Dahua 6MP multi-sensor panoramic IR bullet camera
Dahua 6MP multi-sensor panoramic IR bullet camera

Dahua Technology, a high-value, total security solutions provider, will display a new 6MP Panoramic Multi-sensor IR Bullet camera to capture wide areas that typically would require multiple cameras at the ASIS International Conference, where visitors are invited to “Discover the Dahua Difference” at booth #2241. With three individual 2MP cameras residing in an all-in-one IP67 weather-resistant indoor/outdoor housing, the Dahua 6MP HD Multi-Lens Panoramic Network IR Bullet Camera minimises maintenance, cabling and support costs, and can be installed in two-thirds less time. High Quality Images Embedded with an IR cut filter for varying lighting conditions and industry-leading wide dynamic range (WDR) technology (120dB), the camera provides excellent images at any time of day. For challenging low-light applications, the Multi-Sensor IR Bullet camera offers Starlight technology, capturing colour details in low light down to 0.005 lux, resulting in stunningly clear images in very dark environments. Each sensor features a 3.6mm fixed manual lens and an integrated infrared illuminator up to 30m (100ft) for identification of events or intruders. “This multi-sensor IR bullet camera combines three 2MP sensors to create a comprehensive 180-degree overview. It offers one of the most valuable benefits known to man, which is time,” said Tim Wang, CEO, Dahua Technology USA. “Offering the ability to replace multiple single-sensor cameras, this new product offering can save as much as two-thirds the installation time, offering a higher return on investment.” Features With optional built-in intelligent video analytics, the Multi-sensor IR Bullet camera has the ability to detect and analyse moving objects for improved video surveillance. It provides intelligence at the edge, allowing detection of multiple object behaviours such as abandoned or missing objects, facial detection, people counting, and heat mapping. Other key features and benefits include: High Efficiency Video Coding - delivers high quality video without straining the network. Region of Interest (ROI) - allows the user to select and assign specific areas of the scene for bandwidth optimisation. Privacy Masking - four on each sensor, ensures dedicated areas are blocked from viewing. Street Lamp White Balance - compensates for yellow-tinted lighting and restores scenes to their original colour. Integration - conforms to the ONVIF Profile S & G specifications to ensure interoperability between network video products. Onboard Storage - features a Micro SD card slot (Max 128GB), which can eliminate the need and cost for an on-site server, NVR, or PC for recording video.

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Surveillance cameras - Expert commentary

How To Make School Security Effective And Unobtrusive For Students
How To Make School Security Effective And Unobtrusive For Students

Schools today are charged to provide an environment that is both safe and conducive to learning, which can be difficult considering the range of security incidents and challenges they face, including bullying, fights, graffiti, theft and more. In addition to working within often tight budgetary constraints, a main challenge is to provide the highest level of security in an aesthetically pleasing way that doesn’t make students feel as if they are in prison. While these two needs may seem mutually exclusive to some degree, that doesn’t have to be the case. School security can be achieved without building 20-foot walls or putting barbed wire around the perimeter. The key to balancing the security and learning environment can be found in the four pillars of a good school security strategy, namely people, practices, technology and physical environment. A mobile app or text notification system could be used to alert students and staff of potential problems Situational Awareness One of the most effective measures to take is to educate staff and even students to learn to be aware about their surroundings and adopt the 'If you see something, say something' mentality. In an emergency, time is of the essence, so the speed of response becomes critical. Educating staff and students to recognize potential problems and report them is a good first step. Augmenting this with mobile apps and/or texting capabilities, for example, that allow someone to send a photo to school security or law enforcement for quick assessment and evaluation, can speed response even more. A mobile app or text notification system could also be used to alert students and staff of potential problems and provide instructions on what steps to take in order to remain safe. By providing real-time situational awareness about potential responses, these types of technologies can reduce the number of armed guards or resource officers needed to patrol a school or campus, which also makes students more comfortable and able to learn in a non-prison-like environment. Security Best Practices Every school should establish a set of security policies and procedures and ensure that staff and students understand what to do if they suspect a problem or if an incident should unfold at the school. However, too often, schools may not know where to start when seeking out best practices. And once these policies are in place, there may be confusion about how to audit them to ensure people are properly educated. The NFPA has begun work on a school security standard that would address a range of issues schools face on a daily basis A number of organizations are available to aid with this process, such as the Partner Alliance for School Safety a group founded in cooperation with SIA (Security Industry Association), which provides resources and tools to help schools and security professionals evaluate and establish the best security protection for their buildings. These guidelines and best practices are designed to help schools spend their often limited funds on the right security solutions. Safe and Sound Schools provides downloadable school security toolkits, and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has recently released the NFPA 3000 Active shooter response guidelines and has begun work on a school security standard that would address a range of issues schools face on a daily basis. The key takeaway is that the information is out there, and the organisations mentioned above are excellent resources for helping schools create safe, secure and learning-conducive environments. Technology In School Security The second thing that needs to be considered is how technology can be brought to bear to contribute to school security. Video surveillance with video analytics can be deployed to monitor areas at certain times of day. For example, once school starts, there shouldn’t be a lot of activity in the parking lot or in particular areas around the school. For these situations, intelligent cameras with video analytics can be used to detect activity in those areas of interest to alert school security that something may need their attention. This might be a vehicle entering a lot or driving against the normal traffic flow, which may simply be a parent arriving to pick their child up early, or it could be something worth following up on. Radar detection is ideal for perimeters, where a device can be set up unobtrusively to alert when someone enters a particular area In any case, this is something that should be brought to the attention of someone who can quickly assess the situation and determine what, if any, response is needed. Because the goal in a potentially dangerous situation is speed response times. The faster you’re able to detect something using technology, the faster you’re able to respond. Therefore, being able to identify something happening in a parking lot and alert school resource officers could provide 30 seconds or a minute head start for response, which can get the school into a lockdown situation and get first responders on site more quickly.Facial recognition systems and providing access through smartphones could help create a more welcoming and secure environment for students, staff and parents After-Hour Monitoring Solutions Monitoring buildings and facilities after hours presents a different set of challenges. For sporting events, the National Center for Spectator Sports and Security (NCS4) at the University of Southern Mississippi provides best practice guidance for sporting facilities and events not only just for universities but even including those at high schools. It’s been shown that using lighting at night can deter crime. However, it can be expensive to keep a building and grounds illuminated all night, every night. To mitigate these concerns and potential costs, there are video cameras available with extreme low-light capability that allows them to see in near-dark or in some cases complete darkness. This allows a school to save money by turning lights off while achieving a level of surveillance performance similar to daytime deployments. Radar Detection Another technology for effective school security, both during and after school hours, is radar detection. This is ideal for perimeters, where a device can be set up unobtrusively to alert when someone enters a particular area. Radar can be deployed with a single PTZ camera, which can track whatever has been detected to provide real-time situational awareness for a school resource officer or law enforcement to investigate to determine the potential threat, if any, related to the perimeter breach.Following the four pillars of school security can ease the process while improving the effectiveness and efficiency of securing educational facilities More often than not, schools are faced with issues that are not necessarily the worst-case scenario everyone fears, such as how to identify parents and others who are authorized to pick a child up from school early. In this instance, facial recognition systems and providing access through smartphones could help create a more welcoming and secure environment for students, staff and parents. Lighting And Landscaping In addition to technology, one of the things that can contribute to a safer school environment is environmental design. CPTED provides four basic principles, one of which is natural surveillance, which follows a 'see and be seen' philosophy. In other words, when people know they can be seen, they are less likely to commit a crime. The main points in this general principle are lighting and landscaping. For example, a school doesn’t want to block potentially vulnerable areas with landscaping, so the height and thickness of any potential landscaping elements should be carefully considered. In general, openness and visibility should be the guiding factors. Securing Physical Environment Another aspect of the physical environment is maintenance. If a window gets broken but isn’t fixed right away, that tends to invite vandalism. These are just two of the guidelines CPTED offers for creating a more secure environment that doesn’t feel like a prison. In general, finding the right mix between maintaining security and providing a welcoming, aesthetically pleasing and learning-conducive environment can seem like a difficult – if not impossible – task. Following the four pillars of school security can ease the process while improving the effectiveness and efficiency of securing educational facilities.

