Hanwha Techwin America Introduces Affordable HD Network Camera Range
Hanwha Techwin America Introduces Affordable HD Network Camera Range

Samsung has introduced five additional ‘affordable’ HD network camera models following on from the highly successful launch in June 2012 of the SNB-5001 1.3 megapixel network camera. “The level of interest in the SNB-5001 from customers across Europe has been remarkable but has not surprised us,” said Tim Biddulph, IP Product Manager for Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd. “We knew from our conversations with installers that there would be a greater demand for HD cameras that can capture evidence grade images if they could be offered at a price which would make them affordable for the majority of office and retail video surveillance projects. The introduction of these additional models will provide installers with the flexibility to choose a camera specification which matches their client’s specific requirements.” All of the ONVIF compliant models support H.264 and MJPEG compression methods, providing the option to simultaneously transmit images to multiple locations at various frame rates. A number of different users, if authorized, are therefore able to monitor live images at one location, record video evidence at another or view live and recorded images on a Smartphone or iPhone via the Samsung iPOLiS application. The five new models are: SND-5011 - 1.3 megapixel network dome camera with 3mm fixed lens SND-5061 - 1.3 megapixel network dome camera with 3~8mm varifocal lens SNB-7001 - 3 megapixel Full HD network camera SND-7011 - 3 megapixel Full HD network dome camera with 3mm fixed lens SND-7061 - 3 megapixel Full HD network dome camera with 3~8mm varifocal lens Each of the models are equipped with a scene change tampering feature which creates an alert if, for example, paint is sprayed on a camera lens or if there is unauthorized movement of a camera away from its usual field of view. Other shared features include four programmable Motion Detection zones, 12 programmable Privacy Zones and PoE (Power over Ethernet). The new models also have a Day/Night feature which automatically configures the camera to capture either colour or B/W images depending on the prevailing lighting conditions.  Fully compatible with Samsung’s license free NET-i-Viewer software, the cameras and domes have a multi–language webpage for easy set up. A short video which shows the SNB-5001 in action can be seen at: www.samsungsecurity.co.uk/videolibrary As is the case with all Samsung professional security products, the five new models are supplied with full support services from Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd, including free system design, free technical support and a full three-year warranty. Samsung’s professional security products are widely accessible across Europe via an extensive network of distributors. For further information please email STEsecurity@samsung.com or telephone +44 (0)1932 45 5308 or visit www.samsungsecurity.com

Add to Compare
Hanwha Techwin America Introduces 4CIF WDR Network Camera Range
Hanwha Techwin America Introduces 4CIF WDR Network Camera Range

Samsung’s new 4CIF WDR network camera range is designed to provide a competitively priced alternative option to megapixel cameras for video surveillance projects where very high quality images are required. Schools, hospitals, offices, factories, warehouses and  retail stores are just a few of the environments that  could benefit from the new 4CIF range which comprises the SNB-3002 boxed camera, the SND-3082 dome, the SND-3082F flush mounted dome and the SNV-3082 vandal resistant dome. “Customers’ expectations nowadays are very high in terms of the quality of the images they can expect to see captured by security cameras,” said Peter Ainsworth, Senior Product Manager for Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd.  “For the vast majority of applications it would seem unnecessary however to incur the cost of installing megapixel cameras when cameras such as those in our new 4CIF camera range, if positioned correctly,  are more than capable of generating evidence grade images. Apart from the capital cost savings which could be significant on large projects where a high number of cameras are required, 4CIF cameras are also far more bandwidth friendly than megapixel when images need to be viewed over a network.” The 4CIF camera range features Power over Ethernet which can reduce installation costs by providing both power and video/audio transmissions via a single Ethernet cable. It also offers multiple streaming, with a choice of MJPEG, MPEG-4 and H.264 compression methods, providing the option to simultaneously transmit images to multiple locations at various frame rates up to 25 frames per second, and at different resolutions. This allows different authorized users to monitor live images at one location, whilst recording video evidence at another. At the same time images can be saved onto an on-board SD memory card and email notifications of any incidents sent to a smartphone. The new models in the 4CIF network camera range incorporate Samsung’s A1 DSP chipset and are able to capitalize on Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) technology, which makes them ideal for locations where there may be strong contrasting lighting conditions. They also feature Progressive Scan which optimizes high quality video capture of moving objects, making it possible, for example, to read car number plates without a motion blur effect.  All four models have a true Day/Night function with infra-cut filter and a CCD image sensor which equips them to capture high quality color images when lighting is as low as 0.001 Lux with Sens-up and monochrome images at 0.0001 LUX with Sens-up. As well as standard motion detection, the Samsung’s 4CIF cameras have a scene change tampering feature which creates an alert if, for example, paint is sprayed on a camera lens or there is unauthorized movement of a camera away from its usual field of view. A bi-directional audio function offers effective two-way communication. 12 individual polygonal Privacy Zones ensure that windows, for example, in residential properties cannot be viewed, whilst Digital Image Stabilisation (DIS) can negate the effects of the camera shaking due to high winds or building vibration. As is the case with all Samsung professional security products, the 4CIF WDR network camera range is supplied with full support services from Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd, including free system design, free technical support and a full three-year warranty. For further information please email STEsecurity@samsung.com or telephone +44 (0)1932 45 5308 or visit www.samsungsecurity.com

