes with a hydrophilic ClearSight lens coating which is resistant to the build-up of rainwater, stains, and dust accumulation. A new inbuilt defroster also ensures crystal clear images by preventing condensation or ice accumulating on the lens in extreme weather conditions. To ensure CCTV footage is kept safe from unauthorized external access, the cameras are under vulnerability assessment and come with Digicert (Formerly Symantec) certification, which includes end-to-end data encryption and FIPS140-2 CAVP compliance without any built-in backdoor access. Panasonic IR-LED PTZ cameras High resolution security camera systems can quickly have a negative impact on an organization’s IT infrastructure with large network data and storage requirements. The Panasonic IR-LED PTZ cameras come with a range of smart compression functionality to reduce this business impact. The camera uses H.265 compression with Panasonic’s latest smart coding technology to reduce network bandwidth use and storage requirements. Auto VIQS automatically determines areas with and without motion and reduces the data volume of those without motion. The camera also has built in Smart Facial Coding, which detects and records faces in high quality. Smart Analytics A security camera can act as a deterrent but its real potential can be achieved when combined with intelligent applications that free-up operator time by automating functions and notifying when pre-defined alerts are triggered or action required. A license for this Intelligent Video Motion Detection (i-VMD) functionality is available free-of-charge, enabling users to bring intelligence to their security cameras. Intelligent Video Motion Detection Intelligent Video Motion Detection can be used to zone surveillance areas  Intelligent Video Motion Detection (i-VMD) can be used to zone surveillance areas and scan for pre-defined or unexpected behaviors. This could include detecting and notifying if someone enters or loiters in an area, removes objects or, for example, if a vehicle drives the wrong way down a one-way street. To reduce total cost of ownership for customers, Panasonic’s i-PRO Extreme camera range is designed and tested for use in challenging conditions to ensure long life. Extensive Panasonic testing covers dust, temperature, water, static electricity, vibration and drops, as well as IK10 vandal resistance. New Fiber Optic Media Converter Unit To further reduce replacement and maintenance costs, The IR PTZ cameras have a highly durable pan/tilt gear drive that delivers a four-time longer lifespan than traditional belt drives. Panasonic’s innovative new Fiber Optic Media Converter Unit, which is integrated conveniently into the camera bracket, can also be used with the IR-LED PTZ cameras when purchased as an optional extra. The solution offers all the advantages of running fiber direct to Panasonic outdoor PTZ and dome / fisheye cameras but removes the insecurity of having a box mounted separately to the camera or in the ground nearby. Installation time and construction complexity are reduced and there is no need to waste time selecting and evaluating individual optical media converters.

Top Ten Security Industry Mergers and Acquisitions of 2019
Top Ten Security Industry Mergers and Acquisitions of 2019

Two of the most familiar names in the physical security market – Pelco and Panasonic – underwent ownership changes during 2019. Consolidation continued on multiple other fronts. Security service companies, video companies and access control companies were all among the entities involved in merger and acquisition (M&A) activity during the last 12 months. In short, the industry landscape continues to transform in response to a changing market. Here's a look at the Top 10 M&A stories in 2019: 1. Pelco Acquired by Private Equity Firm Transom Capital Pelco Inc. was acquired in May by Transom Capital Group, a private equity firm, from Schneider Electric. Since the acquisition, Transom Capital has been working with Pelco’s management and employees to define and direct the next chapter of the iconic company. Pelco maintains its headquarters in Fresno, Calif., and has a presence in Fort Collins, Colo., near Denver, and a sales office in the New York area, not to mention many global employees who work remotely. 2. Panasonic Spins Off Security Business Electronics giant Panasonic sold off 80% of its video surveillance business to a private equity firm but is retaining 20%, and the new company will continue to use the well-known Panasonic brand. The move is aimed at reinvigorating a business challenged by competition from Chinese companies and lower video prices. Polaris Capital Group Co. acquired 80% of the outstanding shares of the new security systems business. 