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Entrance Control Vs Access Control: Similarities And Differences
Entrance Control Vs Access Control: Similarities And Differences

Entrance control and access control - of the physical kind - are common terms in the security industry which are often used interchangeably, but should they be? Having worked both sides of the fence, with previous roles at TDSi and HID and now the Major Accounts and Marketing Manager at Integrated Design Limited, Tony Smith highlights the subtle but important differences between these two terms and the systems they refer to, outlining how they should work together to achieve optimal security. Access control is a system which provides discriminating authentication Access control provides a discriminating authentication process and comprises the software or hardware that defines the criteria for acceptance or denial Used to describe a system which performs identification of users and authentication of their credentials (deciding whether or not the bearer of those credentials is permitted admission) access control is an incredibly broad term. Access control provides a discriminating authentication process and comprises the software or hardware that defines the criteria for acceptance or denial of an individual to a restricted area. Entrance control – such as security turnstiles - takes the output of that validation and has the capability to see whether that criteria is being adhered to, either granting or denying access as appropriate. Entrance control is the hardware responsible for keeping people honest If access control verifies authorized personnel using their credentials – their face, fingerprints, PIN number, fob, key card etc – and decides whether or not they are permitted access, entrance control is the hardware which enforces that decision by making users present their credentials in the correct way, either opening to allow pedestrian access or remaining closed to bar entry and potentially raising an alarm. For example, a card reader acts as an access control device, recognizing the card holder as having the correct permissions and saying ‘yes, this person can pass’. But, it’s the entrance control system – a turnstile, for example – which actually physically allows or denies access. Physical access and video surveillance Some entrance control systems don’t feature a physical barrier, however. Fastlane Optical turnstiles will not physically stop an unauthorized person from passing through, and instead alarm when someone fails to present valid credentials, alerting security staff that a breach has occurred. These kinds of turnstiles are suited to environments which just need to delineate between the public and secure side of an entrance, with less need to physically prevent unauthorized users from entering. State of the art access control integrations have been installed for award-winning complex, The Bower It’s also possible to capture video footage of any incidents, allowing security personnel to identify users failing to abide by the access control system’s rules, using It’s also possible to capture video footage of incidents, allowing security personnel to identify users failing to abide by access control system rules the footage to decide on the level of response required. The breach could have been the result of a member of staff being in a hurry and failing to show their card before passing through, in which case they can be reminded about the security protocol. Or, it could be an unidentified person who needs to be escorted from the premises. Entrance control and access control working together For optimum security, access control and entrance control should work together, with the entrance control system enhancing the use of the access control system, making it more efficient and better value for money. The two can’t effectively operate without each other. Security turnstiles, for example, require something to tell them that someone is about to enter – the access control system does this – and, the access control system needs a method of stopping people when they don’t badge in correctly. The two systems are complementary.

Making The Shift From Manufacturer To Service Provider
Making The Shift From Manufacturer To Service Provider

