Bosch Benefits From Increasing Awareness For Its Access Control Solutions
Bosch Benefits From Increasing Awareness For Its Access Control Solutions

Following the Security 2010 exhibition in Essen, Germany, it is evident that Bosch is receiving increased awareness for its investment in the access control and integrated systems markets. While the Bosch booth has traditionally been popular for its video, communications, intrusion detection, and fire prevention solutions, this year Bosch saw an exponential increase of interest in the access control and integrated systems offerings, making it yet one of the areas of highest growth potential.In Essen, Bosch showcased its complete portfolio of access control and integrated systems solutions. Customers were able to see and experience solutions for small, mid-sized and large environments: the Access Easy Control System supporting up to 32 readers, the reliable 128-reader Access Professional Edition system, and the Building Integration System (BIS) software. The BIS software system is used to connect all security, safety, and building automation components and to integrate them into one central and comprehensive management system.Further to the enhancement of the portfolio itself, Bosch is increasing its market presence with additional service offerings and more trained marketing and salespeople to answer the growing demand. According to Alex Squarize, Bosch Security Systems, "Bosch is absolutely in a good position for future growth. The investment in research and development over the past years has already started to pay off. We are adding to our portfolio day after day, while we continue to invest into training and development of our employees. No other company in the market is currently investing as much into access control and integrated systems solutions.""The future outlook remains positive", Squarize continues. "We are currently seeing more and more implementations of these Bosch solutions, and we are experiencing substantial growth in both geographical reach and quantity. We look forward to 2011 with optimism!"Download PDF of Bosch Access Easy Control system

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The New Age Of Access Control From Bosch
The New Age Of Access Control From Bosch

Access control has become a vital component of any security concept worldwide. The protection of intellectual property rights, prevention of theft and sabotage or simply compliance requirements - there are a multitude of reasons why companies of all kinds need to use a comprehensive access control system to restrict, manage and control access to their facilities. However, operated in isolation from other safety and security systems, even the most sophisticated access control system cannot really live up to its promises. In such an environment, operation and monitoring can quickly turn into a nightmare, as each system has its own architecture, its own user interface and its own management tool. This is why more and more organizations are looking out for an access control solution that easily integrates with video monitoring, intrusion detection and sometimes even visitor management to form a homogeneous security system with a consistent user interface and central management and operations.Moreover, suppliers are more and more often faced with requirements of their customers to supply a documentation of all access attempts, whether successful or not, to protect against industrial espionage. To fulfill this requirement, not only employee access must be captured and recorded, but also the entire visitor traffic. Video integration for more safetyWhile modern access control systems allow an efficient management of access rights, they are rather powerless against abuse if operated on their own. In critical environments it is mandatory to add a second layer of security by integrating access control with some kind of video surveillance. To prevent abuse, all access requests can then trigger one or more video cameras. Integrated systems can provide alarm verification, instantly displaying live video images from nearby cameras when there is an alarm event at a door - such as when a person presents an unauthorized credential or when a door is forced open. Forensics can also benefit from such integration if the video recordings are referenced in the access control system's event log. Such a feature greatly facilitates identification, retrieval and playback of past events and alarms if necessary.Open standards ease integrationIntegrating access control, video monitoring, and intrusion detection can be rather easy when all components come from the same vendor and if this vendor also offers a management platform like the Building Integration System from Bosch for all of them. Integrated systems "off the shelf" can greatly ease installation and configuration of the security solution. Logical integration eliminates the need for multiple software platform and interfaces -- resulting in fewer complications and greater event-driven functionality as well as reduced installation time and costs. What's more, this kind of integration also promises more efficient operation and a clearly reduced need for training, but above all also a higher security level. An open standards-based management system even makes sense in those cases where one vendor supplies everything, as it opens up the entire installation for future expansion.User interface is keyAn integrated security system is a very complex apparatus, and if this complexity is not hidden from the user, the system will be highly prone to human error and maloperation. Such systems do need very clear and intuitive user interfaces, avoiding information overload while offering all the information that is currently needed. This is even more important when several components or dialogs are open, which will often be the case if you deal with access control, video surveillance and maybe intrusion detection from the same console.