Add to Compare
Hanwha Techwin America Launches Fully Weatherproof High Definition Network Camera
Hanwha Techwin America Launches Fully Weatherproof High Definition Network Camera

Samsung has introduced the SNO-5080R - a 1.3 megapixel weatherproof network bullet camera with built-in varifocal lens and IR LEDs, which is capable of delivering high definition 720p images, both during the day and at night.The SNO-5080R can be installed virtually out of the box as it incorporates all the component parts of an external IP66 rated weatherproof camera, including a varifocal lens, sun shield and bracket. Thanks to the inclusion of built-in IR LEDs, it is capable of capturing high definition images during daylight hours and in pitch-black darkness, making it suitable for a wide range of applications requiring effective 24-hour surveillance, including car parks, industrial estates, petrol forecourts, schools, hospitals, retail parks, airports and ports.The SNO-5080R features Samsung Techwin's WiseNet1 DSP chipset to deliver a host of advanced functions such as license-free Intelligent Video Analytics (IVA), which includes optical tripwire and enter/exit direction detection, as well as an Appear/Disappear function to detect the movement of objects. IVA also has a scene change tampering function, which creates an alert if, for example, paint is sprayed on a camera lens or there is unauthorized movement of a camera away from its usual field of view.The H.264, MPEG4, MJPEG and JPEG compression methods incorporated into the SNO-5080R provides users with the ability to simultaneously transmit images to multiple locations at various frame rates and at different resolutions allowing different users, if authorized, to simultaneously monitor live images at one location, whilst recording video evidence at another, whilst POE (Power over Ethernet) functionality reduces installation costs by providing both power and video/audio transmissions via a single Ethernet cable.The SNO-5080R also features Samsung Super Dynamic Range (SSDR) technology which automatically lightens the dark areas within a scene whilst maintaining the brighter areas at the same level to allow operators to view objects usually hidden in the shadows, and third generation Samsung Super Noise Reduction (SSNR) to eliminate image noise in low light conditions to enable bandwidth and recording space savings."The SNO-5080R can be described as a network camera truly suitable for virtually any external application requiring megapixel or high definition image capture," said Peter Ainsworth, Senior Product Manager Europe, Samsung Techwin Europe Limited. "It can be quickly and easily installed, as well as added onto the network without any fuss. What's more, as well as being extremely price competitive compared to any other comparable camera currently available, the SNO-5080R offers a huge bonus to installers looking to compete for projects involving large numbers of cameras, as they can make substantial savings by eliminating pre-build and installation costs."Available from all distributors of Samsung network products, the SNO-5080R is offered with full support services from Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd., including free system design, free technical support and a full three-year warranty.

Add to Compare

IP cameras - Expert commentary

The Benefits And Challenges Of In-Camera Audio Analytics For Surveillance Solutions
The Benefits And Challenges Of In-Camera Audio Analytics For Surveillance Solutions