The jury is in: traditional security is out — and it’s being replaced with service-based solutions. The bottom line is: if you’re not embracing it, you’ll soon be left behind. XaaS — the collective term referring to the delivery of anything as a service — includes all services made possible through the use of the cloud. Security-as-a-Service (SaaS), which encompasses any type of system from access control to video surveillance, has paved the way for users to gain significant functionality and scalability not previously experienced with more traditional methods. Complicated IT functions SaaS allows manufacturers to provide numerous benefits to their customers As such, there is a marked transition for manufacturers from simply designing and building products to providing a service rooted in a partner- and customer-centric focus. This change hasn’t come easily. Some are still holding out and waiting for the “fad” to pass. However, the potential advantages for all parties involved far outweigh the perceived negative points. First and foremost, SaaS allows manufacturers to provide numerous benefits to their customers. An “as-a-service” model shifts the burden of data maintenance and infrastructure spending to an integrator/dealer partner or service provider. This relieves the end user of the expertise necessary to implement complicated IT functions to keep networked and on-premise solutions up-to-date. Traditional security systems Additionally, end users demand solid customer service. For some end users, traditional security systems are so similar in features and functionality that the key differentiator is the ability of the integrator or manufacturer to provide exceptional customer service and training. This is made possible through the service-based model, where customers appreciate a strong relationship with their integrator or manufacturer that provides them with additional knowledge and assistance when necessary. The cloud has proven to be  highly functional, flexible, and convenient for organizations Everyone also wants convenience. In the consumer market, we invest in things like meals that are pre-measured, prepped, and ready to be cooked, or companies that auto-ship dog food to our door each month. This ease-of-use translates over to the B2B market, where time is money and systems that save valuable resources are highly regarded. The Role of the Cloud The cloud has proven to be a highly functional, flexible, and convenient method for organizations to leverage as part of their strategies to protect and modernize their facilities. And the service-based nature lends itself well; forward-thinking integrators and dealers can diversify their product arsenal while still capitalizing on a recurring monthly revenue model (RMR). But then why has there been so much resistance to this change? Over the last 10 to 15 years, the cloud has gotten a bad rap for a myriad of reasons, including usability, management, and unreliability. However, that view of the cloud is changing for the positive as the technology becomes more advanced and innovators learn more about what it means to design a product or service with security at its core. "As-a-service” platform For example, one of the biggest misconceptions that plagues the cloud is the idea that it is not secure. However, the security of public cloud service providers is integral to their success because their business depends on it. Developing an ongoing and trustworthy relationship with customers can only be made possible through the assurance that their services are safe and the customer’s data is protected. As such, they’ve embraced the service-based model that is, at its core, the future of the business world as we know it. There isn’t a person, manufacturer, or integrator partner out there today who isn’t somehow touched or influenced by an “as-a-service” platform. And it’s about time the service-based model that leverages the public cloud reaches the masses.

A Secured Entrance Is The First Defense Against An Active Shooter
A Secured Entrance Is The First Defense Against An Active Shooter

