VIDEOR Creates Customised Solutions
VIDEOR Creates Customised Solutions

The Value Added Multibrand Distributor VIDEOR responds to customer requests by combining thermal imaging cameras made by the US manufacturer FLIR with its eneo brand pan/tilt systems into a single system offered at an unbeatable price. Thermal imaging cameras from the FLIR SR Series are fitted with pan/tilt heads from the VPT Series and fully cabled in VIDEOR's own production facility. Plug & Play then provides easy connection and immediate start-up. PC management software does not have to be purchased separately as it is bundled in the product package.Ideal for analog as well as IP solutions, this product-combination team achieves excellent results in all harsh environments. The FLIR thermal imaging cameras are available with focal lengths of 19, 35, 50 or 100 millimetres and - as opposed to other night vision systems the FLIR SR Series does not need any residual light - they deliver crisp thermal images with a resolution of 320 x 240 pixels even in full darkness. Their special image processing technology ensures the cameras deliver excellent contrast regardless of the scene dynamics.The eneo pan/tilt heads reach a homing speed of 100° per second (horizontal) and come with an automatic tilt function, optional fan heater and offer up to 64 pre-selected positions. Furthermore, eneo supplies extensive accessories for further expansion such as the KBD-NSC-100 Network System Controller, connection boxes or network encoders.With this combination of two products, VIDEOR is providing system integrators and installers a less complex and more economical alternative to comparable systems. Both brands simultaneously stand for high product quality and reliability. By the way: the full range of FLIR thermal imaging products has also been available from VIDEOR in the UK since September.

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Pan tilts - Expert commentary

Overcoming Challenges And Mapping The Future Of Video Surveillance
Overcoming Challenges And Mapping The Future Of Video Surveillance

Over the last year, we have continued to see the rise of manufacturers from China in the mid- to low-end market for video surveillance - a trend that currently shows no signs of tapering. Additionally, the shift from analog to IP systems has remained consistent, with end users increasingly looking to network-enabled devices to mitigate risk from both a physical and cyber perspective. Complex network attacks in 2016 demonstrated the need for increased network security for network-connected devices such as IP cameras and network video recorders. More and more manufacturers are considering the potential for such attacks when designing updates for existing hardware and software technology, strengthening password requirements, incorporating robust data encryption, and educating integrators and end users on how to put protocols in place to protect the valuable information being collected. Increased Security Collaborations Today’s surveillance technology - and the new innovations right around the corner - incorporates more IT protocols in response to high-profile cyber incidents. As a result, IT standards will finally start being adopted by security system manufacturers over the course of the next few years. At the same time, we'll see increased collaboration between IT and security leaders within enterprises. Intelligent, Big Data Analysis Video technologies such as panoramic 360-degree cameras with advanced dewarping capabilities are being rapidly adopted, along with video analytics software that enables the extraction of data for business intelligence, apart from just security video. The future includes more widespread availability of cloud technologies and services. In 2017, we can look forward to the more widespread adoption of intelligent analytics and big data analysis, which has the potential to streamline processes and optimize sales operations for organizations to drive new levels of business intelligence. See the full coverage of 2016/2017 Review and Forecast articles here Save

Getting Crisis Management And Emergency Planning Requirements Right
Getting Crisis Management And Emergency Planning Requirements Right

