Bosch Benefits From Increasing Awareness For Its Access Control Solutions
Bosch Benefits From Increasing Awareness For Its Access Control Solutions

Following the Security 2010 exhibition in Essen, Germany, it is evident that Bosch is receiving increased awareness for its investment in the access control and integrated systems markets. While the Bosch booth has traditionally been popular for its video, communications, intrusion detection, and fire prevention solutions, this year Bosch saw an exponential increase of interest in the access control and integrated systems offerings, making it yet one of the areas of highest growth potential.In Essen, Bosch showcased its complete portfolio of access control and integrated systems solutions. Customers were able to see and experience solutions for small, mid-sized and large environments: the Access Easy Control System supporting up to 32 readers, the reliable 128-reader Access Professional Edition system, and the Building Integration System (BIS) software. The BIS software system is used to connect all security, safety, and building automation components and to integrate them into one central and comprehensive management system.Further to the enhancement of the portfolio itself, Bosch is increasing its market presence with additional service offerings and more trained marketing and salespeople to answer the growing demand. According to Alex Squarize, Bosch Security Systems, "Bosch is absolutely in a good position for future growth. The investment in research and development over the past years has already started to pay off. We are adding to our portfolio day after day, while we continue to invest into training and development of our employees. No other company in the market is currently investing as much into access control and integrated systems solutions.""The future outlook remains positive", Squarize continues. "We are currently seeing more and more implementations of these Bosch solutions, and we are experiencing substantial growth in both geographical reach and quantity. We look forward to 2011 with optimism!"Download PDF of Bosch Access Easy Control system

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The New Age Of Access Control From Bosch
The New Age Of Access Control From Bosch

Access control has become a vital component of any security concept worldwide. The protection of intellectual property rights, prevention of theft and sabotage or simply compliance requirements - there are a multitude of reasons why companies of all kinds need to use a comprehensive access control system to restrict, manage and control access to their facilities. However, operated in isolation from other safety and security systems, even the most sophisticated access control system cannot really live up to its promises. In such an environment, operation and monitoring can quickly turn into a nightmare, as each system has its own architecture, its own user interface and its own management tool. This is why more and more organizations are looking out for an access control solution that easily integrates with video monitoring, intrusion detection and sometimes even visitor management to form a homogeneous security system with a consistent user interface and central management and operations.Moreover, suppliers are more and more often faced with requirements of their customers to supply a documentation of all access attempts, whether successful or not, to protect against industrial espionage. To fulfill this requirement, not only employee access must be captured and recorded, but also the entire visitor traffic. Video integration for more safetyWhile modern access control systems allow an efficient management of access rights, they are rather powerless against abuse if operated on their own. In critical environments it is mandatory to add a second layer of security by integrating access control with some kind of video surveillance. To prevent abuse, all access requests can then trigger one or more video cameras. Integrated systems can provide alarm verification, instantly displaying live video images from nearby cameras when there is an alarm event at a door - such as when a person presents an unauthorized credential or when a door is forced open. Forensics can also benefit from such integration if the video recordings are referenced in the access control system's event log. Such a feature greatly facilitates identification, retrieval and playback of past events and alarms if necessary.Open standards ease integrationIntegrating access control, video monitoring, and intrusion detection can be rather easy when all components come from the same vendor and if this vendor also offers a management platform like the Building Integration System from Bosch for all of them. Integrated systems "off the shelf" can greatly ease installation and configuration of the security solution. Logical integration eliminates the need for multiple software platform and interfaces -- resulting in fewer complications and greater event-driven functionality as well as reduced installation time and costs. What's more, this kind of integration also promises more efficient operation and a clearly reduced need for training, but above all also a higher security level. An open standards-based management system even makes sense in those cases where one vendor supplies everything, as it opens up the entire installation for future expansion.User interface is keyAn integrated security system is a very complex apparatus, and if this complexity is not hidden from the user, the system will be highly prone to human error and maloperation. Such systems do need very clear and intuitive user interfaces, avoiding information overload while offering all the information that is currently needed. This is even more important when several components or dialogs are open, which will often be the case if you deal with access control, video surveillance and maybe intrusion detection from the same console.