How The Convergence Of Physical Security And Cybersecurity Will Benefit Businesses
How The Convergence Of Physical Security And Cybersecurity Will Benefit Businesses

The physical security industry is rapidly changing, ever evolving, and one that is growing faster than most other sectors of the greater global market. The latest research shows that the forecasted growth rates will be a compound average growth rate (CAGR) of 7.2% and a total market revenue opportunity of $41.27B through 2022. These economic indicators make the industry a very attractive investment for entrepreneurs and for investment from large corporations from other industries. At ISC West 2018, this was extremely evident as there was a palpable buzz from technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, cloud-based video management systems and cloud-based access control systems. New market entrants such as Amazon, and a seemingly increased interest and investment from the likes of Intel, IBM, and even Microsoft were present and contributed strongly to the buzz of the industry’s largest tradeshow.The global managed security services market is projected to reach nearly $40.97 Bn, with a CAGR of 16.6% over the next five years Need For Education And Enhanced Security With the increased profile of the industry, one can clearly see that the physical security industry is expanding globally to new consumers; bringing with it an increased need to further secure products and services with comprehensive physical and cybersecurity protocols and the need for education. This convergence of physical security and cybersecurity will create new industry leaders that will emerge to lead a new segment of the combined market through strong investment and leadership. According to a report published from Allied Market Research (AMR), the global managed security services market is projected to reach nearly $40.97B, with a CAGR of 16.6% over the next five years. Correlating these two market data points, the forecast for the physical security market is expected to have nearly 18% of the total market opportunity comprised of cloud services at nearly $7B. Sharing Security Service Best Practices In September 2017 at the Cloud+ Conference in Austin, Texas, the leaders of the Access Control as a service (ACaaS) and Video Surveillance as a Service (VSaaS) markets, converged to share industry trends, observations of customer adoption, best practices in implementation and service, financial models, and several in-depth discussions on securing physical security of cloud implementations through cybersecurity. The physical security market will have nearly 18% of the total market opportunity comprised of cloud services These cybersecurity discussions absolutely dominated every discussion with the clear message that as a cloud service provider, manufacturers and integrators must continue to create robust and scalable cybersecurity offerings to protect customer data and facilities. Interestingly, an analysis of all of the past cyber breaches was presented by keynote speaker Dean Drako of Eagle Eye Networks, who, through a powerful visual diagram, noted that all existing breaches in the physical security industry were entirely on manufacturer provided hardware solutions; VMS physically installed on customer premises, and camera specific vulnerabilities across multiple providers.Network personnel, cybersecurity personnel, firewall experts, and cloud-specific software development staff all need to be added to core physical security engineering expertise Cloud Versus Non-Cloud Services The insight that one was able to glean from this information and, that of a greater analysis of cybersecurity hacks across all industries, was that manufacturers and providers of cloud services were more secure and reliable by orders of magnitude than non-cloud solutions. The reason for these phenomena also became glaringly evident; the security protocols of a cloud service provider is central to the business’s value proposition and as such should be addressed across all levels of manufacturing, implementation, and customer utilization. Conversely, non-cloud deployed products rely on field implemented cyber strategies from integrators and end users which often expose lack of skills, education and budget to fully secure these physical security products. Ensuring Successful Deployment As a SaaS service provider, the technical personnel makeup results in an expansion of staff and expertise. Network personnel, cybersecurity personnel, firewall experts, and cloud-specific software development staff all need to be added to core physical security engineering expertise to ensure that the product developed can be successfully implemented and deployed.Implementing a process to protect millions of customer’s data records and facilities begins with mapping out a strategy to secure software and hardware. These new jobs in the physical security industry will astronomically expand as the market continues to grow $6 Bn in a little over 4 years providing new opportunities to existing and new personnel to enter the industry. As a leader in access control hardware and an ACaaS provider, ISONAS has taken it upon themselves to implement a process to ensure that their customers can easily implement