TESA’s new SMARTair™ RFID-enabled cabinet locks secure drug and medicine storage
TESA’s new SMARTair™ RFID-enabled cabinet locks secure drug and medicine storage

SMARTair™ takes wireless locking way beyond doors. New SMARTair™ cabinet locks secure drug and medicine storage with RFID-enabled locks. In spas, swimming pools and sports centres around the world, clients can secure their belongings with credentials stored in water-resistant bands, instead of a cumbersome locker key. Facilities managers using SMARTair™ can control and manage the use of cabinet locks with an easy interface: it takes a few clicks to issue or revoke access credentials, or to generate an audit trail for every secure cabinet in the building. With standalone, offline and update-on-card system management, integrating cabinet locks with your organisation's existing smart cards is simple. SMARTair™ from TESA is compatible with all leading RFID technologies, including iCLASS® by HID, MIFARE™ Classic and DESFire™. More than just convenient, SMARTair™ from TESA is also cost-effective. SMARTair™ wireless locks use standard batteries instead of a 240V mains connection, saving money on running and maintenance costs. At a glance: Wireless lock for cabinets, lockers, drawers and other applications Yes (IP55), Up to 85% humidity without condensation, Temperature (-20°C and +70°C) Battery (up to 20.000 Cycles and max. 3 years), 3 x Standard LR03 AAA 1.5V batteries CE certification Special water resistant bracelet for Health Spa´s and swimming pools which enables users to go running or to swim available

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Access control readers - Expert commentary

Wireless Technology Is Transforming Motion Detection
Wireless Technology Is Transforming Motion Detection

Motion detection is a key feature of security systems in residential and commercial environments. Until recently, systems have relied heavily on closed circuit television (CCTV) and passive infrared (PIR) sensors, which both require significant investment and infrastructure to install and monitor. Developments in wireless technology are increasing home security possibilities. Few years ago, these developments led Cognitive Systems to discover that the wireless signals surrounding oneself can be used to detect motion. Known in the wireless industry as WiFi sensing, this technology brings many benefits that other motion detection solutions have not been able to provide. The working of WiFi sensing At Cognitive Systems, the company has used WiFi sensing technology to develop a motion detection solution called WiFi Motion™, which measures and interprets disruptions in RF signals transmitted between WiFi devices. When movement occurs in a space, ripples in the wireless signals are created. WiFi Motion interprets these ripples and determines if an action, such as sending a notification, is needed. Enabling this functionality in a space is incredibly simple. With a software upgrade to only one’s WiFi access point (or mesh router), motion sensing capabilities are layered into one’s WiFi network. Existing connected WiFi devices then become motion detectors without detracting from their original functions or slowing down the network. Using artificial intelligence (AI), WiFi Motion establishes a benchmark of the motionless environment and learns movement patterns over time, which could be used to predict trends. This allows unusual movement patterns to be detected with greater accuracy while decreasing the potential for costly false alerts. WiFi Motion requires no line-of-sight or installation WiFi sensing and other home monitoring solutions All of these capabilities are made possible by WiFi sensing and together create a motion detection system that provides unparalleled accuracy, coverage, privacy and affordability compared to other solutions on the market. PIR integration is far more complex and imposes electronic and physical design restrictions compared to WiFi sensing. In terms of placement, PIR systems are difficult to install, requiring line-of-sight and a device in every room for localization. WiFi Motion requires no line-of-sight or installation and is also a scalable solution compared to PIR. Much like cameras, PIRs can only cover so much space, but WiFi Motion can cover the entire home and even detect motion in the dark and through walls, without adding additional devices to the home. WiFi Motion detects less distinguishing context than cameras and microphones, but more context than regular PIR sensors for the perfect balance of privacy and highly accurate motion detection. Privacy solution While cameras have been the security solution for years, WiFi Motion offers a more affordable solution that can rival the privacy and coverage capabilities of even the most high-end cameras. With such a wide coverage area, one might think that WiFi sensing infringes on privacy, but actually, the opposite is true. With WiFi Motion, the contextual information collected cannot be used to identify a specific individual, unlike cameras which can clearly identify a person’s face or microphones, which can identify a person’s voice. It is different from other smart home security options that use cameras and microphones because it only senses motion using WiFi signals - it doesn’t “see” or “listen” like a camera or microphone would. This provides opportunities for added security in spaces where privacy might be a concern and installing a camera may not be a comfortable solution, such as bathrooms and bedrooms. The data collected is also anonymized and highly encrypted according to stringent industry privacy standards. Existing connected WiFi devices then become motion detectors Additional WiFi sensing applications Since WiFi sensing technology requires no additional hardware or subscription fees, it is much more affordable than other motion detection solutions. It can be used as a standalone solution, or it can be easily layered into more complex systems. This ease of integration, scalability and relatively low cost brings a lot of potential for various applications. Motion detection can trigger other smart devices in the network to turn lights on or off In eldercare, for example, WiFi sensing can be used to help seniors live comfortably in their homes for as long as possible. With the increasing aging population and high costs associated with care homes, the market for this application is considerable. Caregivers can use an app to monitor movement in their loved one’s home and be alerted about unusual movement patterns that could indicate a concern. For smart homes and other environments that have a network of smart devices, the artificial intelligence (AI) component of the technology allows for improvements to automated features. Motion detection can trigger other smart devices in the network to turn lights on or off or make adjustments to the temperature in a room. Security for the commercial sector For office buildings and other commercial properties, it is easy to see how all of these features could be scaled up to offer a highly accurate and cost-effective motion sensing and smart device automation solution. Cognitive Systems is closely involved with the development of WiFi sensing technology, working with various industry groups to establish standards and help it reach its full potential. WiFi Motion is merely the tip of the iceberg in terms of motion sensing possibilities, but its applications in the world of security are undeniably compelling. It is an exciting time for the wireless industry, as one works with stakeholders in the security space to explore everything this technology can do.

