Lenel-ActivIdentity Joint Solution
Lenel-ActivIdentity Joint Solution

Lenel has partnered with ActivIdentity to jointly market a solution for physical access to facilities and logical access to networks.  The joint solution offers many benefits, including increased security and lower total cost of operation.  In addition, the Lenel-ActivIdentity solution will be a primary component for a corporation’s efforts to achieve compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley and HSPD-12. The ActivIdentity Enterprise Access Card consolidates employee logical credentials onto a single, secure smart card.  This provides a photo ID as well as a security device that enables secure Windows and network login, PC 'locking', secure remote access (VPN), secure email with digital signatures, and single sign-on to enterprise and desktop applications.The Lenel OnGuard® ID CredentialCenter™ application consolidates employee physical credentials, biometrics, and demographic information onto a single secure smart card, captures photo ID and prints the card.  The Lenel OnGuard security platform offers seamlessly integrated access control, alarm monitoring, identity management, digital video, intrusion detection, asset management, card production, and visitor management.The joint solution integrates the issuance and administration of cards and credentials for both physical and logical domains, and combines a photo ID, smart card and proximity card onto a single, easy to use device.  With the importance of physical and logical security, the integration of the Lenel and ActivIdentity products allows complete life cycle management of the credential.See the ActivIdentity Architecture diagram

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Lenel-ActivIdentity Joint Solution
Lenel-ActivIdentity Joint Solution

Lenel has partnered with ActivIdentity to jointly market a solution for physical access to facilities and logical access to networks.  The joint solution offers many benefits, including increased security and lower total cost of operation.  In addition, the Lenel-ActivIdentity solution will be a primary component for a corporation’s efforts to achieve compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley and HSPD-12. The ActivIdentity Enterprise Access Card consolidates employee logical credentials onto a single, secure smart card.  This provides a photo ID as well as a security device that enables secure Windows and network login, PC 'locking', secure remote access (VPN), secure email with digital signatures, and single sign-on to enterprise and desktop applications.The Lenel OnGuard® ID CredentialCenter™ application consolidates employee physical credentials, biometrics, and demographic information onto a single secure smart card, captures photo ID and prints the card.  The Lenel OnGuard security platform offers seamlessly integrated access control, alarm monitoring, identity management, digital video, intrusion detection, asset management, card production, and visitor management.The joint solution integrates the issuance and administration of cards and credentials for both physical and logical domains, and combines a photo ID, smart card and proximity card onto a single, easy to use device.  With the importance of physical and logical security, the integration of the Lenel and ActivIdentity products allows complete life cycle management of the credential.See the ActivIdentity Architecture diagram

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Lenel Offers Web Enabled Applications With OnGuard 2006
Lenel Offers Web Enabled Applications With OnGuard 2006

OnGuard 2006 seamlessly integrates access control, ID credential issuance and management, alarm monitoring, digital video surveillance and management, intelligent video, biometric technology integration, intrusion detection, visitor management and smart card functionality.  OnGuard 2006 marks Lenel’s entry into an XML Web Services architectural platform, with the introduction of web-enabled applications.  The web platform offers ease of deployment and maintenance, and system users can launch the applications from a PC using a standard web browser.  Another new component is Lenel IntelligentAudio™, an automated digital audio content analysis tool that can recognize, analyse and classify objects (information) in recorded audio files.  OnGuard 2006 is the first offering in the marketplace that enables biometric data to be used for both physical and logical access control.  OnGuard 2006 offers the first digital video management software that includes a suite of seamlessly integrated intelligent video tools that can be used for forensic video analysis.  Lenel is the first company to include these tools for all users without charge, as a basic component of the software.  OnGuard 2006 integrates with the Otis Compass destination dispatching system to provide secure access to banks of elevators.Other important capabilities include automatic rerouting of an alarm to an alternate workstation, integrated support for Integrated Engineering smart card encoders and biometric-smart card readers, digital video watermarking and authentication, and video matrix display on large-format video walls.Click here to download corporate brochure

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Access control software - Expert commentary

Managing Security During Unprecedented Times of Home Working
Managing Security During Unprecedented Times of Home Working