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Extended Set Of Benefits: New Version Of Building Integration System From Bosch To Be Launched
Extended Set Of Benefits: New Version Of Building Integration System From Bosch To Be Launched

Including interface advancements, enlarged vendor independency and compatibility with the latest Windows Internet Explorer 9, Bosch Security Systems introduces a number of updates to its Building Integration System (BIS). The new version 2.5, which is available from early May 2012, increases the range of supported devices to more than 1,000 different third party cameras and encoders, making it suitable for even the most complex integration projects. The new system allows further optimized security, safety and communication management in one front-end system with customized user interface. The range of video devices supported by BIS 2.5 is unmatched in the industry. It seamlessly interoperates with virtually any video camera, connecting to the latest IP cameras on the market with HD and H.264 encoding technology. The Divar 700 and Bosch Recording Station are supported in their most recent versions. BIS 2.5 benefits installers and end users alike: certified BIS partners and systems integrators enjoy an upgraded level of customization options, such as new layout formats for a wide range of monitor sizes (including 16:9 and 16:10). Thanks to numerous handy improvements, such as useful additions to the symbol libraries, it is now even easier to personalize the system. BIS 2.5 is interoperable with the large variety of ONVIF-compatible, modern IP-based video products supplied by all major manufacturers. ONVIF ensures a uniform standard, allowing customers to choose the product that best fits their individual needs, without having to worry about compatibility. It thereby saves costs and allows long term planning. The ONVIF standard was first introduced by a consortium of companies, including founding member Bosch, in 2008.

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Access Professional Edition 2.1
Access Professional Edition 2.1

Bosch Security Systems further enhances its widely-used access control solution for small and medium-sized companies with the Access Professional Edition (APE) 2.1 which will be released soon. Thanks to new interfaces, an even larger number of devices and operating systems are now compatible.Since its initial launch, the easy-to-use, scalable access control software APE meets an extensive range of security requirements and assures an easy integration of access control with a variety of security functions, such as CCTV, intrusion detection or elevator management. In its updated version, APE features an optimized support of the most common operating systems, such as Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and Windows XP. Furthermore it enables a seamless interconnectivity with Bosch HD cameras and the midrange recorders Divar 400 and Divar 600.With APE, Bosch offers a multifunctional, extremely reliable yet flexible solution for a variety of small to midsized establishments such as office buildings, laboratories, schools or the likes. The system is capable of handling up to 10.000 cardholders. In total 128 readers and 128 cameras can be managed. The access modes ‘card', ‘pin' or ‘card and pin' provide individual levels of security."APE is very popular with our clients, as it caters to all common security requirements and offers a number of additional, handy features", says Patrick Looijmans at Bosch Security Systems. By displaying the database photo and a live image recorded at the door, as well as basic cardholder data with the time stamp of access request for example, the software helps the operator to instantly verify that card and cardholder are matching. Also a fast tracking of persons in the building is possible, which is particularly helpful in case of an emergency. Using the integrated card configuration function furthermore increases the security as badges can be designed according to corporate guidelines and persons can be identified throughout the entire premises. "All in all APE is a modern, straightforward all-round solution, which just got even better in its latest version 2.1", says Patrick Looijmans.

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Access control software - Expert commentary

Home Monitoring At The Edge: Advanced Security In The Hands Of Consumers
Home Monitoring At The Edge: Advanced Security In The Hands Of Consumers