The Growth Of The Mobile Access Card Market In 2020
The Growth Of The Mobile Access Card Market In 2020

The emergence of smartphones using iOS and Android is rapidly changing the landscape of the IT industry around the world. Several industries, such as digital cameras, car navigation, MP3, and PNP, have been replaced by equivalent or even better performance using smartphones. Smartphones provide increasing portability by integrating the functions of various devices into a single unit which allows them to connect to platforms with network-based services and offer new services and conveniences that have never been experienced before. These changes have expanded into the access control market. Although not yet widespread, ‘Mobile access cards’ is one of the terminologies that everyone has been talking about. RF cards used for access security are being integrated into smartphones just as digital cameras and MP3s were in the past. While people might forget their access cards at home in the morning, they seldom forget their smartphones. Using smartphones for access control increases entry access reliability and convenience. Mobile/smartphone access control A key aspect of mobile credential is that it makes it possible to issue or reclaim cards without face-to-face interaction As in other markets, the combination of smartphones and access cards is creating a new value that goes beyond the simple convenience of integration enhancing the ability to prevent unauthorized authentication and entrance. People sometimes lend their access cards to others, but it is far less likely they might lend their smartphone with all their financial information and personal information – to another person. This overcomes an important fundamental weakness of RF cards. Another valuable aspect of mobile credential is that it makes it possible to issue or reclaim cards without face-to-face interaction. Under existing access security systems, cards must be issued in person. Since card issuance implies access rights, the recipient’s identification must be confirmed first before enabling the card and once the card has been issued, it cannot be retracted without another separate face-to-face interaction. Mobile access cards In contrast, mobile access cards are designed to transfer authority safely to the user's smartphone based on TLS. In this way, credentials can be safely managed with authenticated users without face-to-face interaction. Mobile cards can be used not only at the sites with a large number of visitors or when managing access for an unspecified number of visitors, but also at the places like shared offices, kitchens and gyms, currently used as smart access control systems in shared economy markets. The market share of mobile access cards today is low even though the capability can offer real benefits to users and markets. While the access control market itself is slow-moving, there are also practical problems that limit the adoption of new technologies like mobile access cards. Use of Bluetooth Low Energy technology While NFC could be an important technology for mobile credential that is available today on virtually all smartphones, differences in implementation and data handling processes from various vendors prevents universal deployment of a single solution to all devices currently on the market. Accordingly, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has been considered as an alternative to NFC. Bluetooth is a technology that has been applied to smartphones for a long time, and its usage and interface are unified, so there are no compatibility problems. However, speed becomes the main problem. The authentication speed of BLE mobile access card products provided by major companies is slower than that of existing cards. Enhancing credential authentication speed Authentication speed is being continuously improved using BLE's GAP layer and GATT layers The second problem is that mobile access cards must be accompanied by a supply of compatible card readers. In order to use mobile access cards, readers need to be updated but this is not a simple task in the access control market. For 13.56 MHz smart cards (which were designed to replace 125 kHz cards), it has taken 20 years since the standard was established but only about half of all 25 kHz cards have been replaced so far. Legacy compatibility and the need for equivalent performance, even with additional benefits, will drive adoption timing for the Access Control market. While BLE technology helps resolve the compatibility problem of mobile access cards, it can identify some breakthroughs that can solve the speed problem. Authentication speed is being continuously improved using BLE's GAP layer and GATT layers, and new products with these improvements are now released in the market. Making use of key improvements allows Suprema's mobile access card to exhibit an authentication speed of less than 0.5 seconds providing equivalent performance to that of card-based authentication. AirFob Patch MOCA System's AirFob Patch addresses the need for technological improvements in the access control market in a direct, cost effective, and reliable way – by offering the ability to add high-performance BLE to existing card readers – enabling them to read BLE smartphone data by applying a small adhesive patch approximately the size of a coin. This innovative breakthrough applies energy harvesting technology, generating energy from the RF field emitted by the existing RF reader – then converting the data received via BLE back into RF – and delivering it to the reader. By adding the ability to use BLE on virtually any existing RF card reading device, MOCA allows greater ability for partners and end users to deploy a technologically-stable, high performance access control mobile credential solution to their employees, using devices they already own and are familiar with. Adding MOCA AirFob Patch eliminates the need to buy and install updated readers simply to take advantage of mobile credential, lowering costs and risks, and increasing employee confidence and convenience. Growth forecast of mobile access card market in 2020 In 2020, forecasts show that the mobile access card market will grow far more rapidly Several companies have entered the mobile access card market, but they have not set up a meaningful product solution stream until 2019. In 2020, forecasts show that the mobile access card market will grow far more rapidly. Reviewing new entries into the market allows identification of the latest products that provide improving solutions to compatibility and speed problems. MOCA AirFob Patch addresses development plans in process today that overcome the legacy installed base of card readers – allowing rapid creation of an environment that can make immediate use of BLE mobile access cards. Integrated mobile digital ID With proven usability and within suitable environments, mobile access cards will also begin to make inroads into other markets, not just the access control market. In the sharing economy market, which seeks access management without face-to-face interaction, the integrated mobile digital ID led by the 'DID Alliance' will serve as a technical tool that can be used in access authentication – forging increasing links between the access control and digital ID markets.

Entrance Control Vs Access Control: Similarities And Differences
Entrance Control Vs Access Control: Similarities And Differences