Companies are following government guidance and getting as many people as possible working from home. Some companies will have resisted home working in the past, but I’m certain that the sceptics will find that people can be productive with the right tools no matter where they are. A temporary solution will become permanent. But getting it right means managing risk. Access is king In a typical office with an on-premise data center, the IT department has complete control over network access, internal networks, data, and applications. The remote worker, on the other hand, is mobile. He or she can work from anywhere using a VPN. Until just recently this will have been from somewhere like a local coffee shop, possibly using a wireless network to access the company network and essential applications. CV-19 means that huge numbers of people are getting access to the same desktop and files, and collaborative communication toolsBut as we know, CV-19 means that huge numbers of people are getting access to the same desktop and files, applications and collaborative communication tools that they do on a regular basis from the office or on the train. Indeed, the new generation of video conferencing technologies come very close to providing an “almost there” feeling. Hackers lie in wait Hackers are waiting for a wrong move amongst the panic, and they will look for ways to compromise critical servers. Less than a month ago, we emerged from a period of chaos. For months hackers had been exploiting a vulnerability in VPN products from Pulse Secure, Fortinet, Palo Alto Networks, and Citrix. Patches were provided by vendors, and either companies applied the patch or withdrew remote access. As a result, the problem of attacks died back.  But as companies race to get people working from home, they must ensure special care is taken to ensure the patches are done before switching VPNs on. That’s because remote desktop protocol (RDP) has been for the most part of 2019, and continues to be, the most important attack vector for ransomware. Managing a ransomware attack on top of everything else would certainly give you sleepless nights. As companies race to get people working from home, they must ensure special care is taken to ensure the patches are done before switching VPNs on Hackers are waiting for a wrong move amongst the panic, and they will look for ways to compromise critical serversExposing new services makes them also susceptible to denial of service attacks. Such attacks create large volumes of fake traffic to saturate the available capacity of the internet connection. They can also be used to attack the intricacies of the VPN protocol. A flow as little as 1Mbps can perturbate the VPN service and knock it offline. CIOs, therefore, need to acknowledge that introducing or extending home working broadens the attack surface. So now more than ever it’s vital to adapt risk models. You can’t roll out new services with an emphasis on access and usability and not consider security. You simply won’t survive otherwise. Social engineering Aside from securing VPNs, what else should CIO and CTOs be doing to ensure security? The first thing to do is to look at employee behavior, starting with passwords. It’s highly recommended that strong password hygiene or some form of multi-factor authentication (MFA) is imposed. Best practice would be to get all employees to reset their passwords as they connect remotely and force them to choose a new password that complies with strong password complexity guidelines.  As we know, people have a habit of reusing their passwords for one or more online services – services that might have fallen victim to a breach. Hackers will happily It’s highly recommended that strong password hygiene or some form of multi-factor authentication (MFA) is imposedleverage these breaches because it is such easy and rich pickings. Secondly, the inherent fear of the virus makes for perfect conditions for hackers. Sadly, a lot of phishing campaigns are already luring people in with the promise of important or breaking information on COVID-19. In the UK alone, coronavirus scams cost victims over £800,000 in February 2020. A staggering number that can only go up. That’s why CIOs need to remind everyone in the company of the risks of clickbait and comment spamming - the most popular and obvious bot techniques for infiltrating a network. Notorious hacking attempts And as any security specialist will tell you, some people have no ethics and will exploit the horrendous repercussions of CV-19. In January we saw just how unscrupulous hackers are when they started leveraging public fear of the virus to spread the notorious Emotet malware. Emotet, first detected in 2014, is a banking trojan that primarily spreads through ‘malspam’ and attempts to sneak into computers to steal sensitive and private information. In addition, in early February the Maze ransomware crippled more than 230 workstations of the New Jersey Medical Diagnostics Lab and when they refused to pay, the vicious attackers leaked 9.5GB or research data in an attempt to force negotiations. And in March, an elite hacking group tried to breach the World Health Organization (WHO). It was just one of the many attempts on WHO and healthcare organizations in general since the pandemic broke. We’ll see lots more opportunist attacks like this in the coming months.   More speed less haste In March, an elite hacking group tried to breach the World Health Organization (WHO). It was just one of the many attempts on WHOFinally, we also have bots to contend with. We’ve yet to see reports of fake news content generated by machines, but we know there’s a high probability it will happen. Spambots are already creating pharmaceutical spam campaigns thriving on the buying behavior of people in times of fear from infection. Using comment spamming – where comments are tactically placed in the comments following an update or news story - the bots take advantage of the popularity of the Google search term ‘Coronavirus’ to increase the visibility and ranking of sites and products in search results. There is clearly much for CIOs to think about, but it is possible to secure a network by applying some well thought through tactics. I believe it comes down to having a ‘more speed, less haste’ approach to rolling out, scaling up and integrating technologies for home working, but above all, it should be mixed with an employee education program. As in reality, great technology and a coherent security strategy will never work if it is undermined by the poor practices

