Electronic lock systems - Expert commentary

Why DIY Does Not Spell Doom For Professional Security Installers
Why DIY Does Not Spell Doom For Professional Security Installers

There’s no question that the popularity of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) security and home automation products is on the rise. The reasons for the growth in DIY sales are numerous, including increased awareness of home automation products, fast set-up, limited (if any) installation costs, and interoperability with other smart security products. In fact, with the parallel rise of smart home hubs like Alexa and Google Home, many people are opting to attempt the set-up of smart home devices without any professional assistance. According to a 2018 Residential Security Market Report prepared by Parks Associates and Security Sales & Integration magazine, “More than 60% of installing dealers now report that DIY systems are biting into demand for their services.” But the rise in DIY is not entirely bad news for security and home automation installers and dealers. There are a number of ways to view this glass as half-full. Let’s look at a few of them. Increase In Revenue For Dealers With their lower cost and perceived ease of installation, DIY products have broken down barriers for additional purchaseThere are reasons for dealers and installers to be cheerful about the rise of DIY. For one thing, according to that same Residential Security Market Report from Parks Associates, residential security dealers are doing quite well. The report states, “In 2017, revenues were up an average 7.72% for security dealers.” What about installations? The report goes on to say, “For 2017, the average number of installs per dealer was 22 per month, compared to 17 per month in 2016.” So, revenues are up for security dealers, and at least part of the reason can be attributed to the fact that DIY products can raise overall awareness of and spur interest in other home automation and security products. With their lower cost and perceived ease of installation, DIY products have actually broken down barriers for the additional purchase, and installation, of complete, professionally installed systems. Wireless, Connected Smart Locks For example, the sale of wireless, connected smart locks (viewed by some consumers as DIY) can lead to opportunities for further home automation product sales and professional installations. Connected smart locks can actually act as an extension of a smart hub or controller. They can be used to wirelessly communicate with and control all the devices that make up a home automation system, including lighting, entertainment, thermostats, air, alarms, shades and more. With their lower cost and perceived ease of installation, DIY products have actually broken down barriers for new security installations And they can do all this from a prime, convenient location – the front door, as well as other points of entry like the side or back doors. Plus, smart lock conversion kits like Kwikset Convert let homeowners easily bring home automation capabilities to their door without altering the aesthetics of the entry. Connected smart locks can allow homeowners to set up their home with custom scenarios, right before they step inside. For example, residents can program their lock so that every time they unlock the door, a foyer light goes on, temperatures begin to rise to a set level – even connected coffee makers can begin to make a cup. Portfolio Of Home Automation Products One of the best ways to mitigate the ‘threat’ of DIY sales is for dealers and installers to become more versatileSmart locks are just one example of the potential of DIY products to spark a homeowner’s interest in a wide range of other home automation devices, many of which would benefit from professional installation. One of the best ways to mitigate the ‘threat’ of DIY sales is for dealers and installers to become more versatile and offer a complete portfolio of home automation products. The larger the home automation offering, the more devices there are to sell and install, the larger the installation required, the greater the need for professional installation. Many homeowners who feel like they have a certain level of handiness will start by trying to do it themselves with a DIY product. But things don’t always go as planned, especially if they are attempting to set up a robust home automation system. First off, just because a product is DIY doesn’t mean that the old products that are being replaced are going to easily make way for the new. A DIY thermostat or smart lock might require that the old equipment (and possibly wires) get tugged out of the wall. Messy holes might need to be filled. Advantages Of Professional Installation Even after the old system has been removed, homeowners planning on setting up a connected system may soon realize they don’t have the electrical skills or technological know-how to install and connect all devices, get a system programmed correctly, and get everything up and running smoothly. Professional installers have learned from experience; there’s very little that they haven’t seen before. With their years of experience, installers know the best way to automate a home and how to create a custom smart home experience Do-it-yourselfers might be able to solve problems by searching the internet and finding videos. But, then again, they might not. After going the DIY route once, many full-home automation system enthusiasts