The statistics are staggering. The death tolls are rising. And those who now fear environments that were once thought to be safe zones like school campuses, factories, commercial businesses and government facilities, find themselves having to add the routine of active-shooter drills into their traditional fire drill protocols. The latest active shooter statistics released by the FBI earlier this year in their annual active-shooter report designated 27 events as active shooter incidents in 2018. The report reveals that 16 of the 27 incidents occurred in areas of commerce, seven incidents occurred in business environments, and five incidents occurred in education environments. Deadly active-shooter events Six of the 12 deadliest shootings in the country have taken place in the past five years Six of the 12 deadliest shootings in the country have taken place in the past five years, including Sutherland Springs church, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the San Bernardino regional center, the Walmart in El Paso and the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, which have all occurred since 2015. Although these incidents occurred in facilities with designated entry points common to churches, schools and businesses, the two most deadly active-shooter events since 2015 were the Route 91 Harvest music festival shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 dead and the Pulse nightclub killings in Orlando where 49 perished. As Christopher Combs, special agent in charge of the FBI field office in San Antonio, Texas, said during a news conference following the August 31 mass shooting in Odessa, Texas that claimed seven lives: “We are now at almost every two weeks seeing an active shooter in this country." Active shooter incidents Between December 2000 and December 2018, the FBI’s distribution of active shooter incidents by location looks like this: Businesses Open to Pedestrian Traffic (74) Businesses Closed to Pedestrian Traffic (43) K-12 Schools (39) Institutions of Higher Learning (16) Non-Military Government Properties (28) Military Properties—Restricted (5) Healthcare Facilities (11) Houses of Worship (10) Private Properties (12) Malls (6) What the majority of these venues have in common is they all have a front entrance or chokepoint for anyone entering the facilities, which is why any active-shooter plan must include a strategy to secure that entry point. Situational awareness in perimeter and door security Preventing people with the wrong intentions from entering the space is the goal" According to Paul Franco, an A&E with more than 28 years of experience as a consultant and systems integrator focusing on schools, healthcare and large public and private facilities, that while active shooter incidents continue to rise, the residual effect has been an increase in situational awareness in perimeter and door security. “Certainly, protecting people and assets is the number one goal of all our clients. There are multiple considerations in facilities like K-12 and Healthcare. Preventing people with the wrong intentions from entering the space is the goal. But a critical consideration to emphasize to your client is getting that person out of your facility and not creating a more dangerous situation by locking the person in your facility,” says Franco. High-security turnstiles “Schools today are creating a space for vetting visitors prior to allowing access into the main facility. Using technology properly like high-security turnstiles offer great benefits in existing schools where space constraints and renovation costs can be impractical.” What steps should they be taken when recommending the proper door security to ensure the building is safe As a consultant/integrator, when discussions are had with a client that has a facility in a public space like a corporate building, government center or industrial facility, what steps should they be taken when recommending the proper door security to ensure the building is safe and can protect its people and assets? For Frank Pisciotta, President and CEO of Business Protection Specialists, Inc. in Raleigh, North Carolina, a fundamental element of his security strategy is making appropriate recommendations that are broad-based and proactive. Properly identifying the adversaries “As a consultant, my recommendations must include properly identifying the adversaries who may show up at a client’s door, the likelihood of that event occurring, the consequences of that event occurring, determining if there are tripwires that can be set so an organization can move their line of defense away from the door, educating employees to report potential threats and creating real-time actionable plans to respond to threats. A more reactionary posture might include such thing as target hardening such as ballistic resistant materials at entry access points to a facility,” Pisciotta says. Veteran consultant David Aggleton of Aggleton & Associates of Mission Viejo, California recommends that clients compartmentalize their higher security areas for limited access by adding multiple credential controls (card + keypad + biometric), along with ‘positive’ access systems that inhibit tailgating/piggybacking such as secure turnstiles, revolving door and mantrap if your entrances and security needs meet the required space and access throughput rates. Integrated solution of electronic access control Defining a single point of entry in some public facilities is becoming the new standard of care according to many A&Es and security consultants, especially in a school environment. This approach allows a concerted effort when it comes to staffing, visitor monitoring and an integrated technology solution. The bottom line remains: most buildings are vulnerable to a security breach A proactive stance to securing a door entryway will use an integrated solution of electronic access control, turnstiles, revolving doors and mantraps that can substantially improve a facility’s security profile. The bottom line remains: most buildings are vulnerable to a security breach, so it’s not a matter of if there will be a next active shooter tragedy, it’s only a matter of where. Enhancing access control assurance “There is no easy answer to this question,” says Pisciotta referring to how a secured entrance can deter an active shooter. “There have been at least two high-profile incidents of adversaries shooting their way into a facility through access control barriers. So, if the threat so dictates, a ballistic resistant might be required.” He concludes: “There is obviously no question that turnstiles, revolving doors and man traps enhance access control assurance. Electronic access control is easy to integrate with these devices and providing that credentials are secure, approval processes are in place, change management is properly managed and the appropriate auditing measures in place, access control objectives can be met.”

Latest Bioscrypt Inc. news

Morpho Displays Biometric Access Control And Time Solutions At ASIS International 2015
Morpho Displays Biometric Access Control And Time Solutions At ASIS International 2015

MA SIGMA Lite fingerprint terminals are specifically designed to equip narrow mounting surfaces  Morpho (Safran) announced recently the introduction of two new additions to the popular MorphoAccess® (MA) SIGMA family of biometric access control and time solutions, called the MorphoAccess® SIGMA Lite series. The new devices will be on display at ASIS 2015 in Anaheim, from September 28 to October 1, 2015. Engineered with the same attention to detail and performance as the versatile MA SIGMA biometric access terminal, the MA SIGMA Lite fingerprint terminals are specifically designed to equip narrow mounting surfaces on glass/aluminum door mullions, turnstiles, or server rack doors. With two designs and multiple card reader options, there are a variety of models to address the widest range of deployment scenarios, both indoors and outdoors. The first design features an LED indicator to assist users in the access control process, whereas the second model offers enhanced interactivity with a color touchscreen. Morpho's Fingerprint Technology With Morpho's industry leading fingerprint technology inside, they are equipped for a high capacity workload, accommodating up to 250,000 users for one-to-one verification and up to 10,000 users for one-to-many identification. The slim and sleek fingerprint readers embed a web server that enables users of laptops, tablets or smartphones to connect, and then trigger on-device enrollment, configure terminals or retrieve transaction logs. Offering an easy to use mounting system and high configurability, the devices fit perfectly into legacy Bioscrypt and Morpho installations as well as new implementations. "With these new devices, the right combination of design, robustness and performance is now available in a compact package," said Samuel Fringant, Executive Vice President of Morpho's Security division. "By delivering readers suitable for renewing legacy installations, complementing deployments of MA SIGMA stations or securing brand new facilities, Morpho reaffirms its commitment to give its customers access to the latest refinements of its technology, whatever the situation."