Entrance control and access control - of the physical kind - are common terms in the security industry which are often used interchangeably, but should they be? Having worked both sides of the fence, with previous roles at TDSi and HID and now the Major Accounts and Marketing Manager at Integrated Design Limited, Tony Smith highlights the subtle but important differences between these two terms and the systems they refer to, outlining how they should work together to achieve optimal security. Access control is a system which provides discriminating authentication Access control provides a discriminating authentication process and comprises the software or hardware that defines the criteria for acceptance or denial Used to describe a system which performs identification of users and authentication of their credentials (deciding whether or not the bearer of those credentials is permitted admission) access control is an incredibly broad term. Access control provides a discriminating authentication process and comprises the software or hardware that defines the criteria for acceptance or denial of an individual to a restricted area. Entrance control – such as security turnstiles - takes the output of that validation and has the capability to see whether that criteria is being adhered to, either granting or denying access as appropriate. Entrance control is the hardware responsible for keeping people honest If access control verifies authorized personnel using their credentials – their face, fingerprints, PIN number, fob, key card etc – and decides whether or not they are permitted access, entrance control is the hardware which enforces that decision by making users present their credentials in the correct way, either opening to allow pedestrian access or remaining closed to bar entry and potentially raising an alarm. For example, a card reader acts as an access control device, recognizing the card holder as having the correct permissions and saying ‘yes, this person can pass’. But, it’s the entrance control system – a turnstile, for example – which actually physically allows or denies access. Physical access and video surveillance Some entrance control systems don’t feature a physical barrier, however. Fastlane Optical turnstiles will not physically stop an unauthorized person from passing through, and instead alarm when someone fails to present valid credentials, alerting security staff that a breach has occurred. These kinds of turnstiles are suited to environments which just need to delineate between the public and secure side of an entrance, with less need to physically prevent unauthorized users from entering. State of the art access control integrations have been installed for award-winning complex, The Bower It’s also possible to capture video footage of any incidents, allowing security personnel to identify users failing to abide by the access control system’s rules, using It’s also possible to capture video footage of incidents, allowing security personnel to identify users failing to abide by access control system rules the footage to decide on the level of response required. The breach could have been the result of a member of staff being in a hurry and failing to show their card before passing through, in which case they can be reminded about the security protocol. Or, it could be an unidentified person who needs to be escorted from the premises. Entrance control and access control working together For optimum security, access control and entrance control should work together, with the entrance control system enhancing the use of the access control system, making it more efficient and better value for money. The two can’t effectively operate without each other. Security turnstiles, for example, require something to tell them that someone is about to enter – the access control system does this – and, the access control system needs a method of stopping people when they don’t badge in correctly. The two systems are complementary.

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SMARTair™ Equips New Offices In Alicante With Real-time Access Control And Modern Design
SMARTair™ Equips New Offices In Alicante With Real-time Access Control And Modern Design

At one of Spain’s newest co-working spaces, the founders’ vision incorporated using the latest in security, accessibility and design to create a 21st-century business center. Flexible and wire-free, SMARTair™ from TESA delivers real-time access control that can accommodate both regular daily traffic and busy one-off events at ULab’s dedicated events area. SMARTair Wireless Online Management SMARTair™ Wireless Online management now enables access to the building and individual offices to be controlled in real time. ULab’s SMARTair™ system securely manages regular daily traffic of approximately 100 people, and has the flexibility to accommodate many more temporary visitors when their event space is full. “In addition to regular daily traffic, weekly traffic can almost multiply by 10 if an event is held,” says Enrique Burgos. “We needed an access control system as flexible and convenient as SMARTair™.” Also — and critically for ULab — SMARTair™ escutcheons and wall readers complement the ultra-modern design aesthetic of this new workspace. With SMARTair™ Wireless Online, ULab’s facility manager can monitor the building’s security status from a single control point and in real time, controlling who enters and when. The installation permits remote opening of any door at ULab, enabling easy access in cases where users have lost or forgotten their credential. Remote access can be granted from the SMARTair™ Web Manager software, which works on any device inside a standard browser without software installation, or from the SMARTair™ admin app for Apple and Android cellphone devices. Individual Access Rights For User Profiles It’s also easy to schedule individual access rights for different user profiles — allowing, for example, site managers to access all doors, but offering occasional users more limited entry to common areas. Changes in status can be made instantly from the Web Manager. And because SMARTair™ locks are operated with RFID smartcards, there’s no security problem if an employee loses their credential. With the SMARTair™ admin software, a simple click cancels the credential’s access rights — a much quicker and cheaper process than replacing a mechanical lock. With contemporary, low-profile design, user-friendly operation and flexible, real-time security functionality, SMARTair™ wireless access control has captured the spirit of ULab.