are beginning to realize that the best way to get things done right the first time is to leave the installation and set-up to a professional. Professional installers can and should bring an extra level of experience and guidance to the process. Their services should go beyond tech installation and also include interface design. With their years of experience, installers know the best way to automate a home – how to create a custom smart home experience that doesn’t make the user feel less than smart. Selling Additional Home Automation Products If a problem arises due to installation error, the DIYer does not have any recourse to correct these mistakesResidential security dealers who offer professional installation should be willing to embrace the DIYer who has attempted to do a self-install but has not been able to complete the process successfully. With an open mind to this scenario, they can save the day for the DIYer, as well as create an opportunity to sell additional home automation equipment that the DIYer may not have known to be available.  The disparity between DIY and professional installation also brings to light the fact that there are no ‘satisfaction guarantees’ and no ‘installation/labor warranty’ available when a home automation system is installed by a DIYer. If a problem arises with either the equipment connectivity due to installation error, or if a piece of equipment is installed incorrectly, the DIYer does not have any recourse to correct these mistakes. This may not be as critical if a DIYer installs a minor piece of equipment, but with something as critical as securing and protecting their home with a home automation and security system, most people want full peace of mind that everything has been installed correctly. Reduces Connection Instability According to a 2017 study by the analyst firm, IHS Markit, “The quality of the equipment is usually higher in professionally installed systems, and professional configuration and setup greatly reduces the potential for connection instability…” This is an issue that DIYers may come to realize over time. On the other hand, one issue DIYers may recognize right away, especially if they are attempting to connect multiple devices, is that the connectivity may be inconsistent. Professionally installed devices operating on a wireless protocol might deliver better, consistent, longer-range connectivity IHS Markit explains that, “DIY systems rely on open protocols and Wi-Fi connectivity that can sometimes be unreliable, creating connection issues. Some of the sensors can become unrecognizable to the system, requiring intervention from the user. In contrast, professional wireless systems rely on UL- or EN-certified equipment to operate on the basis of proprietary frequency, enabling them to work with the control panel much more seamlessly.” In other words, professionally installed devices operating on a wireless protocol, even an open-source protocol like Z-Wave, might deliver better, consistent, longer-range connectivity, and fewer headaches. Not Everyone Is A DIY Customer There are customers who want someone to install the devices correctly and help them learn how to use and maintain themThere’s no doubt that there’s a segment of the security and home automation market that loves to spend their free time doing their own home improvement. They are watching videos, reading how-to books and manuals, and enjoying every minute. There’s also a segment of the market whose top goal is to save money up front. For these customers, there’s no getting around the joy of saving money with the lower cost of many DIY products. But there are also a great number of prospective customers out there for whom DIY is of absolutely no interest. These consumers do not want to be their own IT department. They want expert help: they want someone to install the devices correctly and help them learn how to use and maintain them. The IHS Markit study points out what many home automation dealers already know: that the elder and aging-in-place markets are an ideal destination for the security and convenience of home automation products. The study says, “Many senior citizens are not tech savvy enough to install a DIY system by themselves, so they tend to rely on professionally installed systems that are usually maintained by a family member.” Along with the senior citizens market, there are many other market segments out there that still desire worry-free professional installation. Installers should offer a range of products that includes some DIY products, and some leave-it-to-a-pro products Producing Complete And Custom Solutions Perhaps the best way for dealers and installers to stave off that feeling of doom that they might have about DIY is to tackle the problem head on and be creative. Offer a range of products that includes some DIY products, and some leave-it-to-a-pro products – consider the DIY product a great entry point for a more comprehensive system. Play up the peace of mind that comes with professional installations and support that pitch with flexible monitoring contracts and service plans. Share what you do and why; relay your passion for producing complete and custom solutions and communicate how you add value to any and every sale. No one, not even the most tech-savvy consumer, wants to install their own products if the end result is that the product doesn’t work the way it should. That’s where the pros can, should and will always come into play.