Imagine a home surveillance camera monitoring an elderly parent and anticipating potential concerns while respecting their privacy. Imagine another camera predicting a home burglary based on suspicious behaviors, allowing time to notify the homeowner who can in turn notify the police before the event occurs—or an entire network of cameras working together to keep an eye on neighborhood safety. Artificial Intelligence vision chips A new gen of AI vision chips are pushing advanced capabilities such as behavior analysis and higher-level security There's a new generation of artificial intelligence (AI) vision chips that are pushing advanced capabilities such as behavior analysis and higher-level security to the edge (directly on devices) for a customizable user experience—one that rivals the abilities of the consumer electronics devices we use every day. Once considered nothing more than “the eyes” of a security system, home monitoring cameras of 2020 will leverage AI-vision processors for high-performance computer vision at low power consumption and affordable cost—at the edge—for greater privacy and ease of use as well as to enable behavior analysis for predictive and preemptive monitoring. Advanced home monitoring cameras With this shift, camera makers and home monitoring service providers alike will be able to develop new edge-based use cases for home monitoring and enable consumers to customize devices to meet their individual needs. The result will be increased user engagement with home monitoring devices—mirroring that of cellphones and smart watches and creating an overlap between the home monitoring and consumer electronics markets. A quick step back reminds us that accomplishing these goals would have been cost prohibitive just a couple of years ago. Face recognition, behavior analysis, intelligent analytics, and decision-making at this level were extremely expensive to perform in the cloud. Additionally, the lag time associated with sending data to faraway servers for decoding and then processing made it impossible to achieve real-time results. Cloud-based home security devices The constraints of cloud processing certainly have not held the industry back, however. Home monitoring, a market just seven years young, has become a ubiquitous category of home security and home monitoring devices. Consumers can choose to install a single camera or doorbell that sends alerts to their phone, a family of devices and a monthly manufacturer’s plan, or a high-end professional monitoring solution. While the majority of these devices do indeed rely on the cloud for processing, camera makers have been pushing for edge-based processing since around 2016. For them, the benefit has always been clear: the opportunity to perform intelligent analytics processing in real-time on the device. But until now, the balance between computer vision performance and power consumption was lacking and camera companies weren’t able to make the leap. So instead, they have focused on improving designs and the cloud-centric model has prevailed. Hybrid security systems Even with improvements, false alerts result in unnecessary notifications and video recording Even with improvements, false alerts (like tree branches swaying in the wind or cats walking past a front door) result in unnecessary notifications and video recording— cameras remain active which, in the case of battery powered cameras, means using up valuable battery life. Hybrid models do exist. Typically, they provide rudimentary motion detection on the camera itself and then send video to the cloud for decoding and analysis to suppress false alerts. Hybrids provide higher-level results for things like people and cars, but their approach comes at a cost for both the consumer and the manufacturer. Advanced cloud analytics Advanced cloud analytics are more expensive than newly possible edge-based alternatives, and consumers have to pay for subscriptions. In addition, because of processing delays and other issues, things like rain or lighting changes (or even bugs on the camera) can still trigger unnecessary alerts. And the more alerts a user receives, the more they tend to ignore them—there are simply too many. In fact, it is estimated that users only pay attention to 5% of their notifications. This means that when a package is stolen or a car is burglarized, users often miss the real-time notification—only to find out about the incident after the fact. All of this will soon change with AI-based behavior analysis, predictive security, and real-time meaningful alerts. Predictive monitoring while safeguarding user privacy These days, consumers are putting