Audio is often overlooked in the security and video surveillance industry. There are some intercom installations where audio plays a key role, but it’s not typically thought about when it comes to security and event management. Audio takes a back seat in many security systems because audio captured from a surveillance camera can have a different impact on the privacy of those being monitored. Audio surveillance is therefore subject to strict laws that vary from state to state. Many states require a clearly posted sign indicating audio recording is taking place in an area before a person enters. Analytic information derived from audio can be a useful tool and when implemented correctly, removes any concerns over privacy or legal compliance. Audio analytics on the edge overcomes legal challenges as it never passes audio outside of the camera Focused Responses To Events Audio analytics processed in the camera, has been a niche and specialized area for many installers and end users. This could be due to state laws governing audio recording, however, audio analytics on the edge overcomes legal challenges as it never passes audio outside of the camera Processing audio analytics in-camera provides excellent privacy since audio data is analysed internally with a set of algorithms that only compare and assess the audio content. Processing audio analytics on the edge also reduces latency compared with any system that needs to send the raw audio to an on-premises or cloud server for analysis. Audio analytics can quickly pinpoint zones that security staff should focus on, which can dramatically shorten response times to incidents. Audio-derived data also provides a secondary layer of verification that an event is taking place which can help prioritise responses from police and emergency personnel. Microphones And Algorithms Having a SoC allows a manufacturer to reserve space for specialized features, and for audio analytics, a database of reference sounds is needed for comparisonMany IP-based cameras have small microphones embedded in the housing while some have a jack for connecting external microphones to the camera. Microphones on indoor cameras work well since the housing allows for a small hole to permit sound waves to reach the microphone.  Outdoor cameras that are IP66 certified against water and dust ingress will typically have less sensitivity since the microphone is not exposed. In cases like these, an outdoor microphone, strategically placed, can significantly improve outdoor analytic accuracy. There are several companies that make excellent directional microphones for outdoor use, some of which can also combat wind noise. Any high-quality external microphone should easily outperform a camera’s internal microphone in terms of analytic accuracy, so it is worth considering in areas where audio information gathering is deemed most important. Surveillance cameras with a dedicated SoC (System on Chip) have become available in recent years with in-built video and audio analytics that can detect and classify audio events and send alerts to staff and emergency for sounds such as gunshots, screams, glass breaks and explosions. Having a SoC allows a manufacturer to reserve space for specialized features. For audio analytics, a database of reference sounds is needed for comparison. The camera extracts the characteristics of the audio source collected using the camera's internal or externally connected microphone and calculates its likelihood based on the pre-defined database. If a match is found for a known sound, e.g., gunshot, explosion, glass break, or scream, an event is triggered, and the message is passed to the VMS. If a match is found for a known sound, e.g., gunshot, explosion, glass break, or scream, an event is triggered, and the message is passed to the VMS Configuring A Camera For Audio Analytics Audio DetectionThe first job of a well-configured camera or camera/mic pair is to detect sounds of interest while rejecting ancillary sounds and noise below a preset threshold. Each camera must be custom configured for its particular environment to detect audio levels which exceed a user-defined level. Since audio levels are typically greater in abnormal situations, any audio levels exceeding the baseline set levels are detected as being a potential security event. Operators can be notified of any abnormal situations via event signals allowing the operator to take suitable measures. Finding a baseline of background noise and setting an appropriate threshold level is the first step. Noise ReductionA simple threshold level may not be adequate enough to reduce false alarms depending on the environment where a camera or microphone is installed. Noise reduction is a feature on cameras that can reduce background noise greater than 55dB-65dB for increased detection accuracy. Installers should be able to enable or disable the noise reduction function and view the results to validate the optimum configuration during setup. With noise reduction enabled, the system analyzes the attenuated audio source. As such, the audio source classification performance may be hindered or generate errors, so it is important to use noise reduction technology sparingly. Audio Source ClassificationIt’s important to supply the analytic algorithm with a good audio level and a high signal-to-noise ratio to reduce the chance of generating false alarms under normal circumstances. Installers should experiment with ideal placement for both video as well as audio. While a ceiling corner might seem an ideal location for a camera, it might also cause background audio noise to be artificially amplified. Many cameras provide a graph which visualises audio source levels to allow for the intuitive checking of noise cancellation and detection levels. Messages And EventsIt’s important to choose a VMS that has correctly integrated the camera’s API (application programming interface) in order to receive comprehensive audio analytic events that include the classification ID (explosion, glass break, gunshot, scream). A standard VMS that only supports generic alarms, may not be able to resolve all of the information. More advanced VMS solutions can identify different messages from the camera. Well configured audio analytics can deliver critical information about a security event, accelerating response times and providing timely details beyond video-only surveillance.  Analytics take privacy concerns out of the equation and allow installers and end users to use camera audio responsibly. Hanwha Techwin's audio source classification technology, available in its X Series cameras, features three customizable settings for category, noise cancellation and detection level for optimum performance in a variety of installation environments.