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Extended Set Of Benefits: New Version Of Building Integration System From Bosch To Be Launched
Extended Set Of Benefits: New Version Of Building Integration System From Bosch To Be Launched

Including interface advancements, enlarged vendor independency and compatibility with the latest Windows Internet Explorer 9, Bosch Security Systems introduces a number of updates to its Building Integration System (BIS). The new version 2.5, which is available from early May 2012, increases the range of supported devices to more than 1,000 different third party cameras and encoders, making it suitable for even the most complex integration projects. The new system allows further optimized security, safety and communication management in one front-end system with customized user interface. The range of video devices supported by BIS 2.5 is unmatched in the industry. It seamlessly interoperates with virtually any video camera, connecting to the latest IP cameras on the market with HD and H.264 encoding technology. The Divar 700 and Bosch Recording Station are supported in their most recent versions. BIS 2.5 benefits installers and end users alike: certified BIS partners and systems integrators enjoy an upgraded level of customization options, such as new layout formats for a wide range of monitor sizes (including 16:9 and 16:10). Thanks to numerous handy improvements, such as useful additions to the symbol libraries, it is now even easier to personalize the system. BIS 2.5 is interoperable with the large variety of ONVIF-compatible, modern IP-based video products supplied by all major manufacturers. ONVIF ensures a uniform standard, allowing customers to choose the product that best fits their individual needs, without having to worry about compatibility. It thereby saves costs and allows long term planning. The ONVIF standard was first introduced by a consortium of companies, including founding member Bosch, in 2008.

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Access Professional Edition 2.1
Access Professional Edition 2.1

Bosch Security Systems further enhances its widely-used access control solution for small and medium-sized companies with the Access Professional Edition (APE) 2.1 which will be released soon. Thanks to new interfaces, an even larger number of devices and operating systems are now compatible.Since its initial launch, the easy-to-use, scalable access control software APE meets an extensive range of security requirements and assures an easy integration of access control with a variety of security functions, such as CCTV, intrusion detection or elevator management. In its updated version, APE features an optimized support of the most common operating systems, such as Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and Windows XP. Furthermore it enables a seamless interconnectivity with Bosch HD cameras and the midrange recorders Divar 400 and Divar 600.With APE, Bosch offers a multifunctional, extremely reliable yet flexible solution for a variety of small to midsized establishments such as office buildings, laboratories, schools or the likes. The system is capable of handling up to 10.000 cardholders. In total 128 readers and 128 cameras can be managed. The access modes ‘card', ‘pin' or ‘card and pin' provide individual levels of security."APE is very popular with our clients, as it caters to all common security requirements and offers a number of additional, handy features", says Patrick Looijmans at Bosch Security Systems. By displaying the database photo and a live image recorded at the door, as well as basic cardholder data with the time stamp of access request for example, the software helps the operator to instantly verify that card and cardholder are matching. Also a fast tracking of persons in the building is possible, which is particularly helpful in case of an emergency. Using the integrated card configuration function furthermore increases the security as badges can be designed according to corporate guidelines and persons can be identified throughout the entire premises. "All in all APE is a modern, straightforward all-round solution, which just got even better in its latest version 2.1", says Patrick Looijmans.