more emphasis on privacy and have legitimate concerns about being recorded while in their homes. Soon, with AI advancements at the chip level, families will be able to select user apps that provide monitoring without the need to stream video to a company server, or they’ll have access to apps that record activity but obscure faces. Devices will have the ability to only send alerts according to specific criteria. If, for example, an elderly parent being monitored seems particularly unsteady one day or seems especially inactive, an application could alert the responsible family member and suggest that they check in. By analyzing the elderly parent’s behavior, the application could also predict a potential fall and trigger an audio alert for the person and also the family. AI-based behavior analysis Ability to analyze massive amounts of data locally and identify trends is a key advantage of AI at the edge The ability to analyze massive amounts of data locally and identify trends or perform searches is a key advantage of AI at the edge, for both individuals and neighborhoods. For example, an individual might be curious as to what animal is wreaking havoc in their backyard every night. In this case, they could download a “small animal detector” app to their camera which would trigger an alert when a critter enters their yard. The animal could be scared off via an alarm and—armed with video proof—animal control would have useful data for setting a trap. Edge cameras A newly emerging category of “neighborhood watch” applications is already connecting neighbors for significantly improved monitoring and safety. As edge cameras become more commonplace, this category will become increasingly effective. The idea is that if, for example, one neighbor captures a package thief, and then the entire network of neighbors will receive a notification and a synopsis video showing the theft. Or if, say, there is a rash of car break-ins and one neighbor captures video of a red sedan casing their home around the time of a recent incident, an AI vision-based camera could be queried for helpful information: Residential monitoring and security The camera could be asked for a summary of the dates and times that it has recorded that particular red car. A case could be made if incident times match those of the vehicle’s recent appearances in the neighborhood. Even better, if that particular red car was to reappear and seems (by AI behavior analysis) to be suspicious, alerts could be sent proactively to networked residents and police could be notified immediately. Home monitoring in 2020 will bring positive change for users when it comes to monitoring and security, but it will also bring some fun. Consumers will, for example, be able to download apps that do things like monitor pet activity. They might query their device for a summary of their pet’s “unusual activity” and then use those clips to create cute, shareable videos. Who doesn’t love a video of a dog dragging a toilet paper roll around the house? AI at the Edge for home access control Home access control via biometrics is one of many new edge-based use cases that will bring convenience to home monitoring Home access control via biometrics is one of many new edge-based use cases that will bring convenience to home monitoring, and it’s an application that is expected to take off soon. With smart biometrics, cameras will be able to recognize residents and then unlock their smart front door locks automatically if desired, eliminating the need for keys. And if, for example, an unauthorized person tries to trick the system by presenting a photograph of a registered family member’s face, the camera could use “3D liveness detection” to spot the fake and deny access. With these and other advances, professional monitoring service providers will have the opportunity to bring a new generation of access control panels to market. Leveraging computer vision and deep neural networks Ultimately, what camera makers strive for is customer engagement and customer loyalty. These new use cases—thanks to AI at the edge—will make home monitoring devices more useful and more engaging to consumers. Leveraging computer vision and deep neural networks, new cameras will be able to filter out and block false alerts, predict incidents, and send real-time notifications only when there is something that the consumer is truly interested in seeing. AI and computer vision at the edge will enable a new generation of cameras that provide not only a higher level of security but that will fundamentally change the way consumers rely on and interact with their home monitoring devices.