Think of crisis management and emergency planning as a  customer service Do you have a written emergency management plan? Where is it? When was the last time you updated it? Developing and writing a corporate or organizational emergency management plan can take a long time. Once completed, however, the plan is there for you to access when you need it. In fact, that’s wrong. According to crisis management authority Michael J. Fagel, emergency planning is supposed to take forever, and it should never go onto a shelf where no one might ever look at it again. “Emergency planning for crisis management is never finished,” Fagel said. “Security is a process, a continuing task that you modify and refine to meet changing circumstances, while continuing to work on improving the overall system.” Fagel has spent nearly four decades in fire, rescue, emergency medical services, law enforcement, public health emergency management and corporate safety and security. His experience includes responding to crises and disasters including the Oklahoma City Bombing and the World Trade Center in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. He also led a team of experts that authored the 2013 book “Crisis Management and Emergency Planning: Preparing for Today’s Challenges,” which was published by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group. For Fagel, the security process moves forward through clear communications. “Emergency planning is a culture with a communications methodology, where people in a hierarchical structure or chain of command work together to make things work.  “By communications, I don’t mean radios, email and texting. I mean talking face-to-face and person-to-person. Think of crisis management and emergency planning as customer service. You, as my customer, make me understand what you need, and I provide it.” But It Won’t Happen Here The worst probably won’t happen, but something will undoubtedly happen. Maybe it won’t be 9/11, but there will be a crisis. So you need a plan, one that evolves and keeps pace with your organization’s risks and vulnerabilities. And you need your plan now. “Crisis management begins before the crisis,” said Fagel. “You can’t pass out your crisis manager business cards as the police arrive in response to an active shooter or bomb threat at your facility. According to crisis management authority Michael J. Fagel, emergency planning is supposed to take forever “You need to form relationships with first responders far ahead of time. You as the crisis manager must sit with the head of security and the building or campus manager and talk about and develop the plan.” Then you have to practice or drill the plan, continued Fagel. As your town’s crisis manager, what will you do if you lose the only hospital you have in your small town? Figure out what that means: It means that your response time to medical emergencies has grown from minutes to unacceptably high, because your town’s two ambulances must deliver patients to the hospital in the next town, which is 40 miles away. You should have talked to the EMTs and asked them what equipment they would want if you had to put together a couple of temporary ambulances. You would also have to find vehicles. Would the police lend you two vans? Do you live in a tornado alley? What happens if a tornado tears into your town’s middle school? Do the schools have a plan? You should probably talk to them about linking their plans with yours. “Crisis management and emergency planning require discussions, information, problem solving and facilitation ahead of time on a continuing basis,” says Fagel. “What are the risks and vulnerabilities? How can you mitigate risks and vulnerabilities? A crisis manager thinks and communicates about these issues daily, imagining what might happen and how to respond.” Currently, Fagel teaches courses in homeland security, terrorism, biodefense and other crisis management and emergency planning subjects at the Illinois Institute of Technology-Stuart School of Business, Masters in Public Affairs Program. He teaches similar courses at Northwestern University in the Masters of Public Policy and Administration Program. He also teaches courses in masters programs at Northern Illinois University, Benedictine University and Eastern Kentucky University.

IP Network Requirements For Video Surveillance/physical Security
IP Network Requirements For Video Surveillance/physical Security