their products and gain great peace of mind in regard to the security of the solutions. Data Security Strategies Implementing a process to protect millions of customer’s data records and facilities begins with mapping out a strategy to secure software and hardware. This means employing high-level, seasoned cloud deployment experts to create a strategy in our AWS infrastructure and all ancillary supporting technologies to minimize attack surfaces, create complex, proprietary associations in a multi-layered and multi-tiered connection throughout the application and lastly ensuring that all communication to and from customers’ devices are encrypted and secured. Implementing a process to protect customer’s data records and facilities begins with mapping out a strategy to secure software and hardware Once implemented ISONAS took it upon themselves to validate the infrastructure and the customers experience by subjecting the environments to 3rd party penetration tests. Addressing Cyber Threats These tests, taken up quarterly, ensure a customer that the latest in cyber threats are being addressed and that the manufacturer is providing the latest solutions available in the market.Integration implementation personnel should gain greater knowledge in networks and cybersecurity best practices for their solutions An added benefit is that customers gain the scalable benefits of enterprise corporate cybersecurity protocols at a fraction of the cost of implementing these on their individual premises. As an industry, however, it is not simply the responsibility of the cloud service provider to ensure that the customers data in video and access control are being protected. It is also incumbent on the integrator to ensure that the installation and implementation of the products and solutions are deployed in an educated and skill-based manner. Knowledge Of Networks And Cybersecurity Best Practices The products and services utilized must be easy to implement, be clear in their requirements of the end user networks, and simplistic to apply. Nearly all manufacturers of these products are working diligently to ensure that the integrator has all of the tools at their fingertips to ensure a successful implementation. However, it will remain important that the integration implementation personnel gain a greater knowledge in networks and cybersecurity best practices for their solutions.The products and services utilized must be easy to implement, be clear in their requirements of the end user networks, and simplistic to apply In most cases, this will mean additional jobs for new higher-level personnel, access to additional services to provide to end users, and an elevation of networking and security expertise within their business. Expanding The Reach Of Physical Security These new-found skills and expertise will likely bleed into new markets and expand the reach of the traditional physical security market. It truly is an exciting time to be a part of a rapidly expanding market in the physical security space and to watch the industry react to the growing need for cybersecurity within products and services. In the next four years, there will be new innovations, new investments, and new winners and losers in products and services. It seems clear that those integrators and manufacturers who have begun to create the strategies and products for tomorrow will be well ahead of those who are not actively addressing the need for SaaS products, yet the window to opportunity remains wide open.

Video Surveillance Technologies Evolve To Meet Data And Cybersecurity Challenges
Video Surveillance Technologies Evolve To Meet Data And Cybersecurity Challenges

The Internet of Things (IoT) is having a significant and ever-changing impact on the way we view video security. Today, cameras are expected to be so much more than devices with which to simply capture images; they need to be far smarter than that. These future-facing cameras are becoming an integral part of the vast digital connectivity infrastructure, delivering a parallel performance as intelligent sensors with the ability to extract the kind of invaluable data that helps businesses make improvements in the area of video security, and beyond. However, as the list of possibilities grows, so too does the risk of unauthorized access by cybercriminals. We should all be aware that a single weak link in a communications infrastructure can give hackers access to sensitive data. That’s the bad news. Safeguarding Data And Utilizing Deep Learning The good news is cybercrime can be avoided by employing a data security system that’s completely effective from end-to-end. One technological advancement that the trend-spotters are predicting will become part of the video security vocabulary is ‘deep learning’ Once this level of safeguarding is in place you can begin to confidently explore the technologies and trends happening now, and those on the horizon. So, what will be having an influence on surveillance in 2018? Well, according to IHS Markit, one technological advancement that the trend-spotters are predicting will become part of the video security vocabulary is ‘deep learning’, which uses algorithms to produce multiple layers of information from the same piece of data, therefore emulating