Top Things You Need To Include In Your Construction Site Security Checklist
Top Things You Need To Include In Your Construction Site Security Checklist

One of the responsibilities of construction project managers is to account for risks during the initial planning for a project and mitigate them. With all the tools, construction materials, and heavy machinery during the initial stages of a project, the construction site is a dangerous place to be at. However, this is not the only risk that project managers need to protect a site from. With plenty of valuables both physical and virtual within a construction site, it is also a prime target for theft and arson. Improving the security of construction sites It is important now more than ever that construction business owners and project managers invest in improving the security of construction sites. After all, security on construction sites is for the protection not only of valuable assets but also of workers and members of the public. Investing in adequate resources for construction site security can prevent several issues, including: Theft of expensive tools and construction equipment Cybersecurity breaches leading to loss of sensitive information such as invoice data Arson resulting in loss of life and property Vandalism of construction site property Trespassing by unauthorized parties and exposure to construction site dangers Risks of injuries that can result in litigation and legal claims Identifying security issues Having a dedicated security team in place is a good first step in bolstering a construction site’s security. They will be able to prevent theft, vandalism, and deter unauthorized personnel from entering the site. They can also identify security issues that can potentially arise and even respond quickly to accidents and other calamities should they occur. Having a dedicated security team in place is a good first step in bolstering a construction site’s security For a better implementation of construction site security measures, it is critical that business owners and managers assess an assessment of the site itself. This will help identify both internal and external risks that can affect the site’s security and guide project managers in putting systems in place to address them. Construction site security checklist To guide you, here is a sample template that you can use to form your own construction site security checklist.  SECURITY COORDINATION  YES   NO  1. Does the site have designated security coordinators?     2. Are the security coordinators available for contact during non-business hours?     3.  Does the construction site provide a means to contact the police, fire department, and other relevant authorities in case of emergencies?     4. Does the construction site have a written security plan, including procedures for specific scenarios?     5. If so, are construction site employees aware of the security plan?       GENERAL MACHINERY  YES   NO  1. Are all machinery adequately marked? (Identification number, corporate logo, tags, etc.)     2. Have all the machinery been inventoried? (Serial number, brand, model, value, etc.)     3. Does the project have a list of the names of operators handling the machinery?     4. Are all the machinery fitted with immobilizers and tracking devices when appropriate?     5. Are all the machinery stored in a secure area with a proper surveillance system?     6. Are the keys to the machinery stored in a separate, secure area?      TOOLS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT  YES   NO  1. Are all power tools and hand equipment marked? (Identification number, corporate logo, tags, etc.)     2. Have all power tools and hand equipment been inventoried? (Serial number, brand, model, value, etc.)     3. Are tools and equipment fitted with tags and tracking devices when appropriate?     4. Are tools and equipment stored in a secure place?      INVENTORY CONTROL  YES   NO  1. Is there a system in place to check material inventory to ensure they are not misplaced or stolen?     2. Are there procedures in place for checking materials that go in and out of the construction site?     3. Is there a set schedule for checking materials and equipment?     4. If so, do the records show that the schedule is followed strictly?     5. Are all material suppliers arriving for delivery properly identified? (e.g license plates, driver’s license, etc)      CONSTRUCTION SITE PERIMETER  YES   NO  1. Is there a physical barrier in place to secure the site?     2. Is the number of gates kept to a minimum?     3. Are there uniformed guards at every gate to check personnel and vehicles entering and leaving the site?     4. Are security warnings displayed prominently at all entry points?     5. Are entry points adequately secured? (With  industry-grade padlocks, steel chains, etc.)     6. Is there an alarm system?     7. Is the locking system integrated with the alarm?     8. Is the site perimeter regularly inspected?     9. Are “NO TRESPASSING” signs displayed prominently along the perimeter?      LIGHTING AND SURVEILLANCE  YES   NO  1. Is there sufficient lighting on the construction site?     2. Is there a dedicated staff member assigned to check if the lighting is working properly?     3. Is the site protected by CCTV cameras?     4. Are there signs posted on site indicating the presence of security cameras?     5. Are there motion detection lights installed on-site?      INTERNAL CONTROLS  YES   NO  1. Is there a policy on employee theft?     2. Are employees aware of the policy?     3. Are employees required to check in and check out company properties when using them?     4. Are staff members encouraged to report suspicious activity?     5. Is there a hotline employees can call to report security lapses and breaches?      SITE VISITORS  YES   NO  1. Are visitors checking in and out?     2. Are vehicles entering and exiting the site recorded?      CYBERSECURITY  YES   NO  1. Are the construction site’s documents and other sensitive data stored in the cloud securely?     2. Does the company have a strong password policy?     3. Are asset-tracking data accessible online?     4. Are confidential documents and data regularly backed up?     5. Are employees well-informed about current cyberattack methods such as phishing?     Security is a serious business in construction. Because of the dangers already present on your construction site, a lapse in security can have devastating effects on your business’s operations. Not only do you risk losing money in a security breach, but more importantly, you also risk endangering the lives of your site’s personnel and third parties.  Business owners and project managers need to make a concerted effort to educate employees about security and double down on their best practices for protecting their sites.