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Access control software - Expert commentary

Strengthening The Physical And Cyber Barriers Around Critical Infrastructure
Strengthening The Physical And Cyber Barriers Around Critical Infrastructure

It has long been recognized that no one is safe from cyber-attacks, but some sectors face a much higher level of threat than others. Critical infrastructure sectors such as utilities, energy and industrial manufacturing are some of those that face an intense level of interest from cyber criminals and nation-state groups across the globe. The impacts of a successful attack can have detrimental consequences, for both the cyber and physical side of the business, in terms of business disruption, economic dips and other real-life consequences. Compromise of ICS and SCADA systems One of the greatest risks to these critical infrastructure sectors is the compromise of ICS and SCADA systems inside operational technology environments (OT environments). Attackers can move laterally from IT networks to OT environments, with the potential to cause even greater damage or disruption. But even those attackers, who solely focus on compromising IT environments, are still able to trigger major disruption, by disabling day-to-day processes that are involved in the production and roll-out of solutions and services. Rise in cyber-attacks on utility and energy sector Recent events have shown that attacks on the utility and energy sector are ramping up Recent events have shown that attacks on the utility and energy sector are ramping up. The attack on the US Colonial Pipeline, for example, was one of the most high-profile breaches in the industry’s history, particularly when considering the secondary, physical consequences. The decision to shut down the Colonial Pipeline, while considered necessary, triggered a wave of disruption, leading to gasoline shortages and inflated costs. This is just one example of the serious effects that a successful cyber breach can have on an organization. Ransomware-based attacks Often financially motivated, one of the most common methods that cyber criminals increasingly opt for is ransomware-based attacks, as they are an effective way of blackmailing organizations into handing over valuable credentials or completing financial transactions. Once armed with the company credentials, threat actors can then post a sale of access to compromised networks on underground criminal forums. Armed with stolen credentials and therefore, access to the network, adversaries can then move laterally across the IT systems in OT environments. The ability to travel laterally is a sign of poor network segmentation on the business side between IT and OT networks. Malicious links in phishing emails If files are encrypted by criminals within both environments, businesses are faced with double the amount of disruption. This can lead to companies having to shut down operations, even if just as a precaution, just like in the case of the Colonial Pipeline. Malicious links included in phishing emails are another simple and highly effective method used by criminals to compromise company networks. While there are many security solutions that defend against common phishing attempts, criminal activity is becoming far more advanced, to the point where they are able to bypass standard security systems and gain access to the most sensitive of files. Why critical infrastructure is targeted Common forms of attack involve theft of personally identifiable information (PII) of customers and employees Businesses within the utilities and energy sectors often hold data deemed highly valuable by threat actors, including both basic criminal gangs and advanced nation-state operatives. Common forms of attack involve theft of personally identifiable information (PII) of customers and employees, either for further exploitation or to sell on the dark web. However, motivations can develop far beyond the usual common criminal. Nation-states have also taken great interest in these industries to steal competitive intelligence, in order to gain market advantages over foreign competitors. States including Russia, Iran and China, have all been suspected of targeting competitor countries in the critical infrastructure markets. Cyber threats posed by nation-states Aside from gaining a competitive edge, nations have also been known to engage in these cyber battles as forms of retaliation for previous attacks, or to get one-over on rivals. For example, it’s been recognized that motivations behind Iranian actions on the energy sector are due to the value of oil and gas in being central to the Iranian economy, and international efforts against their nuclear program. Other Iranian actors have focused their efforts on water infrastructures and attempted to compromise chlorine levels in Israeli water supplies back in 2020. The chlorine levels would have been reset to toxic levels, which could have had devastating physical consequences. On the other hand, motivations in China have revolved around competitive intelligence and intellectual property for cyber espionage. The data is subsequently used to advance economic growth in different industries. Physical and digital disruptions Due to the nature of these industries, in addition to companies facing business disruption and loss of customer trust, consequences could span beyond the digital side of the business. As outlined above, these attacks on utilities and other industrial organizations can result in physical damage, as well as digital disruption. Unlike other markets, utilities are directly involved in people’s lives, and any attack on a company will impact individuals through a domino effect. The incident with an Iranian actor attempting to sabotage chlorine levels in an Israeli water supply is a prime example of this. While the attack was against the water provider itself, the consequences could have been harmful to the wider population, who rely on the water supply. Again, the Colonial Pipeline attack had consequences that expanded beyond the targeted company. Inflated prices and fuel shortages impacted all customers at the end of the supply chain. Attacks on any critical infrastructure could cause both short and long-term physical impacts, including blackouts, disrupted energy supply, and even physical harm to individuals. Need for a multi-layered defense solution The best way to deal with these forms of cyber-attacks is to bring everything right back to basics The best way to deal with these forms of cyber-attacks is to bring everything right back to basics. In most cases, criminals carry out their attacks by first gaining access to IT networks through the usual means of phishing emails and malicious links. Organizations should, therefore, ensure they have a multi-layered defense solution implemented, including advanced email security. There are a number of features that these solutions should deploy, including spam filters to prevent malicious emails from actually making it to the inbox. Sandbox analysis is also critical for scrutinizing email attachments, especially for external senders and emails containing suspicious file formats. These solutions should feature rules that block the execution of macros in Microsoft Office attachments to emails from senders outside the organization. Enhancing cyber security with encryption and authentication Additional features to help prevent lateral movement through the network are also worth considering. Demilitarized zones (DMZs) are also often used to divide IT and OT networks, as part of segmentation efforts and have proven to be highly effective. Further solutions such as encryption and authentication requirements will help restrict adversaries’ access to different areas of the network, should they be successful in breaching the defense line. Everyone should be involved in maintaining an organization’s line of defense. Education and training are vital, as employers can arm workers with the tools to spot and remove malicious emails, should any make it through the line of defense. Educating employees on enterprise security Human workers are often considered the weak point in a company’s cyber security, often due to lack of understanding of the risks. Keeping employees informed and educated will prove beneficial to the security of an organization in the long run.