Video Surveillance Technologies Evolve To Meet Data And Cybersecurity Challenges
Video Surveillance Technologies Evolve To Meet Data And Cybersecurity Challenges

The Internet of Things (IoT) is having a significant and ever-changing impact on the way we view video security. Today, cameras are expected to be so much more than devices with which to simply capture images; they need to be far smarter than that. These future-facing cameras are becoming an integral part of the vast digital connectivity infrastructure, delivering a parallel performance as intelligent sensors with the ability to extract the kind of invaluable data that helps businesses make improvements in the area of video security, and beyond. However, as the list of possibilities grows, so too does the risk of unauthorized access by cybercriminals. We should all be aware that a single weak link in a communications infrastructure can give hackers access to sensitive data. That’s the bad news. Safeguarding Data And Utilizing Deep Learning The good news is cybercrime can be avoided by employing a data security system that’s completely effective from end-to-end. One technological advancement that the trend-spotters are predicting will become part of the video security vocabulary is ‘deep learning’ Once this level of safeguarding is in place you can begin to confidently explore the technologies and trends happening now, and those on the horizon. So, what will be having an influence on surveillance in 2018? Well, according to IHS Markit, one technological advancement that the trend-spotters are predicting will become part of the video security vocabulary is ‘deep learning’, which uses algorithms to produce multiple layers of information from the same piece of data, therefore emulating the way the human brain absorbs innumerable details every second. In Europe, GDPR compliance will also be a big talking point as new principles for video surveillance data collection, use limitation, security safeguards, individual participation and accountability are introduced. And, as the popularity – and misuse – of drones continues to rise, the recent developments in drone detection technology will be particularly welcomed by those whose primary concern relates to large areas, such as airport perimeter security. The Future Of 'Smart' Video Analytics An important feature of today’s intelligent cameras is the ability to provide smart video analytics. The Bosch ‘i’ series, for example, offers a choice of formats – Essential Video Analytics and Intelligent Video Analytics. Essential Video Analytics is geared toward regular applications such as small and medium businesses looking to support business intelligence (e.g. inter-network data transfer), large retail stores and commercial buildings for advanced intrusion detection, enforcing health and safety regulations (no-parking zones or detecting blocked emergency exits) and analyzing consumer behavior. The camera-based, real-time processing can also be used to detect discarded objects, issue loitering alarms and detect people or objects entering a pre-defined field. Intelligent Video Analytics provides additional capabilities. It is designed for demanding environments and mission-critical applications, such as the perimeter protection of airports, critical infrastructures and government buildings, border patrol, ship-tracking and traffic-monitoring (e.g. wrong-way detection, traffic-counts and monitoring roadsides for parked cars: all vital video security solutions). An important feature of today’s intelligent cameras is the ability to provide smart video analytics Intelligent Video Analytics can also differentiate between genuine security events and known false triggers, such as challenging environments created by snow, wind (moving trees), rain, hail, and water reflections. For more expansive areas, like an airport perimeter fence, the system has the range and capability to provide analysis over large distances. And, if a moving camera is employed, it is also possible to capture data on objects in transit when used in conjunction with the Intelligent Tracking feature. For roadside use, Intelligent Video Analytics systems, such as the Bosch MIC IP range, are resistant to vibrations and can still operate in extreme weather conditions, continuing to detect objects in heavy rain or snow.  Evolving Cameras Past Surveillance It’s becoming ever clearer that the IoT is transforming the security camera from a device that simply captures images, into an intelligent sensor that plays an integral role in gathering the kind of vital business data that can be used to improve commercial operations in areas beyond security. For example, cities are transitioning into smart cities. The capabilities of an intelligent camera extend to the interaction and sharing of information with other devices (only those you have appointed) With intelligent video security cameras at the core of an urban infrastructure smart data can be collected to optimize energy consumption via smart city lighting that responds to crowd detection and movement. Cameras can also be used to improve public transport by monitoring punctuality and traffic flow based on queue lengths, with the ability to control traffic lights an option should a situation require it. As the urban sprawl continues and this infrastructure grows, the need for more knowledge of its use becomes more essential, necessitating the monitoring technology developed for use by human operators to evolve into smart sensing technology, that no longer just provides video feeds, but also uses intelligent analytics and sophisticated support systems. These systems filter out irrelevant sensor data and present only meaningful events, complete with all relevant contextual data to operators to aid their decision-making. Expanding The Video Security Camera Network Today, video analytics technology has tangible benefits for human operator surveillance, and delivers KPIs that are highly relevant to transport operators, planners and city authorities. As an existing infrastructure, a video security camera network can be improved and expanded by installing additional applications rather than replaced. From a business perspective, that means greater value from a limited investment. Thereafter, the capabilities of an intelligent camera extend to the interaction and sharing of information with other devices (only those you have appointed), image and data interpretation, and the ability to perform a variety of tasks independently to optimize both your safety and business requirements. The fact is, cameras see more than sensors. Sounds obvious, but a conventional sensor will only trigger an alarm when movement is detected, whereas a camera can also provide the associated image and information like object direction, size, color, speed or type, and use time stamps to provide historical information regarding a specific location or event. Based on this evidence, the video security camera of today is more than ready for the challenges of tomorrow.