How To Build An Insider Threat Program
How To Build An Insider Threat Program

Insider threat programs started with counter-espionage cases in the government. Today, insider threat programs have become a more common practice in all industries, as companies understand the risks associated with not having one. To build a program, you must first understand what an insider threat is. An insider threat is an employee, contractor, visitor or other insider who have been granted physical or logical access to a company that can cause extensive damage. Damage ranges from emotional or physical injury, to personnel, financial and reputational loss to data loss/manipulation or destruction of assets. Financial and confidential information While malicious insiders only make up 22% of the threats, they have the most impact on an organization Most threats are derived from the accidental insider. For example, it’s the person who is working on a competitive sales pitch on an airplane and is plugging in financial and confidential information. They are working hard, yet their company’s information is exposed to everyone around them. Another type of insider, the compromised insider, is the person who accidentally downloaded malware when clicking on a fake, urgent email, exposing their information. Malicious insiders cause the greatest concerns. These are the rogue employees who may feel threatened. They may turn violent or take action to damage the company. Or you have the criminal actor employees who are truly malicious and have been hired or bribed by another company to gather intel. Their goal is to gather data and assets to cause damage for a specific purpose. While malicious insiders only make up 22% of the threats, they have the most impact on an organization. They can cause brand and financial damage, along with physical and mental damage. Insider threat program Once you determine you need an insider threat program, you need to build a business case and support it with requirements. Depending on your industry, you can start with regulatory requirements such as HIPAA, NERC CIP, PCI, etc. Talk to your regulator and get their input. Everyone needs to be onboard, understand the intricacies of enacting a program Next, get a top to bottom risk assessment to learn your organization’s risks. A risk assessment will help you prioritize your risks and provide recommendations about what you need to include in your program. Begin by meeting with senior leadership, including your CEO to discuss expectations. Creating an insider threat program will change the company culture, and the CEO must understand the gravity of his/her decision before moving forward. Everyone needs to be onboard, understand the intricacies of enacting a program and support it before its implemented. Determining the level of monitoring The size and complexity of your company will determine the type of program needed. One size does not fit all. It will determine what technologies are required and how much personnel is needed to execute the program. The company must determine what level of monitoring is needed to meet their goals. After the leadership team decides, form a steering committee that includes someone from legal, HR and IT. Other departments can join as necessary. This team sets up the structure, lays out the plan, determines the budget and what type of technologies are needed. For small companies, the best value is education. Educate your employees about the program, build the culture and promote awareness. Teach employees about the behaviors you are looking for and how to report them. Behavioral analysis software Every company is different and you need to determine what will gain employee support The steering committee will need to decide what is out of scope. Every company is different and you need to determine what will gain employee support. The tools put in place cannot monitor employee productivity (web surfing). That is out of scope and will disrupt the company culture. What technology does your organization need to detect insider threats? Organizations need software solutions that monitor, aggregate and analyze data to identify potential threats. Behavioral analysis software looks at patterns of behavior and identifies anomalies. Use business intelligence/data analytics solutions to solve this challenge. This solution learns the normal behavior of people and notifies security staff when behavior changes. This is done by setting a set risk score. Once the score crosses a determined threshold, an alert is triggered. Case and incident management tools Predictive analytics technology reviews behaviors and identifies sensitive areas of companies (pharmacies, server rooms) or files (HR, finance, development). If it sees anomalous behavior, it can predict behaviours. It can determine if someone is going to take data. It helps companies take steps to get ahead of bad behavior. If an employee sends hostile emails, they are picked up and an alert is triggered User sentiment detection software can work in real time. If an employee sends hostile emails, they are picked up and an alert is triggered. The SOC and HR are notified and security dispatched. Depending on how a company has this process set-up, it could potentially save lives. Now that your organization has all this data, how do you pull it together? Case and incident management tools can pool data points and create threat dashboards. Cyber detection system with access control An integrated security system is recommended to be successful. It will eliminate bubbles and share data to see real-time patterns. If HR, security and compliance departments are doing investigations, they can consolidate systems into the same tool to have better data aggregation. Companies can link their IT/cyber detection system with access control. Deploying a true, integrated, open system provides a better insider threat program. Big companies should invest in trained counterintelligence investigators to operate the program. They can help identify the sensitive areas, identify who the people are that have the most access to them, or are in a position to do the greatest amount of harm to the company and who to put mitigation plans around to protect them. They also run the investigations. Potential risky behavior Using the right technology along with thorough processes will result in a successful program You need to detect which individuals are interacting with information systems that pose the greatest potential risk. You need to rapidly and thoroughly understand the user’s potential risky behavior and the context around it. Context is important. You need to decide what to investigate and make it clear to employees. Otherwise you will create a negative culture at your company. Develop a security-aware culture. Involve the crowd. Get an app so if someone sees something they can say something. IT should not run the insider threat program. IT is the most privileged department in an organization. If something goes wrong with an IT person, they have the most ability to do harm and cover their tracks. They need to be an important partner, but don’t let them have ownership and don’t let their administrators have access. Educating your employees and creating a positive culture around an insider threat program takes time and patience. Using the right technology along with thorough processes will result in a successful program. It’s okay to start small and build.

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Mission 500 Announces A Security 5k/2k Fundraiser At ISC West 2020
Mission 500 Announces A Security 5k/2k Fundraiser At ISC West 2020