How Body Worn Cameras And AI Can Curb The Issue Of Abusive Behavior
How Body Worn Cameras And AI Can Curb The Issue Of Abusive Behavior

Amongst the many negative consequences of the pandemic is a rise in violent and abusive behavior across society. Health workers have experienced it on a regular basis. So too have police officers and public transport workers. Unfortunately, violence and abuse towards shop workers is also endemic in British society. To address this problem which, in truth, has been on the rise since long before the emergence of COVID-19, we need better deterrents. The ability to prosecute these offenses is one such deterrent, but just as important is the ability to deescalate situations before they spill over into unacceptable or unlawful behavior. Major retail customers In both instances, organizations of all sizes are now recognizing that the answer could involve greater use of rapidly advancing body worn camera technology. Andy Marsh, the Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Police, is one of the police officers responsible for introducing body worn cameras to the UK police force, where they are now in widespread use. Andy Marsh is one of the police officers responsible for introducing body worn cameras to the UK police force He explains that “The reason the majority of people don’t speed or drink-drive is that rational human beings weigh up the risk and consequences of breaking the law and getting caught. Body worn cameras help provide appropriate ‘desistance’, especially where there are forward-facing screens so the person interacting with the wearer can see themselves and their behavior.” Evidence shows that if a forward-facing camera is switched on before the intervention becomes hostile, it will generally lead to a de-escalation – as often as 90% of the time, according to one of our major retail customers. Digital evidence investigations Only a tiny handful of abusive incidents ever translate into arrests and prosecutions. A key issue is a lack of clear evidence – how to get past the usual impasse of one person’s word against the other. Body worn cameras break the deadlock and allow organizations to report incidents to the police with confidence, knowing that they will lead to action. Marsh suggests that “We usually see an earlier admission, an earlier guilty plea and a more appropriate sentence, where body worn camera footage is in play.” The technology has come on in leaps and bounds in recent years. For example, it’s now possible to record high-definition footage on a lightweight device that’s barely the size of a palm. And it’s not just about the evidence organizations gather themselves. Many police forces are looking at ways to make it easier for businesses and the public to collaborate on digital evidence investigations. Body worn cameras This is good for the victims of crime because it means we get the evidence more quickly" “We’ve created an online crime portal in Avon and Somerset which people can use to pass digital evidence and material to us without an officer having to attend their premises. This is good for the victims of crime because it means we get the evidence more quickly and can take action more swiftly to resolve that issue,” adds Marsh. Our body worn cameras can now even support facial recognition thanks to new, smart AI on the devices themselves, which can scan and process faces within a three-meter distance against a pre-defined database of people (which we call a watchlist). Any matches trigger alerts or additional camera activity such as recording and streaming, while the facial recognition data of people not on the watchlist itself is not recorded or saved to assuage privacy concerns. Similar criminal behavior Where could this technology come in handy? Well, staff at gambling venues or in-store retail workers could undoubtedly benefit from the ability to quickly spot known fraudsters or addicts who have requested that venues refuse their custom. Stewards at mass sporting events could play a key role in helping to identify people who have been banned from attending. The primary reason for using body worn cameras is to increase the safety of frontline workers The primary reason for using body worn cameras is to increase the safety of frontline workers, deescalating confrontations and limiting the use of force. AI-powered facial recognition can also serve this purpose by helping them make better-informed choices about how to handle specific situations. For example, it is a massive advantage to police officers on the beat to understand that the person they are dealing with may have a history of similar criminal behavior. Facial recognition technology But it’s also an advantage within retail, where aggressive incidents are on the rise and staff need all the help they can get to determine what an appropriate response should be to a particular customer incident. In fact, extensive consultation with our retail, police, transport and gambling customers indicates that introducing facial recognition technology to body worn cameras could be instrumental, not just in helping to prevent crime, but in tracking down vulnerable and missing people too. Of course, facial recognition technology has to be balanced against the need to protect the privacy of ordinary citizens. Video recording using body worn cameras has to be done proportionately – the same is true for the use of facial recognition technology. The technology also has to be compliant with GDPR, Data Protection, the Information Commissioners recommendations and so on. Positive working environment Violent and abusive incidents affect everyone in the immediate vicinity and create a culture of fear Importantly, it should be for a specific, proportionate and justifiable reason which, of course, means it should never be used for indiscriminate mass surveillance. Every organization using this technology must remember that a facial recognition system match is not proof of someone’s identity, but rather, an indication of likelihood to help inform the user rather than dictate the course of action. Violent and abusive incidents affect everyone in the immediate vicinity and create a culture of fear and apprehension. This is why it’s so important to get on top of the problem – both on a societal and at an organizational level. Body worn cameras have a vital role to play, as an evidence-gathering tool and as a deterrent that empowers the wearer and creates a more positive working environment. Deterring unlawful behavior One of the critical roles these cameras play is in staff training, providing real-world video evidence that can be used to educate and upskill workers across a variety of industries. Society’s problem with abusive and violent behavior cannot be solved by technology alone. But with exceptional quality camera footage now a reality, and the possibility of AI technology at the device level in real-time, body worn cameras will only get better at deterring unlawful behavior and helping to protect hardworking frontline staff. Alasdair Field is CEO of video technology provider Reveal, which works with UK police forces and major brands such as Matalan, JD Sports and Boots to help them improve staff safety, deescalate confrontations and reduce violent and abusive incidents.

What You Need To Know About Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) For Emergency Preparedness?
What You Need To Know About Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) For Emergency Preparedness?