Choosing Your Security Entrance Installation In Line With Your Company Culture
Choosing Your Security Entrance Installation In Line With Your Company Culture

The extensive analysis and discussion preceding any decision to implement a new physical security solution – whether it’s hardware, software or a combination of both – often focuses on technology, ROI and effectiveness. When it comes to deciding what type of security entrances to install at your facility, you will almost certainly also consider the aesthetics of the product, along with throughput and, if you’re smart, you’ll also look into service concerns. Each of these factors has its important place within the evaluation process, and none should be overlooked as they all have a significant effect on how well your entrances will perform once they are installed. Culture Influences Door Solution Decisions How significant will the change from current entrances to security entrances be for employees? Still, one additional factor actually trumps everything: if you have not considered your organization’s culture in choosing a security entrance, you may be missing the most important piece of the puzzle. Culture is a part of every other decision factor when selecting an entry solution. Before you make a decision about what type of entrance to deploy, you need to consider and understand the values, environment and personality of your organization and personnel. For example, how significant will the change from current entrances to security entrances be for employees? If people are accustomed to simply walking through a standard swinging door with no access control, this will be a culture change. Beyond this, whether you are considering a type of turnstile, a security revolving door or possibly a mantrap portal, simply walking through it will be a significant change as well. Training Employees On Door Security You’ll want to know whether employees have ever used security entrances before. If these types of entrances are in place in another part of the facility, or in a facility they’ve worked in at an earlier time, the adjustment will not be as great as if they’ve never used them at all. Consider, too, how your personnel typically react to changes like this in the organization or at your facility. They may be quite adaptable, in which case there will be less work to do in advance to prepare them. However, the opposite may also be true, which will require you to take meaningful steps in order to achieve buy-in and train employees to properly use the new entrances.  With the increased importance of workplace security, discussing new entrances with  workforces will help maintain a safer environment Communicate Through The Decision-Making Process All of this will need to be communicated to your staff, of course. There are a number of ways to disseminate information without it appearing to come down as a dictate. Your personnel are a community, so news about changes should be shared rather than simply decreed. As part of this process, you’ll need to give some thought to the level of involvement you want for your staff in the decision-making process. Finally, do not overlook the special needs among your personnel population. You undoubtedly have older individuals on staff, as well as disabled persons and others who bring service animals to the office. Entrances need to be accessible to all, and you never want to be in the position of having a gap in accessibility pointed out to you by the individual who has been adversely affected. New Security Entrance Installation By communicating early and often with your personnel, you can alleviate a great deal of the anxiety Once you have made the decision about which security entrances to install, training your personnel on how to use the new security entrances – both before and after the installation – will help to smooth the transition. Because workplace security is such a big issue right now, it makes sense to discuss the new entrances in the context of helping to maintain a safer environment. They will prevent violent individuals from entering, decrease theft, and most of all, promote greater peace of mind during the workday. If you can help them take control of their own safety in a responsible way, you have achieved much more than just a compliant workforce. By communicating early and often with your personnel, you can alleviate a great deal of the anxiety and concern that surrounds a significant change in the work environment. Schedule Group Meetings Consider your employees; what type of communications do they respond best to? A few suggestions to educate staff on the benefits of the new entrances include: Typically, you would communicate a general message 2-3 months in advance and then provide more specific information (for example, impacts to fire egress, using certain entrances during construction) in a follow up message closer to the installation date. Schedule group meetings to: announce the rationale for increased security, share statistics on crime, review the new security changes that are coming, show drawings/photos of the new doors/turnstiles, and show the orientation videos available from the manufacturer. These meetings are an excellent way to work through user questions and directly address any concerns. Once the installation of a new security system is complete, it is a good idea to have an "ambassador" on board to help employees use these new systems Ensure You Monitor Public Areas If you are implementing a lot of new changes, such as a new access control system, new guard service and security entrances, you might consider hosting a ‘security fair’ on a given day and have the selected vendors come for a day with tabletop displays to meet employees and answer questions during their lunch. This could be a great way to break the ice in a large organization. Make user orientation videos (provided by the manufacturer) available in several ways, for example: Intranet Site Monitors in public areas—lounges, cafeteria, hallways, etc. Send to all staff as email attachments Immediately after installation, once the doors or turnstiles are operational but before they are put into service, train ‘ambassadors’ on how to use the door/turnstile. Have these people monitor and assist employees during peak traffic times. What Is The Ultimate Success Of The Installation? By communicating clearly and openly with your population you can greatly facilitate adoption and satisfaction If you have thousands of employees, consider dividing them into groups and introduce the new entrance to one group at a time (Group A on Monday, Group B on Tuesday, etc.) to allow a little extra orientation time. Place user education ‘quick steps’ posters next to the door/turnstiles for a few weeks to help employees remember the basic steps and guidelines, e.g., ‘stand in front of the turnstile, swipe badge, wait for green light, proceed.’ Ask your manufacturer to provide these or artwork. While there are always going to be people who are resistant to change, by communicating clearly and openly with your population you can greatly facilitate adoption and satisfaction. Your responsiveness to any issues and complaints that arise during and after the implementation is equally fundamental to the ultimate success of the installation.