the way the human brain absorbs innumerable details every second. In Europe, GDPR compliance will also be a big talking point as new principles for video surveillance data collection, use limitation, security safeguards, individual participation and accountability are introduced. And, as the popularity – and misuse – of drones continues to rise, the recent developments in drone detection technology will be particularly welcomed by those whose primary concern relates to large areas, such as airport perimeter security. The Future Of 'Smart' Video Analytics An important feature of today’s intelligent cameras is the ability to provide smart video analytics. The Bosch ‘i’ series, for example, offers a choice of formats – Essential Video Analytics and Intelligent Video Analytics. Essential Video Analytics is geared toward regular applications such as small and medium businesses looking to support business intelligence (e.g. inter-network data transfer), large retail stores and commercial buildings for advanced intrusion detection, enforcing health and safety regulations (no-parking zones or detecting blocked emergency exits) and analyzing consumer behavior. The camera-based, real-time processing can also be used to detect discarded objects, issue loitering alarms and detect people or objects entering a pre-defined field. Intelligent Video Analytics provides additional capabilities. It is designed for demanding environments and mission-critical applications, such as the perimeter protection of airports, critical infrastructures and government buildings, border patrol, ship-tracking and traffic-monitoring (e.g. wrong-way detection, traffic-counts and monitoring roadsides for parked cars: all vital video security solutions). An important feature of today’s intelligent cameras is the ability to provide smart video analytics Intelligent Video Analytics can also differentiate between genuine security events and known false triggers, such as challenging environments created by snow, wind (moving trees), rain, hail, and water reflections. For more expansive areas, like an airport perimeter fence, the system has the range and capability to provide analysis over large distances. And, if a moving camera is employed, it is also possible to capture data on objects in transit when used in conjunction with the Intelligent Tracking feature. For roadside use, Intelligent Video Analytics systems, such as the Bosch MIC IP range, are resistant to vibrations and can still operate in extreme weather conditions, continuing to detect objects in heavy rain or snow.  Evolving Cameras Past Surveillance It’s becoming ever clearer that the IoT is transforming the security camera from a device that simply captures images, into an intelligent sensor that plays an integral role in gathering the kind of vital business data that can be used to improve commercial operations in areas beyond security. For example, cities are transitioning into smart cities. The capabilities of an intelligent camera extend to the interaction and sharing of information with other devices (only those you have appointed) With intelligent video security cameras at the core of an urban infrastructure smart data can be collected to optimize energy consumption via smart city lighting that responds to crowd detection and movement. Cameras can also be used to improve public transport by monitoring punctuality and traffic flow based on queue lengths, with the ability to control traffic lights an option should a situation require it. As the urban sprawl continues and this infrastructure grows, the need for more knowledge of its use becomes more essential, necessitating the monitoring technology developed for use by human operators to evolve into smart sensing technology, that no longer just provides video feeds, but also uses intelligent analytics and sophisticated support systems. These systems filter out irrelevant sensor data and present only meaningful events, complete with all relevant contextual data to operators to aid their decision-making. Expanding The Video Security Camera Network Today, video analytics technology has tangible benefits for human operator surveillance, and delivers KPIs that are highly relevant to transport operators, planners and city authorities. As an existing infrastructure, a video security camera network can be improved and expanded by installing additional applications rather than replaced. From a business perspective, that means greater value from a limited investment. Thereafter, the capabilities of an intelligent camera extend to the interaction and sharing of information with other devices (only those you have appointed), image and data interpretation, and the ability to perform a variety of tasks independently to optimize both your safety and business requirements. The fact is, cameras see more than sensors. Sounds obvious, but a conventional sensor will only trigger an alarm when movement is detected, whereas a camera can also provide the associated image and information like object direction, size, color, speed or type, and use time stamps to provide historical information regarding a specific location or event. Based on this evidence, the video security camera of today is more than ready for the challenges of tomorrow.