Wireless Access Control Sees Major Growth In 2016
Wireless Access Control Sees Major Growth In 2016

The shift from wired to wireless access control was expected to gather pace in 2016—and that has happened. This year we at Assa Abloy surveyed a large cross-section of security professionals, seeking their insight into the changing market. Comparing our data with research we did in 2014 showed a clear trend towards wireless access control.   Wireless Access Data Our 2014 survey found 23% of commercial properties using a wireless or hybrid wired/wireless access control system. By 2016, that was 29%, with 5% of premises already fully wireless. We know we’re on the right track: ASSA ABLOY has invested heavily in market and product research, and we will continue. More card- and key-based wireless access control products are releasing through 2017 and beyond. We see a parallel trend in the residential market. Connected smart door locks, as part of smart homes, are becoming more high-profile, vindicating our investment in this sector. Our Yale brand has the largest range of smart door locks on the market.Efficient Security Solutions In 2016, more efficient security solutions have been right at the top of the agenda. Corporate and public sector budgets are tight, and that is likely to continue. On the commercial side, customers increasingly demand access control solutions that integrate with their current building management systems, even if those are made by different manufacturers. That’s why our Aperio wireless locks, cylinders, and escutcheons are built to open standards, for example. On the domestic side, connected living is taking off Connected Living Solutions Solutions must be easy to manage with low installation and maintenance costs, which is a major benefit of wireless access control. On the domestic side, connected living is taking off. More service providers in the domestic market—from energy suppliers to telecoms and security providers—are offering smart door locks as part of connected living solutions to their customers. Access Control In 2016 Looking ahead to 2017, interoperability and compatibility will be increasingly important in commercial access control, as customers expect multiple systems to integrate seamlessly. In smart-home technologies, too: Platforms like Samsung SmartThings, the UK’s O2 Home, innogy SmartHome in Germany and many others are critical to the growth of smart-home security. We also see a growing role for access control solutions in small and medium-sized businesses. Wireless access systems like our SMARTair or CLIQ Go product line make it more affordable and easier to install and run than ever. See the full coverage of 2016/2017 Review and Forecast articles here Save

Wireless Access Control Moves Closer To Mainstream Adoption, With More Potential Waiting To Be Tapped
Wireless Access Control Moves Closer To Mainstream Adoption, With More Potential Waiting To Be Tapped