Debunking The Myths Of The Security Of Access Control Systems
Debunking The Myths Of The Security Of Access Control Systems

It’s not surprising that people are nervous about the security of newer technologies, many of which are part of the Internet of Things (IoT). While they offer greater efficiency and connectivity, some people still hesitate. After all, there seems to be a constant stream of news stories about multinational corporations being breached or hackers taking control of smart home devices. Both of these scenarios can feel personal. No one likes the idea of their data falling into criminal hands. And we especially don’t like the thought that someone can, even virtually, come into our private spaces. The reality, though, is that, when you choose the right technology and undertake the proper procedures, IoT devices are incredibly secure. That said, one of the spaces where we see continued confusion is around access control systems (ACS) that are deployed over networks, particularly in relation to mobile access, smartcards, and electronic locks. These technologies are often perceived as being less secure and therefore more vulnerable to attacks than older ACS systems or devices. In the interest of clearing up any confusion, it is important to provide good, reliable information. With this in mind, there are some myths out there about the security of ACS that need to be debunked. The fact that these devices communicate with an ACS via Bluetooth or Near Field Communication (NFC) leads to one of the main myths we encounter Myth #1: Mobile Credentials Are Not Secure The first myth we have to look at exists around mobile credentials. Mobile credentials allow cardholders to access secured doors and areas with their mobile devices. The fact that these devices communicate with an ACS via Bluetooth or Near Field Communication (NFC) leads to one of the main myths we encounter about the security of credentialed information. There is a persistent belief that Bluetooth is not secure. In particular, people seem to be concerned that using mobile credentials makes your organization more vulnerable to skimming attacks. While focusing on the medium of communication is an important consideration when an organization deploys a mobile credentialing system, the concerns about Bluetooth miss the mark. Bluetooth and NFC are simply channels over which information is transmitted. Believing that Bluetooth is not secure would be the same as suggesting that the internet is not secure. In both cases, the security of your communication depends on the technology, protocols, and safeguards we all have in place. So, instead of wondering about Bluetooth or NFC, users should be focused on the security of the devices themselves. Before deploying mobile credentials, ask your vendor (1) how the credential is generated, stored, and secured on the device, (2) how the device communicates with the reader, and (3) how the reader securely accesses the credential information. When you deploy smartcard technology as part of your ACS, you should choose the latest generation, such as MiFARE DesFIRE EV1 or EV2 and HID iCLASS SEOS Myth #2: All Smartcards Are Equally Secure The question “how secure are my smartcards?” is a serious one. And the answer can depend on the generation of the cards themselves. For example, while older smartcards like MiFARE CLASSIC and HID iCLASS Classic offer better encryption than proxy cards and magstripe credentials, they have been compromised. Using these older technologies can make your organization vulnerable. As a result, when you deploy smartcard technology as part of your ACS, you should choose the latest generation, such as MiFARE DesFIRE EV1 or EV2 and HID iCLASS SEOS. In this way, you will be protecting your system as well as your buildings or facilities. Some traditional readers and controllers can also pose a serious risk to your organization if they use the Wiegand protocol, which offers no security. While you can upgrade to a more secure protocol like OSDP version 2, electronic locks are a very secure alternative worth considering. It is also important to understand that not all smartcard readers are compatible with all smartcard types. When they are not compatible, the built-in security designed to keep your system safe will not match up and you will essentially forego security as your smartcard-reader will not read the credentials at all. Instead, it will simply read the non-secure portion—the Card Serial Number (CSN) —of the smartcard that is accessible to everyone. While some manufacturers suggest that this is an advantage because their readers can work with any smartcard, the truth is that they are not reading from the secure part of the card, which can put your system and premises at risk. Using electronic locks can help protect facilities and networks through various security protocols, including encryption and authentication Myth #3: Electronic Locks Are More Vulnerable These days, there are still many who believe that electronic locks, especially wireless locks, are more vulnerable to cybercriminal activity as compared to traditional readers and controllers. The concern here is that electronic locks can allow cybercriminals to both access your network to get data and intercept commands from the gateway or nodes over the air that would allow them access to your buildings or facilities. The reality is that using electronic locks can help protect facilities and networks through various security protocols, including encryption and authentication. Additionally, because many of these locks remain operational regardless of network status, they provide real-time door monitoring. This means that many electronic locks not only prevent unauthorized access but also keep operators informed about their status at all times, even if a network goes down. Outdated technology and old analogue systems are more vulnerable to attacks When it comes to deploying electronic locks, it is important to remember that, like any device on your network, they must have built-in security features that will allow you to keep your information, people, and facilities safe. Be Prepared To Unlock Future Benefits Ultimately, the information in your IP-based ACS is at no greater risk than any other information being transmitted over the network. We just have to be smart about how we connect, transmit, and store our data. In the end, maintaining the status quo and refusing to move away from old technology is not a viable option. Outdated technology and old analogue systems are more vulnerable to attacks. The reason it is so important to debunk myths around ACS and, at the same time, get people thinking about network security in the right way is that network-based systems can offer an ever-increasing number of benefits. When we deploy new technology using industry best practices and purchase devices from trusted vendors, we put ourselves and our networks in the best possible position to take full advantage of all that our increasingly connected world has to offer.