Mission 500 is excited to announce this year’s Security 5k/2k fundraiser at ISC West 2020 will be held on Thursday, March 19th. The event will be located at 2601 East Sunset Road, in Las Vegas, Nevada and will benefit children and families in need across the United States. Registrations to participate in this year’s event are open. Those who are unable to attend or participate in the physical event can sign up and donate as a virtual runner or walker. Wide array of new security industry participants “2020 marks our eleventh year hosting the Security 5k/2k and we want to thank all of the previous participants and sponsors who have made the last ten years a tremendous success,” said Tom Nolan, Director of Strategic Partnerships, Mission 500. We can’t wait for this year’s event and hope to meet a wide array of new security industry participants" “We can’t wait for this year’s event and hope to meet a wide array of new security industry participants, reconnect with prior ones, and have a great time while supporting this worthwhile cause.” Participants in the Mission 500 Security 5k/2k will be awarded for their performance across various age categories, as well as those companies and individuals who led the fundraising effort. Humanitarian awards ceremony Those who succeed in raising $500 or more will automatically be enrolled in Mission 500’s 500 Club and receive a jacket as recognition for their efforts. The Security 5k/2k Reception and Mission 500’s CSR and Humanitarian Awards Ceremony will take place Thursday afternoon after the race (time and location to be announced). Confirmed charter sponsors include Alarm.com, Altronix Corporation, Axis Communications, Bosch Security Systems, BRINKS Home Security, CMAC, COPS Monitoring, Dahua Technology, DMP, Freeman, Galaxy Control Systems, HID Global, Hikvision, LENSEC, LRG Marketing Communications, Milestone Systems, Napco Starlink, PSA Security Network, Safety Technology International, Inc., and ZKTeco USA. The race is operated by Las Vegas Running Company, a locally based race management company.

ONVIF Reflects On 2019 Activities And Plans For New Profile Development In Annual Meeting
ONVIF Reflects On 2019 Activities And Plans For New Profile Development In Annual Meeting

ONVIF, a global standardization initiative for IP-based physical security products, held its annual membership meeting in November, providing ONVIF members with an overview of important activities of 2019 and plans for the year ahead. Attendees heard presentations on the growth of ONVIF, as well as plans for new profile development. ONVIF Chairman Per Björkdahl highlighted the forum’s achievements over the past year, particularly the market’s continued support for the profile concept, with the number of conformant products surpassing 13,000 earlier this year. With six profiles to choose from and additional ones in development, ONVIF profiles have increasingly been included in various bid and specification processes in projects around the world, making it the de-facto interface in the industry. Björkdahl also noted the continued involvement of ONVIF in the International Electrotechnical Commission’s work on international standardization, in addition to new proposals for cloud connectivity and interoperability between multiple systems. Video Enhancement Working Group The overarching goal of ONVIF is to provide to the market a single interface through which every system can operate As is tradition, ONVIF recognized the contributions of multiple individuals from various ONVIF committees. Steve Wolf, who served on several ONVIF committees on behalf of Pelco, received the ONVIF Service Award, which acknowledges individuals who have provided a long-term commitment to the organization. While serving on the Technical Committee, Wolf led the Security Working Group, and was also an active participant in the Video Enhancement Working Group, contributing to a number of improvements in how ONVIF approaches video. Andreas Schneider of Sony received the ONVIF Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to ONVIF over many years in multiple functions. Schneider’s long-term service to the Technical Services Committee has positioned him as a major facilitator of the ONVIF organization, with contributions to multiple ONVIF profiles. Physical access control standards “The overarching goal of ONVIF is to provide to the market a single interface through which every system can operate,” said Björkdahl. “Our honorees have shown significant and long-term commitment to our organization, in turn making this goal a reality one profile at a time. We thank both of our recipients for their innovation, hard work and service.” ONVIF Technical Committee Chairman, Hans Busch of Bosch, spoke to members about the specification development roadmap, which highlights plans for future profile development, as well as the continued alignment to the standardization activities within the IEC TC 79 working groups for video surveillance and physical access control standards. Specifically, Busch covered what specifications are being examined for future profiles, and how they complement and further enhance existing ONVIF profiles. IP-based physical security products ONVIF continues to work with its members to expand the number of IP interoperability solutionsAs chair of the Technical Services Committee, Sony’s Schneider gave an overview of the committee’s work on new and existing profiles, client and device test tools, updates to the conformance process and tools, and the Developers’ Plugfest. Shi-lin Chan of Axis Communications, who serves as chair of the ONVIF Communication Committee, provided a recap of ONVIF communication efforts in 2019, and discussed ONVIF’s plans for the launch of a Mandarin website later this year. Founded in 2008, ONVIF is a well-recognized industry forum driving interoperability for IP-based physical security products. The organization has a global member base of established camera, video management system and access control companies and more than 13,000 profile conformant products. IP interoperability solutions ONVIF offers Profile S for streaming video; Profile G for recording and storage; Profile C for physical access control; Profile Q for improved out-of-the-box functionality, Profile A for broader access control configuration and Profile T for advanced streaming. ONVIF continues to work with its members to expand the number of IP interoperability solutions ONVIF conformant products can provide.