Have you ever stopped to consider the volume of new data created daily on social media? It’s staggering. Take Twitter, for instance. Approximately 500 million tweets are published every day, adding up to more than 200 billion posts per year. On Facebook, users upload an additional 350 million photos per day, and on YouTube, nearly 720,000 hours of new video content is added every 24 hours. While this overwhelming volume of information may be of no concern to your average social media user posting updates to keep up with family and friends, it’s of particular interest to corporate security and safety professionals who are increasingly using it to monitor current events and detect potential risks around their people and locations—all in real-time. Meet the fast-paced and oft-confusing world of open-source intelligence (OSINT). What is Open Source Intelligence (OSINT)? The U.S. Department of State defines OSINT as, “intelligence that is produced from publicly available information and is collected, exploited, and disseminated promptly to an appropriate audience to address a specific intelligence requirement.” The concept of monitoring and leveraging publicly available information sources for intelligence purposes dates back to the 1930s. The British Broadcast Corporation (BBC) was approached by the British government and asked to develop a new service that would capture and analyze print journalism from around the world. Monitoring and identifying potential threats Originally named the “Digest of Foreign Broadcast, the service (later renamed BBC Monitoring which still exists today) captured and analyzed nearly 1.25 million broadcast words every day to help British intelligence officials keep tabs on conversations taking place abroad and what foreign governments were saying to their constituents. OSINT encompasses any publicly accessible information that can be used to monitor and identify potential threats Today, OSINT broadly encompasses any publicly accessible information that can be used to monitor and identify potential threats and/or relevant events with the potential to impact safety or business operations. The potential of OSINT data is extraordinary. Not only can it enable security and safety teams to quickly identify pertinent information that may pose a material risk to their business or people, but it can also be captured by anyone with the right set of tools and training. OSINT for cybersecurity and physical threat detection Whether it be a significant weather event, supply chain disruptions, or a world health crisis few saw coming, the threats facing organizations continue to increase in size and scale. Luckily, OSINT has been able to accelerate how organizations detect, validate, and respond to these threats, and it has proved invaluable in reducing risk and informing decision-making – especially during emergencies. OSINT is typically shared in real-time, so once a situation is reported, security teams can then work on verifying critical details such as the location or time an incident occurred or provide the most up-to-date information about rapidly developing events on the ground. They can then continue to monitor online chatter about the crisis, increasing their situational awareness and speeding up their incident response times. OSINT applications OSINT can help detect when sensitive company information may have been accessed by hackers  Severe weather offers a good example of OSINT in action. Say an organization is located in the Great Plains. They could use OSINT from sources like the National Weather Service or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to initiate emergency communications to employees about tornado warnings, high winds, or other dangerous conditions as they are reported. Another common use case for OSINT involves data breaches and cyber-attacks. OSINT can help detect when sensitive company information may have been accessed by hackers by monitoring dark web messaging boards and forums. In 2019, T-Cellphone suffered a data breach that affected more than a million customers, but it was able to quickly alert affected users after finding their personal data online. OSINT is a well-established field with countless applications. Unfortunately, in