Everything about wireless access control makes life easier for those who install and operate it A lot of market data crosses my desk at ASSA ABLOY. Sometimes it can be hard to spot patterns or pick out the trends. But not always. Some recent access control market research we commissioned pointed in one direction. Our conclusion? Slowly but surely, access control is becoming a wireless technology As the global leader in door opening solutions, we are able to survey a large, representative segment of security professionals. Comparing our latest data with similar research conducted in 2014 clearly indicates the trend. Our 2014 report found 23% of commercial properties using a wireless or hybrid wired/wireless access control system. Fast forward to 2016 and the proportion has risen to 29%, with 5% of the installed base already with a fully wireless setup. That’s a significant leap, in a relatively short time. Already, 69% of respondents consider wireless locks a cost-effective alternative to wired access control. A whopping 62% even predict that few business premises will still have mechanical locks within a decade. We published the detailed results in a report, “The Wireless Access Control Market in 2016”. Easy To Operate, Easy To Integrate But why wireless? What aspects of the technology appeal in particular to facility managers, integrators and installers? Cost-efficiency, ease of installation, and the compliance requirements for audit trails are often cited by building managers. Everything about wireless access control makes life easier for those who install and operate it. It’s easy to extend an existing third-party access control system by switching mechanical locking cylinders for battery-powered, electronic Aperio® cylinders, for example. You can bring them into the existing, single control panel via communications hubs (online integration) or via update-on-card (offline). Compare that to the full-scale rewiring job needed to add traditional magnetic locks! Key management headaches are eliminated by RFID smartcards, as are the security risks posed by a lost mechanical key — an all-too-common occurrence Equipping doors previously locked using mechanical keys with electronic access control upgrades a site’s security in an instant. Key management headaches are eliminated by RFID smartcards, as are the security risks posed by a lost mechanical key — an all-too-common occurrence, and something 86% of our survey respondents also worry about. EN, DIN and CE wireless lock certification drive still more customers to wireless. Easy, effective integration of wireless lock technologies like Aperio® with CCTV, alarm and other security systems is another major benefit. The era of the smart building is here; locking systems that integrate seamlessly with complementary building management infrastructure are increasingly vital. “Wireless locks are often specially designed for integration with other systems. The integration capabilities and ease of use can be a significant benefit,” writes Blake Kozak, principal analyst at IHS Research, in commentary on our report. Extensive Adoption Across Many Business Sectors Wireless is extensively adopted across many business sectors. In a corporate office setting, the ability for facility managers to amend access rights remotely, to instantly cancel lost cards or to extend an existing wired access control system without disruptive structural alterations are all valuable. Sensitive settings such as hospitals and residential care homes need the real-time information flow that only electronic access control can supply. Online wireless locks provide this much more cost-effectively than any other technology — and are even available with hermetic sealing and anti-bacterial coating. In the event of a security breach at a medicine store of patient records area, wireless locks generate detailed audit trails for locks, users or smartcards that regulatory compliance demands. In student accommodation blocks, lost keys are a recurring security risk and drain on resources — risks and costs that are eliminated by installing wireless access control instead of mechanical locks. Critical infrastructure sites are often widely dispersed or remote (or both). Wireless locks don’t need a mains electricity connection, making