How Effective Security Departments Bust Multi-million Dollar Crimes
How Effective Security Departments Bust Multi-million Dollar Crimes

It had been a particularly slow night. The plant security guard had just made his rounds on this Sunday evening shift. As soon as he passed the weighing scales, he could enter the guard shack and get off his feet. Challenging A Curious Incident However, on this night, he noticed the waste vendor’s truck sitting half on and half off the scale. He stopped dead in his tracks to see if the truck would back up and completely sit on the scale. It never did. The observant guard walked up to the truck and challenged the driver who seemed surprised. “Hey, you’re not weighing your truck properly.” The driver fumbled for a response before replying, “Sorry, I was on the phone with a friend. I didn’t notice it.” But this security guard had the presence of mind to demand the driver’s phone. The driver was caught off guard and surrendered the phone. The guard then pulled up the most recent incoming/outgoing calls and saw no calls during the last 30 minutes. “I don’t think so.” “You don’t think so what?” The security guard was frank, “You haven’t used this phone in over half an hour.” The truck driver sheepishly acknowledged the fact. It was decided to install video surveillance covering the weighing area and scales – no easy feat due to poor lighting Preventing Crime As It Happens Knowing the driver was lying, the security guard ordered the truck back on the scale for a correct weighing and advised the driver that he would report the incident. The security guard wrote up his report and handed it off to his supervisor who, in turn, contacted the local corporate investigator. This investigator was soon on the phone with his boss at corporate headquarters on the other side of the world. Together with Security, they decided to install video surveillance covering the weighing area and scales – no easy feat due to poor lighting. However, once completed, they waited. They would not have to wait long. For the next two months, the waste vendor trucks, filled to the brim with production waste, black-and-white paper and other waste products from the plant, would stop on the scale only for a moment and then drive the front half of the truck off the scale for weighing. It was obvious that the vendor was cheating the company by only paying for half the waste. After two months, it was decided to catch the next cheating driver “en flagrante.” Sure enough, the next truck went half on and half off the scale and was weighed. Security then asked the unsuspecting driver to park his truck and invited him inside the building to talk to a supervisor. The driver signed an incriminating statement about the scheme and his role therein. They sent him on his way asking him to keep it quiet Waiting for the driver in a large office was the local investigator and his close friend, the Head of Security. After a difficult interview, the driver admitted to cheating on the scales over a two-year period—he claimed that some of the scale cheating was done at the direction of the vendor’s management, while some of it he did himself by “ripping off” the vendor—which he acknowledged was dangerous. Working With Authorities The driver signed an incriminating statement about the scheme and his role therein. They sent him on his way asking him to keep it quiet—they would see what they could do for him later on. In the meantime, Corporate Investigations had received a due diligence report on the vendor company which contained disturbing news—the company and its managers were associated with a countrywide waste management mafia. The report suggested that the vendor had a reputation for thefts and involvement in numerous lawsuits regarding thefts and embezzlement. Shockingly, no prior due diligence had ever been conducted on the vendor. Fortunately, the plant’s finance and audit team had maintained good records over the past 5 years and were able to re-construct the amount of waste going out the plant door and the amounts being claimed and paid for by the vendor. The discrepancy and loss stood at a multi-million dollar figure. After consulting with the local police authorities and company lawyers, it was decided to pursue a civil case against the vendor. Pursuing Legal Action The regional lawyer, the Head of Investigations, the Head of Security and the CFO invited the vendor to discuss the problem. Some of the evidence was shown to the vendor’s CEO who became indignant and, in order to save face, promised to fire the truck drivers and to repay any losses for the last two months. Inter-dependent entities - security, investigations, finance/audit and legal - combined their resources and agendas to form a unified front That was not enough for the company and a protracted legal battle ensued which lasted several years and resulted in the vendor’s paying almost the entire amount in instalments. The vendor was dropped from the contract and internal controls strengthened—the only plant employee dealing with the waste issue left the company and was replaced by two individuals. The plant also began paying more attention to the waste process and less to the production side. Several “lessons learned” come to mind. First, the tripwire came in the person of an astute and well-trained security guard who exhibited some of the best characteristics you want to see from men and women in that profession. The Security Department was also adept at installing the surveillance system and capturing the fraud live on videotape. But a far greater lesson was learned—of what can happen when inter-dependent entities (security, investigations, finance/audit and legal) within a company combine their resources and agendas to form a unified front. The results speak for themselves.