an ever-changing digital world, it’s not always enough to help organizations weather a crisis. Why OSINT alone isn’t enough? One of the core challenges with leveraging OSINT data, especially social media intelligence (SOCMINT), is that much of it is unstructured and spread across many disparate sources, making it difficult to sort through, manage, and organize. Consider the social media statistics above. Assuming a business wanted to monitor all conversations on Twitter to ensure all relevant information was captured, it would need to both capture and analyze 500 million individual posts every day. Assuming a trained analyst spent just three seconds analyzing each post, that would amount to 1.5 billion seconds of labor—equivalent to 416,666 hours—just to keep pace. While technology and filters can greatly reduce the burden and help organizations narrow the scope of their analysis, it’s easy to see how quickly human capital constraints can limit the utility of OSINT data—even for the largest companies. Challenges with OSINT OSINT data collection includes both passive and active techniques, each requiring a different level of effort and skill Additionally, collecting OSINT data is time-consuming and resource-intensive. Making sense of it remains a highly specialized skill set requiring years of training. In an emergency where every second count, the time required to sift through copious amounts of information takes far longer than the time in which an organization must take meaningful action to alter the outcome. Compounding the issue, OSINT data is noisy and difficult to filter. Even trained analysts find the need to constantly monitor, search, and filter voluminous troves of unstructured data tedious. Artificial intelligence and machine learning have helped weed through some of this data faster, but for organizations with multiple locations tasked with monitoring hundreds or thousands of employees, it’s still a challenging task. Adding to the complexity, collecting OSINT data isn’t easy. OSINT data collection includes both passive and active techniques, each requiring a different level of effort and skill. Passive vs Active OSINT Passive OSINT is typically anonymous and meant to avoid drawing attention to the person requesting the information. Scrolling user posts on public social media profiles is a good example of passive OSINT. Active OSINT refers to information proactively sought out, but it often requires a more purposeful effort to retrieve it. That may mean specific login details are needed to access a website where information is stored. Lastly, unverified OSINT data can’t always be trusted. Analysts often encounter false positives or fake reports, which not only take time to confirm accuracy, but if they act on misinformation, the result could be damage to their organization’s reputation or worse. So, how can companies take advantage of it without staffing an army of analysts or creating operational headaches? A new path for OSINT Organisations can leverage the benefits of OSINT to improve situational awareness and aid decision-making Fortunately, organizations can leverage the benefits of OSINT to improve situational awareness and aid decision-making without hiring a dedicated team of analysts to comb through the data. By combining OSINT data with third-party threat intelligence solutions, organizations can get a cleaner, more actionable view of what’s happening in the world. Threat intelligence solutions not only offer speed by monitoring for only the most relevant events 24/7/365, but they also offer more comprehensive coverage of a wide range of threat types. What’s more, the data is often verified and married with location intelligence to help organizations better understand if, how, and to what extent each threat poses a risk to their people, facilities, and assets. In a world with a never-ending stream of information available, learning how to parse and interpret it becomes all the more important. OSINT is a necessary piece to any organization’s threat intelligence and monitoring system, but it can’t be the only solution. Paired with external threat intelligence tools, OSINT can help reduce risk and keep employees safe during emergencies and critical events.