them a perfect choice for reservoirs, electricity sub-stations and power generation or distribution facilities. Certified locks and encrypted communications between lock and system ensure security meets the stringent demands of such critical premises. Wireless locks don’t need a mains electricity connection, making them a perfect choice for critical infrastructure sites Aperio Wireless Locks Among our own product portfolio, Aperio® wireless locks integrate with almost any leading access control system, allowing facility managers to take access control much further into a site than would be possible with wired access control. At i2 serviced offices around the UK, Aperio® wireless locks replaced the slow and expensive job of hardwiring every newly sublet office into i2’s central access control system. Aperio® is the access control backbone of a 100% wireless deployment at Ghent’s Hospital Maria Middelares. It enables real-time management and “gold standard” resident care at a new care home in Umeå, Sweden, as well as flexible, online access control at the University of Surrey’s Manor Park campus. SMARTair For Small To Medium-sized Premises SMARTair™ is a stand-alone wireless locking system aimed at small to medium-sized premises, including offices, retirement homes, hospitals, small hotels and universities. Building managers at Frankfurt’s Tower 185 chose SMARTair™ for its easy installation and access rights processing speed. Because SMARTair™ locks are wireless, they consume less energy and emit much less CO2 than wired magnetic locks. It’s no coincidence, then, that Tower 185 was among the first European high-rises to be awarded Gold LEED Certification by the US Green Building Council. The flexibility of SMARTair™ was also a major factor in the Red Cross’s decision to select it for its new Córdoba headquarters. CLIQ key Management Solution CLIQ® is a mechatronic technology, based on patented, high-security cylinders, battery-powered, programmable keys and encrypted electronic communications between cylinders and system. It is widely adopted in critical infrastructure settings around Europe. Its security credentials and the ability for in-house managers to issue contractors with programmable keys are a major benefit to workflow management in these complex organizations. The ability for in-house managers to issue contractors with programmable keys is a major benefit to workflow management in complex organizations In Helsinki, Finland, CLIQ® secures 3,500 interior and exterior doors at 70 different sites for Helsingin Energia, ensuring 400,000 customers have uninterrupted electricity supply. The whole ecosystem is managed remotely from simple, web-based CLIQ® administration software. Industrielle Werke Basel needed a locking system that would equip it to face 21st-century security challenges — as well as padlocks that could withstand extremes of climate and weather. CLIQ® technology ticked all the boxes. Adopting Wireless Beyond Doors Interestingly, our recent customer research also finds the market is already tuned-in to the potential for wireless beyond just doors. Well over half of respondents judged electronic access control well suited to securing server racks, cabinets, lockers, safes, and machines, as well as padlocked outdoor structures. Flexibility makes wireless technology the natural solution. “Interior doors, file cabinets, carts and other deployments will increasingly use wireless electronic systems,” says Kozak. “In deployments beyond doors, IHS expects mechatronic locks to see the most growth. Globally, we forecast that these devices will see volume growth of about 24% in 2016 as security personnel strengthen security to adhere to strict compliance regulations, which often require audit trails. Mechanical keys simply don’t offer this level of tracking.” With audit trail compliance, easy installation, cost efficiency, and seamless integration, wireless access control makes life easier for security managers, installers and system integrators. This, surely, is the secret to its rapid growth. We see it in survey responses and its increasingly widespread adoption across many sectors— and we expect to keep seeing it, as we analyze market trends through 2016 and beyond.

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