IT networks are expanding to include more users and applications The use of corporate IT network infrastructure for physical security applications such as video surveillance presents unique challenges. Jack Fernandes, President & CEO of American Fibertek, makes a case for separate networks using specialized equipment and technologies specifically designed for video surveillance which could also integrate other physical security functions. In today’s business world, corporate IT networks are not only expanding to meet accelerating demand, but also to include more users and applications. As businesses use information technology (IT) to collect data from every corner of their business, the term “LAN sprawl” has been suggested to describe the multi-dimensional growth that is putting new stresses on the corporate network. One of the issues that comes with the expansion of local area networks (LANs) is how to control the network infrastructure, especially in relation to allowing users to access data.Given the transition of the physical security industry to systems based on Internet protocol (IP), often that data traveling along the enterprise LAN is related to physical security, including video surveillance. Video data can challenge networks both because it uses a lot of bandwidth and because the user has a high expectation of real-time video without latency. As growing networks accommodate the demands of more users and applications, it has become increasingly difficult for a video surveillance or security system to operate effectively. Many companies are concluding that the best approach is a separate IT infrastructure that is dedicated to video and other security systems.As the amount of network information flowing at any given time can lead to recording and viewing problems, video security systems should have their own network rather than running on a shared database. This approach can also take advantage of IT networking innovations designed specifically for the video and physical security marketplace. Advantages of a separate IP Network  for surveillance videoTraffic on a video-specific network does not have to compete with other network data or deal with video quality issues. Dedicating a separate network to video applications enables the system to be designed especially for that purpose, including use of technologies to maximize functionality and dependability. Traffic on a video-specific network does not have to compete with other network data Performance-maximizing technologies for video networks include devices to monitor the efficient operation of the network. Such devices take into account variables such as power, environmental conditions and bandwidth usage. Network technologies designed for security/video systems can also facilitate integration of a range of security-related functionality.The Unique Needs Of Physical SecurityPhysical security information systems, including video, are critical to a company's security operation and general well-being. The security mission requires fail-safe systems that operate dependably over long periods of time, as well as those that are ready to respond when needed. Security systems also must be scalable, flexible and able to adapt to a company's changing protection needs, and should not have to compete for network resources with the growing number of other applications and users on the enterprise network.Video’s bandwidth and system needs are too extensive for it to be relegated as part of an already overburdened corporate network infrastructure. Security has historically operated separately from other corporate functions, an arrangement that supports its distinctly focused mission and enables information systems for video and security applications to operate effectively and mostly independent of other corporate operations. The security market has unique needs. Not all IT is suitable or appropriate for IP video surveillance. It takes specialized equipment to meet the specific needs of the video and security market.

Latest eneo news

Eneo Complete Systems Are Being Used In Over Sixty Müller Health And Beauty Retailers
Eneo Complete Systems Are Being Used In Over Sixty Müller Health And Beauty Retailers

Müller is one of Europe’s leading health and beauty retail companies. Nearly 24,000 employees work in over 600 locations all over the continent. And Müller continues to grow: an average of 50 new stores are opened each year with a product range which includes CDs, toys and stationery and really sets itself apart from the competition – at prices which Müller invites you to check against competitors’ prices, in accordance with their slogan: “You should compare our prices.” Müller ensures that prices will remain just as low in the future by using eneo video surveillance which has been installed in over sixty Müller stores so far. Inventory discrepancies are a growing problem in retail and can lead to rising prices if they are not prevented effectively. Thus protecting honest customers is essential. At Müller, the installation of the systems is always in accordance with strict data protection regulations which are fulfilled meticulously by the responsible installation company. Why did Müller choose eneo? “Based on the recommendation of our installation company, we carried out a three-week test in one location, and it was very successful,” explains Mario Messner, Managing Director at the security agency Müller Sicherheitsdienst Ulm MSDU. “Due to the high image quality, a lower recording rate was sufficient compared to another recorder model which we had in operation at the same time with 25 pictures per second. Because we wanted to keep the memory requirements as low as possible, it didn’t take us long to make a decision. We were also impressed by the price-performance ratio, which is significant when numerous cameras are being installed in each store.” Mario Messner has never regretted this decision, quite the contrary. “We now have numerous cameras, domes and recorders from eneo in operation in over sixty stores. The number is in the hundreds. The failure rate is so minimal that it is negligible. The equipment is absolutely reliable.”

Security With 360° Video Surveillance: Use Of The Eneo Almira Camera In The Jewish Museum, Frankfurt, Germany
Security With 360° Video Surveillance: Use Of The Eneo Almira Camera In The Jewish Museum, Frankfurt, Germany