3. Qognify Acquires OnSSI and SeeTec 2019 began with the acquisition of IP video management software (VMS) company On-Net Surveillance Systems (OnSSI), including SeeTec in Europe. Backed by the global investment firm Battery Ventures, Qognify completed the acquisition in the final days of 2018. With Qognify, OnSSI and SeeTec operating under one umbrella, the company provides VMS, video analytics, PSIM and critical incident management for mid-market and enterprise organizations. 4. Busy Year for Acquisitions at Allied Universal Security services company Allied Universal had an active year in acquisitions, beginning in April with the acquisition of integration company Securadyne Systems in Dallas. There was an additional acquisition announced in each of the next four months: Point 2 Point Global Security, Dallas, in May; security services company Cypress Private Security in June, services company Shetler Security Services in July , and Midstate Security in August. Allied Universal announced two more acquisitions in November – low-voltage integrator Advent Systems Inc. in Chicago and Vinson Guard Service in Louisiana. Also in November, Allied announced a transformational merger with SOS Security. In December, Allied Universal acquired APG Security, South Amboy, N.J. 5. Motorola Continues Video Push with VaaS Acquisition Following its acquisition of Avigilon in 2018, Motorola Solutions continued to build its presence in the security market in 2019 with the acquisition of VaaS International Holdings, Inc. (VaaS), a data and image analytics company. Motorola Solutions paid $445 million in a combination of cash and equity for the company, which includes fixed and mobile license plate reader cameras driven by machine learning and artificial intelligence. 6. ACRE Acquires Access Control Companies Open Options and RS2 Open Options is an open architecture access control company headquartered in Addison, Texas; and RS2 is an open systems access control provider in Munster, Ind. ACRE, global provider of security systems, wrapped up acquisition of both firms in 2019, after announcing the Open Options deal in the waning days of 2018 and following it up with the RS2 announcement in the spring. ACRE’s portfolio now consists of Vanderbilt, Open Options, RS2 and ComNet. 7. Assa Abloy Expands Capabilities with LifeSafety Power Lock and access control giant ASSA ABLOY acquired LifeSafety Power in September, providing a complement to the access control portfolio. The plan is to incorporate LifeSafety Power’s knowledge of power supply and consumption throughout the ASSA ABLOY access control line. LifeSafety Power was established in 2009 and has some 65 employees. The main office is located in Libertyville, Illinois. 8. Distributor Anixter Going Private and Selling to CD&R Anixter International Inc., a distributor of network and security solutions, electrical and electronic solutions and utility power solutions, entered into a definitive agreement with an affiliate of Clayton, Dubilier & Rice (CD&R) to be acquired in an all cash transaction valued at approximately $3.8 billion. The transaction will result in Anixter becoming a private company and is expected to close by the end of the first quarter of 2020. Under the terms of the merger agreement, CD&R-managed funds will acquire all the outstanding shares of Anixter common stock for $81.00 per share in cash. (It has been reported that a new bidder has also emerged, although Anixter is resisting – stay tuned.) 9. Alarm.com Expands Commercial Offering with OpenEye Acquisition Alarm.com has announced a majority-stake acquisition of OpenEye, a provider of cloud-managed video surveillance solutions for the commercial market. OpenEye is optimized for enterprise-level commercial customers requiring expansive video recording capabilities, in addition to remote viewing, administration and diagnostic reporting. Combined with the Alarm.com for Business offering, service providers partnered with Alarm.com now have solutions to accommodate commercial accounts of any size. 10. ADT Makes Multiple Acquisitions, Sells Canadian Operation Another North American security giant, ADT Inc., also had a busy year in mergers and acquisitions. In February, ADT acquired LifeShield, a pioneer in advanced wireless home security systems. In June ADT continued expanding capabilities and geographic reach via Red Hawk Fire & Security, ADT Commercial with the asset purchase agreement of Security Corporation, a commercial security integrator headquartered in Detroit, Mich. In November, ADT Commercial purchased Critical Systems, which specializes in enterprise-class fire alarm, fire suppression, life safety and integrated building security solutions for high-rise properties, healthcare campuses and data, manufacturing and distribution facilities in Atlanta.  In October, ADT announced an agreement to sell its Canadian operations to TELUS Corp.