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Intelligent Truck Parking Solution From Bosch Protects Driver And Freight
Intelligent Truck Parking Solution From Bosch Protects Driver And Freight

From asphalt to apps, Bosch has implemented a connected security solution for the Frechen truck stop near the A1 to protect people and freight from assaults. The modern parking area near Cologne now has around 40 parking spaces that meet the high-security standards of the Transported Asset Protection Association’s (TAPA) according to the Level 2 certificate and are therefore particularly secured.  From now on, forwarding companies can book these via the Bosch Secure Truck Parking app. The fully connected solution ensures maximum security: more than 20 security cameras with intelligent video analytics by Bosch monitor the four-gated entrances and exits as well as the parking area.  In addition, a pedestrian interlock ensures that only authorized persons can enter the area. The reason for this solution is a shortage of some 400.000 secured truck parking spaces in Europe. This has serious consequences for the safety of drivers, goods manufacturers, freight forwarders as well as other road users, as trucks often have to park in an unsafe manner contrary to traffic regulations. Secure truck parking  "The truck parking shortage along German roads is, unfortunately, a daily occurrence. Everyone has seen the lines of unsafely parked trucks along the highways. The fact that thieves, in particular, take advantage of the precarious situation is felt by companies like us that transport goods throughout Europe," explains Rein de Vries, Senior Manager Security from Samsung SDS.  In close coordination with Samsung SDS, Bosch has developed the solution that has now been implemented. "Secured truck parking lots, just like the one in Frechen, are important for our transport of goods. That's why we were happy to contribute with our know-how and experience to this project." A loss of 8.2 billion a year With AI-based video analytics, the security cameras immediately detect risks, unwanted movements, and sound A recent study by TAPA illustrates the urgency of the situation: The organization estimates the financial damage caused by stolen freight across Europe at around 8.2 billion euros annually. Alongside the United Kingdom, Germany is one of the countries most affected by cargo theft. Thieves usually take advantage of the situation at night, when the truck is parked unprotected and the driver is asleep. Consumer goods or car parts are among the most sought-after goods, as are jewelry, precious metals, or food products. Bundled know-how  "On behalf of the site operator, we acted as general contractor to implement a certified complete solution for the Frechen truck stop that protects drivers and freight alike," explains Uwe B. Herrmann, project manager at Bosch Building Technologies.  "The parking lot is now securely enclosed, gated, illuminated in a way that saves energy and equipped with intelligent technology."  AI ensures safety and comfort  With the help of AI-based video analytics, the security cameras immediately detect risks and unwanted movements and sound the alarm at the Bosch video control center.  Audio technology built-in video cameras allow control center staff to immediately contact people on the premises and notify security forces or police if necessary. Regular virtual guard tours round off the security concept.  Booking parking spaces also work efficiently and digitally: Parking spaces can be booked via the Bosch Secure Truck Parking web portal or app. Truck drivers can pass through the barrier and drive onto the premises with digital license plate recognition.