The Jewish Museum in Frankfurt is one of the three major Jewish museums in Germany.  It traces the interrelationship between Jews in Germany and their environment based on the example of Frankfurt.  Prior to World War II the city of Frankfurt had the highest percentage of Jewish inhabitants with over 26,000 Jewish citizens.  The building is secured today by 360° video surveillance.  Its open character was intentionally selected, as the changing exhibitions are to be accessible to all interested visitors.  However the museum, which is housed in two classical mansions, is one of the sites generally at risk as is the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin.  A balancing act that requires exceptional understanding from decision makers when it comes to security precautions. Blind angles caused by concrete columns in the foyerThe solid reinforced concrete construction of the building complex renovated in the 1980s in particular cannot always be regarded as being advantageous.  Several concrete columns in the entrance area obstruct viewing and proved to be restrictive for installation of a video surveillance system suitable for identification of persons. Thomas Sittig, Technical Director of the Museum and responsible for security said, "In addition to appropriate checks of baggage and persons we have been using video surveillance since the opening.  However, we encountered some difficulties in extending the existing system in the sensitive entrance area - on the one hand some areas of the foyer are difficult to view, and on the other hand the cable routing was made difficult because of the reinforced concrete and it is not possible to put it under plaster."Perfect solution replaces several cameras In the planning phase Peter Kleist, the Project Manager of Heer GmbH from Frankfurt, therefore proposed a solution with 360° video surveillance.  He said, "The floor plan would have made at least five or six conventional surveillance cameras necessary to cover all the angles.  But when we then considered the Almira System with its four virtual cameras, it immediately awakened great interest!″  The special lens of this ultra wide-angle camera not only delivers a 360° image field; with the ‘Almira C-1202', up to four virtual cameras can be displayed and controlled with full Pan/Tilt/Zoom functionality.  The system is installed at a three-metre height so it can be seen and it has the whole foyer in view.  Plus, its high-resolution 3-megapixel CMOS sensor delivers brilliant quality pictures to the full satisfaction of viewers when they view the 42" plasma monitor in the control centre. Three megapixels for clear and sharp picturesThe Security Officer can now choose between 2 x 180° panorama, 4 x 90° panorama or 360° views, and use a Videor KBD1 Keyboard to control the camera and all the fully electronic PTZ functions.  At the same time, persons who enter a predefined area can be tracked automatically by the ‘Motion Tracking' function. "Features such as the integral motion detector, 4x zoom and intelligent alarm management are very helpful for us.  In particular the retrospective motion tracking, or the ‘Luggage Left' function that allows objects to be monitored in predefined areas.  The system immediately triggers an alarm when an exhibit is removed or, for example, an unattended bag is added," explained Sittig. High-resolution 360° recording"The 360° camera images are recorded by the ‘Almira R-01' Network Recorder which is matched especially to the Almira Camera," explained Peter Kleist.  "The recorder is connected over a high-speed data link and we installed it behind one of the columns.  It provides the advantage of also allowing execution of the full functionality of the 360° camera with a digital recorder - including the PTZ functions for the recorded pictures." Recording can be carried out controlled by events or time or also continuous; the 400 GB hard disk permits a recording time length of up to several weeks.  Furthermore, duplex operation allows simultaneous recording and replay.  In addition, it has extensive search functions, programmable pre- and post-alarm recording and sector naming for monitoring of obscured locations, such as the museum entrance area for example. Heer GmbH installed normal surveillance cameras in the outer area of the Rothschild Palace, which was built from 1812 to 1824.  A total of eleven eneo CCTV cameras monitor the exterior facades, barriers and the different entrances.  In addition to the 42" plasma monitor, their pictures are also switched to a further seven eneo control monitors at the cash desk and personnel entrance, and they are recorded by an eneo 16-channel DLR1 Digital Recorder in the control centre. Designed for discrete video surveillance Sittig is fully satisfied with the innovative camera system.  "The 360° camera with matching recorder is the optimum solution for us - the system fulfills all the criteria we require: it is easy to install, its virtual cameras have everything in view throughout the whole area and they, just like the Almira Recorder, deliver clear and sharp pictures.″In this project, the preventative use of the camera system that is seen immediately upon entering the building is rather unusual: the camera and recorder were designed for discrete video surveillance and can be housed nearly invisibly in the ceiling when required.  Such as the tiny cylinder camera that is installed barely noticeably above the entrance steps and which delivers first-class pictures.