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ASSA ABLOY Unveils The Latest In ‘Curb-To-Core’ Solutions At ISC West 2020
ASSA ABLOY Unveils The Latest In ‘Curb-To-Core’ Solutions At ISC West 2020

As SIA’s 2020 Member of the Year, ASSA ABLOY’s presence at ISC West 2020 will include an enhanced booth experience, showcasing a suite of new product innovations that help security professionals create access in smart and efficient ways. “Security professionals are experiencing rapid industry change, which is why ASSA ABLOY is focused on educating customers about the latest curb-to-core solutions,” said Mark Duato, Executive Vice President of Aftermarket Solutions at ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions America. “We intimately understand our customers’ challenges and have built a comprehensive suite of products and services that bring them smarter, simplified and intuitive solutions to help grow their businesses.” Providing Security and Access Control from Curb to Core ASSA ABLOY is a manufacturer that can provide doors, frames, mechanical and electronic access control to secure all of the openings in a myriad of facility types. Attendees will experience this broad range of solutions in a reimagined, user-friendly booth that highlights both individual products and complete, full-size door openings. Some of the latest innovations include: Building Envelope Adams Rite P8800 Pullman Rim Exit Device: This rim exit device is designed for narrow stile aluminum applications that require a life-safety exit device with a Pullman latching solution for use in retail storefronts, multi-use commercial offices, schools, medical centers and financial institutions. Norton 6300 Series Low Energy Operator: With a modular design and simple controls, this operator has a broad set of intelligent functions, such as power close, latch assist and obstruction detection to secure moderate to high traffic openings. Yale nexTouch Keypad Exit Trim: Ideal for commercial and multi-family environments, this exit trim provides the latest in keypad access with key-free convenience as an upgrade or retrofit solution. Interior Solutions Enhanced credential support across the Aperio family of wireless devices: Now offering support for mobile access via BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) or NFC, the Aperio wireless solution provides complete flexibility for your mobile access deployments. Securitron AQL Power Series: This customizable, intelligent power supply system provides improved functionality and efficiency through remote monitoring, with the ability to power a single electrified door opening or hundreds of access points. Status Indicators: The new status indicator option for Corbin Russwin ML2000 Series and SARGENT 8200 Series mortise locks features a 180° window design providing optimized visibility for the locked/unlocked door status, enhancing the privacy and emergency preparedness needs of any facility. RITE Slide: This acoustically-rated, soft close sliding door has a modern aesthetic design, ideal for medical rooms, patient rooms, offices and hospitality. Specialty Solutions Ultra-Light UL8 Bullet Resistant Door: Using an ultra-lightweight patented core, this door is over 50% lighter than conventional bullet-resistant doors. Real-World installation The full-size door display features complete solutions, typical of what you might find in vertical markets like government, education, healthcare, retail, multi-family, deco, glass and more. These doorways offer a unique opportunity to witness a ‘real-world’ installation and understand the complexities of their interactions. ASSA ABLOY is again hosting their annual USO Bag Build. Attendees can stop by the booth on March 19 from 1- 4 p.m. to pack supplies for military personnel leaving for or returning from deployment, awaiting the arrival of their personal luggage. ASSA ABLOY’s sister companies will also be onsite, including HID Global (booth# 11063), Alarm Controls (booth# 9077), Ameristar (booth# 9073), Abloy Security (booth# 7055) Traka (booth# 7041), August Home / Yale (booth# 32081), and LifeSafety Power (booth 14115).