Open Options To Feature Successful Integration Partners And Products At ISC West 2014
Open Options To Feature Successful Integration Partners And Products At ISC West 2014

Open Options will also showcase its latest release, DNA Fusion Version 6, at ISC West Open Options, an industry leader in open platform access control solutions, will showcase the latest release of DNA Fusion – Version 6 – and will highlight integration partners at ISC West Las Vegas, the largest physical security trade show in North America. “Having just released DNA Fusion V6 ahead of schedule in February, Open Options is excited to provide the thousands of security professionals who visit ISC West the most up-to-date and advanced version of our flagship access control software,” said Open Options CEO Steve Fisher. “We are also eager to highlight our valued technology partners who have worked so diligently with us to provide total access control and security solutions.” Considered the security industry’s premier launching pad for new products and technologies, ISC West hosts more than 26,000 global security product manufacturers and professionals each spring in Las Vegas. This year the event will be held at the Las Vegas Sands Expo, April 2-4. ISC West attendees are invited to visit Open Options Booth 6103 to experience the latest in access control software – Open Options’ DNA Fusion V6 – on its various platforms including the new Fusion Web and Fusion Mobile applications. New features and enhancements to DNA Fusion V6 include: Flex API (Application Programming Interface) – Provides a robust mechanism for external parties to develop an interface into DNA Fusion to accomplish a myriad of tasks or receive information. Fusion Mobile – Manage access control security “on-the-go” from Apple and Android smartphones. Fusion Web – Manage access control security from the web (supports most browsers). New Biometric Integrations – Full support for Schlage Handkey II geometry reader and direct interface for the new Bioscrypt 4G Series readers. Wireless Intelligent Lock Interfaces – With ASSA ABLOY WiFi and PoE locks, ASSA ABLOY Aperio, Salto Wireless locks, and provides extended features for Schalge AD Series Wireless locks. New Video Integrations – Aimetis, Video Next, Video Insight Open Options will feature successful integration partners and products at ISC West, including an exciting new product from Zwipe – the first contactless card with full on-card fingerprint scanning and matching functionality. Other partner highlights will include Allegion AD-Series lock interface, ASSA ABLOY Wifi lock interface, aptiQ Mobile NFC credentials, HID cards and readers, and Salto Systems.

World’s Largest Casino Selects 3D Facial Recognition
World’s Largest Casino Selects 3D Facial Recognition

Because of the speed at which the 3D face readers authenticate employees even at peak hours, The Venetian Macao, the world's largest casino, has deployed 13 VisionAccess 3D Face Readers in order to authenticate 12,000 employees at the front entrance when a new shift starts.Bioscrypt's 3D face reader is a hands-free biometric solution that authenticates users in under a second by matching the structure of the person's face against their enrolled template.  The VisionAccess readers function by shining an invisible near infrared light grid pattern on a user's face.  A camera then takes a picture of the resulting distortions in the grid pattern and makes a match against a template.  Turnstiles ensure that only one employee enters at a time, eliminating tailgating.  Solution Expert Technology, the system integrator for the face recognition and access control system for the Venetian Macao employee's entrance, developed access control software for both Chinese and English users that interfaces seamlessly with the face readers.The casino has avoided illegal and unauthorized workers by using the face reader.  The two-way turnstiles allow the same turnstile to be used by workers both entering and exiting a casino site.  A contactless smart card, typically kept in a hip pocket, calls up a stored biometric template, which is then immediately validated as users pause in front of the reader.  Timekeeping information for the employee is instantly transmitted to a central office.  Everyone entering their back office, from employees to outside vendors, is required to use the face readers for access. The size of The Venetian deployment demonstrates that 3D facial recognition has the ability to scale up and accommodate a large number of users without creating bottlenecks.  The Venetian Macao is the largest building in Asia and the second largest in the world.  It has a stadium that seats 15,000, 350 retail shops and 3,000 rooms.  This complete range is available from Premier Electronics Ltd.