Bosch Appoints Thomas Quante As The CEO And Tanja Rückert As The Chief Digital Officer
Bosch Appoints Thomas Quante As The CEO And Tanja Rückert As The Chief Digital Officer

Thomas Quante (54) will take over as President of the Bosch Building Technologies division on June 1, 2021. As a board member for the division, he was previously responsible for the international system integrator business as well as for the fire alarm systems business within the global product business. Innovative AIoT solutions Quante succeeds Dr. Tanja Rückert (51), who will become Chief Digital Officer of the Bosch Group on July 1, 2021. "In the field of safety, security and building technology, we are operating in a very exciting and dynamic market environment.” I am very pleased to be playing a key role in shaping this development" “Due to the growing integration of artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things, we see enormous potential for innovative AIoT solutions and intelligent services that provide even more energy efficiency, comfort, security and safety for our customers. I am very pleased to be playing a key role in shaping this development," explains Thomas Quante. International system integrator Quante, who has a degree in business administration, began his career in 1994 at Robert Bosch GmbH and has worked as an executive with strategic and operational responsibilities in various Bosch divisions in Germany and abroad. Quante has broad experience in the B2B sector as well as in-depth market and customer knowledge in building and security & safety technology. Joining Bosch Building Technologies in 2012, Quante initially headed the international business for professional communication and audio systems based in Burnsville, USA. In 2015, he became a member of the board for Bosch Building Technologies, where he played a key role in establishing and successfully developing the international system integrator business.

ESX 2021 Virtual Experience To Feature An Educational Program For The Electronic Security Industry
ESX 2021 Virtual Experience To Feature An Educational Program For The Electronic Security Industry

The Electronic Security Expo (ESX) Virtual Experience, presented by the Electronic Security Association (ESA), will be held on June 15-17, featuring notable keynotes, industry experts, and 24 sessions with interactive learning opportunities. ESX will equip security professionals with the tools to grow their business in 2021 and beyond.  With changing social, economic, and business environments, security professionals need to adapt to new go-to-market strategies and offerings. Identifying the right next-gen products and services can have a positive impact on the customer pipeline, improve the customer experience and keep customers loyal. Cybersecurity During the session, “New Markets, Innovative Products, Bright Future” Parks Associates’ Amanda Kung and Alarm New England’s Alexandra Curtiss Thompson will share insights on how to build a marketing strategy that targets the unique needs of customers, evaluating current market segment penetration and top areas for growth. As the number of connected devices grows, so does the current threat landscape. Customers are looking to security professionals to ensure they are protected. During the session “Cyber Security: Current Landscape and Its Effects on the Security Industry,” Bosch Security’s David Brent will discuss major cyber threats that are most critical to the industry and how security professionals can protect their customers from them.  Insights into a growing business "These sessions will provide a glimpse at how security professionals are navigating today’s business environment and protecting their customers against evolving threats," said George De Marco, Chairman, ESX. "It is vital for ESX to provide a platform for security professionals to come together to exchange ideas and best practices. It’s how our industry gets stronger — by learning from one another.”

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