Wireless Access Control Sees Major Growth In 2016
Wireless Access Control Sees Major Growth In 2016

The shift from wired to wireless access control was expected to gather pace in 2016—and that has happened. This year we at Assa Abloy surveyed a large cross-section of security professionals, seeking their insight into the changing market. Comparing our data with research we did in 2014 showed a clear trend towards wireless access control.   Wireless Access Data Our 2014 survey found 23% of commercial properties using a wireless or hybrid wired/wireless access control system. By 2016, that was 29%, with 5% of premises already fully wireless. We know we’re on the right track: ASSA ABLOY has invested heavily in market and product research, and we will continue. More card- and key-based wireless access control products are releasing through 2017 and beyond. We see a parallel trend in the residential market. Connected smart door locks, as part of smart homes, are becoming more high-profile, vindicating our investment in this sector. Our Yale brand has the largest range of smart door locks on the market.Efficient Security Solutions In 2016, more efficient security solutions have been right at the top of the agenda. Corporate and public sector budgets are tight, and that is likely to continue. On the commercial side, customers increasingly demand access control solutions that integrate with their current building management systems, even if those are made by different manufacturers. That’s why our Aperio wireless locks, cylinders, and escutcheons are built to open standards, for example. On the domestic side, connected living is taking off Connected Living Solutions Solutions must be easy to manage with low installation and maintenance costs, which is a major benefit of wireless access control. On the domestic side, connected living is taking off. More service providers in the domestic market—from energy suppliers to telecoms and security providers—are offering smart door locks as part of connected living solutions to their customers. Access Control In 2016 Looking ahead to 2017, interoperability and compatibility will be increasingly important in commercial access control, as customers expect multiple systems to integrate seamlessly. In smart-home technologies, too: Platforms like Samsung SmartThings, the UK’s O2 Home, innogy SmartHome in Germany and many others are critical to the growth of smart-home security. We also see a growing role for access control solutions in small and medium-sized businesses. Wireless access systems like our SMARTair or CLIQ Go product line make it more affordable and easier to install and run than ever. See the full coverage of 2016/2017 Review and Forecast articles here Save

IFSEC International 2016 Celebrates Huge Visitor Numbers
IFSEC International 2016 Celebrates Huge Visitor Numbers