Open Security & Safety Alliance Celebrates Its 1st Anniversary In The Security Industry
Open Security & Safety Alliance Celebrates Its 1st Anniversary In The Security Industry

The Open Security & Safety Alliance (OSSA), an industry body comprised of leaders, influencers and innovative organizations from all facets within the security, safety and building automation space, celebrates its one-year anniversary. Within its first 12 months, OSSA attracted 30+ members ranging from device manufacturers, software developers and system integrators to distributors and system on a chip (SoC) companies – helping lay the groundwork for improved security, safety, building automation and business intelligence solutions. Open security and safety ecosystem We’re truly pleased at the progress achieved in just our first year by establishing an open security and safety ecosystem" “Through OSSA, we have competing and complementary institutions reaching across aisles and stepping outside of their brands to work together to push our whole industry into a new, more prosperous and efficient direction,” said Johan Jubbega, President, Open Security & Safety Alliance. “We’re truly pleased at the progress achieved in just our first year by establishing an open security and safety ecosystem comprised of 30+ renown companies, and having a market-changing digital marketplace and first commercially available video security camera offerings underway for year two as the Alliance continues to provide guidance and interpretation of common standards and specifications to promote more intelligent, productive solutions for users.” Operation and maintenance of products Currently, security and safety solutions are fragmented and there is no collaborative approach to systems working together for bigger-picture success. Large amounts of data are left untapped in siloed systems that through cooperation can instead be utilized for better living, safety and security purposes. OSSA’s mission is to work with market players to all start from the same ‘recipe’ when it comes to the development, deployment, operation and maintenance of products, software and services. The Alliance’s vision is that the majority of the security and safety industry works with a common, vendor-agnostic operating system (OS) and IoT infrastructure – and agrees to implement or adhere to common approaches defined for common challenges like data security, privacy, product performance and easy consumption of data across multiple solutions. Collaborative digital marketplace They also started to define the common approaches and establishment of a shared IoT infrastructure This will substantially fuel usability and trust when it comes to security and safety solutions that are built on the foundations set forth by OSSA. From there, companies can differentiate through apps by way of a collaborative digital marketplace – similar to how we all access/download/use applications between an app store and our smart phones and other digital devices.   Already within its first year, OSSA member companies created the first common Technology Stack specification including the definition of a common operating system for video security devices. They also started to define the common approaches and establishment of a shared IoT infrastructure, including a digital marketplace. This framework allows the trapped – and mostly unused – data captured by any brand of device to be unleashed and available for good purpose. It also reduces friction when conceiving, deploying and maintaining security and safety devices, systems and settings and inspires innovation by opening the doors to data interpretation and possibilities. This platform revolution that OSSA envisions will benefit everyone involved. Significant outputs from Alliance workgroups Significant outputs from Alliance workgroups over the past 12 months include: Documentation of a common Technology Stack including the definition of a common vendor-agnostic OS. First description of a common market approach to data security and privacy. OSSA member Security and Safety Things GmbH (SAST) realized a first version of its OS as set forth in the common Technology Stack defined by OSSA – enabling the creation of prototype cameras. Together with SAST’s first open app store for security cameras, various innovative applications were showcased this year from ISC West 2019, IFSEC 2019 and GSX 2019. The commercial launch of the platform is planned for Q1 2020. OSSA members fulfilled their first prototype cameras based on the commonly defined Technology Stack and OS, and showcased them throughout 2019 at ISC West, IFSEC and last week from GSX. Change for the betterment of the industry The Open Security & Safety Alliance’s five founding companies – Bosch Building Technologies, Hanwha Techwin, Milestone Systems, Pelco™ and VIVOTEK Inc – are joined by 25+ other inventive international players that currently comprise the OSSA member roster. The Alliance is designed to include everyone and offers membership levels to meet the needs of companies big or small. Benefits of joining OSSA include access to the Alliance framework and the ability to connect, discuss, influence and collaborate with other Alliance members to steer change for the betterment of the industry.