IFSEC 2016 attracted 27,052 attendees, in line with the 2015 attendance IFSEC International 2016, organized by UBM EMEA, has announced another hugely successful year for Europe’s largest security event, hosted from the 21st – 23rd June at ExCeL London.Volume Of Visitors IFSEC once again delivered an exceptional industry experience, attracting 27,052 attendees, in line with the 2015 attendance. The event saw a huge day one and two at IFSEC, with exhibitors overwhelmed with the sheer volume of quality visitors. Battling nature and politics on the third day, with the UK’s EU Referendum and severe flooding in London, the South West and Essex severing transport links to the venue, IFSEC still managed to deliver over 7,000 visitors to exhibitor stands on day three alone.Key audiences on the IFSEC show floor saw growth this year, with an increase of the installer and integrator professions by 7% and significant international visitor participation at 34%, cementing IFSEC as the industry’s chosen global security exhibition. IFSEC also grew this year through crossovers from the co-located events, FIREX, Facilities Show, Safety & Health Expo, Service Management Expo and Professional Clothing Show, with a higher interest in security this year leading to an increase of show-floor visits.Gerry Dunphy, Event Director for IFSEC & FIREX International, said: "IFSEC 2016 was another seismic experience for all concerned, a fantastic display of the very best in world class security products and solutions. The new areas this year such as Home Automation successfully showcased a whole new range of technologies available to security professionals and the Drone Zone was an absolute floor filler proving that IFSEC can always provide exciting spectacles for the visiting audience. We have already planned the main themes for 2017, so the security world should look out for further developments in home automation, smart commercial buildings, Borders & Infrastructure for senior specifiers of strategic security management and Installer World - a definitive destination for engineers and installers." "IFSEC 2016 was another seismic experience for all concerned, a fantastic display of the very best in world class security" IFSEC International was very pleased to again welcome BSIA (British Security Industry Association) as a supporter of the event. James Kelly (Chief Executive), speaking on the event, stated “BSIA is proud to promote the importance of quality as a key consideration within the security industry. IFSEC provides both security buyers and industry colleagues with access to education and thought leadership.”With security technology at the heart of the IFSEC community, this year saw the audience of more than 27,000 security buyers with over 20,000 different security solutions on offer at this year’s event. Key to the product offering were new launches across video surveillance, cyber, access control and integrated solutions, with new products revealed from Suprema, Canon, Avigilon and IDIS to name a few.New Areas Of Interest For the first time a complete home environment was created within IFSEC in the form of a purpose-built, smart house, sponsored by Yale. This setting, delivered by the Control4 platform, demonstrated the very latest tech for fully automating the home for safety and security measures. There were examples on show from Merit Lilin, Nest, Invixium, 2N Communications and many others, all of which integrated with Control4’s network to demonstrate the fully automated functionality of Home Automation. With an enhanced focus on this year’s Physical & Perimeter Protection area, IFSEC saw a growth to 22% of the audience attending to view products across perimeter protection, locking systems, safes and more. With increased security threats from terrorism, the need to protect businesses from external threats has never been greater, therefore this year’s success will develop into a fuller offering on the show floor as the event moves into 2017, with a new launch, IFSEC Borders & Infrastructure.A further launch for 2016, the ARC Village, comprised of 13 exhibiting ARCs to meet the visiting installer needs. Within this first year, the attendance surpassed expectations, with over 2000 installers and integrators attending this area, designed to showcase the best in Alarm Receiving Centres, hosted in partnership with connectivity partner, CSL Dualcom. The new Drone Zone created a buzz throughout the ExCeL as people visited to see how the security world can benefit from this innovative new offering The new Drone Zone created a buzz throughout the ExCeL as people visited to see how the security world can benefit from this innovative new offering, with demonstrations expertly piloted to showcase the opportunities of this new technology to the crowds. With new legislation still being drafted and research indicating the drone market will be worth $80 billion by 2025, this new tech area showcased a unique and exciting alternative to the security industry in the future.Inspirational Speaker SeriesThe Inspirational Speaker Series continued to attract large crowds this year from across the security, safety, fire, facilities management and service management industries to the 400 capacity theater each day. Speakers were again of a very high calibre with Colonel Tim Collins OBE, Kate Adie OBE and James Cracknell OBE, sharing key insights on how they have overcome adversity and challenges in their extraordinary careers in order to achieve their goals, from everyday tasks of getting children to school before work, to overcoming traumatic events to ensure a continual strive for progress. A further hugely successful security-centric seminar program saw over 11,000 security professionals attend sessions from tactical training through to security leadership techniques, including the popular Tavcom Training Theatre.IFSEC also continued to benefit from the co-located fire, facilities, security, service management and workwear and uniform events, which as a total saw over 45,000 visitors at the ExCeL over the three days, a 4% increase on 2015. Across the series, visitors were able to benefit from meeting their needs for fleet management, fire integration, health & safety legislation, uniforms and more.IFSEC International 2017 takes place from 20th – 22nd June at ExCeL London.

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