Home Monitoring At The Edge: Advanced Security In The Hands Of Consumers
Home Monitoring At The Edge: Advanced Security In The Hands Of Consumers

Imagine a home surveillance camera monitoring an elderly parent and anticipating potential concerns while respecting their privacy. Imagine another camera predicting a home burglary based on suspicious behaviors, allowing time to notify the homeowner who can in turn notify the police before the event occurs—or an entire network of cameras working together to keep an eye on neighborhood safety. Artificial Intelligence vision chips A new gen of AI vision chips are pushing advanced capabilities such as behavior analysis and higher-level security There's a new generation of artificial intelligence (AI) vision chips that are pushing advanced capabilities such as behavior analysis and higher-level security to the edge (directly on devices) for a customizable user experience—one that rivals the abilities of the consumer electronics devices we use every day. Once considered nothing more than “the eyes” of a security system, home monitoring cameras of 2020 will leverage AI-vision processors for high-performance computer vision at low power consumption and affordable cost—at the edge—for greater privacy and ease of use as well as to enable behavior analysis for predictive and preemptive monitoring. Advanced home monitoring cameras With this shift, camera makers and home monitoring service providers alike will be able to develop new edge-based use cases for home monitoring and enable consumers to customize devices to meet their individual needs. The result will be increased user engagement with home monitoring devices—mirroring that of cellphones and smart watches and creating an overlap between the home monitoring and consumer electronics markets. A quick step back reminds us that accomplishing these goals would have been cost prohibitive just a couple of years ago. Face recognition, behavior analysis, intelligent analytics, and decision-making at this level were extremely expensive to perform in the cloud. Additionally, the lag time associated with sending data to faraway servers for decoding and then processing made it impossible to achieve real-time results. Cloud-based home security devices The constraints of cloud processing certainly have not held the industry back, however. Home monitoring, a market just seven years young, has become a ubiquitous category of home security and home monitoring devices. Consumers can choose to install a single camera or doorbell that sends alerts to their phone, a family of devices and a monthly manufacturer’s plan, or a high-end professional monitoring solution. While the majority of these devices do indeed rely on the cloud for processing, camera makers have been pushing for edge-based processing since around 2016. For them, the benefit has always been clear: the opportunity to perform intelligent analytics processing in real-time on the device. But until now, the balance between computer vision performance and power consumption was lacking and camera companies weren’t able to make the leap. So instead, they have focused on improving designs and the cloud-centric model has prevailed. Hybrid security systems Even with improvements, false alerts result in unnecessary notifications and video recording Even with improvements, false alerts (like tree branches swaying in the wind or cats walking past a front door) result in unnecessary notifications and video recording— cameras remain active which, in the case of battery powered cameras, means using up valuable battery life. Hybrid models do exist. Typically, they provide rudimentary motion detection on the camera itself and then send video to the cloud for decoding and analysis to suppress false alerts. Hybrids provide higher-level results for things like people and cars, but their approach comes at a cost for both the consumer and the manufacturer. Advanced cloud analytics Advanced cloud analytics are more expensive than newly possible edge-based alternatives, and consumers have to pay for subscriptions. In addition, because of processing delays and other issues, things like rain or lighting changes (or even bugs on the camera) can still trigger unnecessary alerts. And the more alerts a user receives, the more they tend to ignore them—there are simply too many. In fact, it is estimated that users only pay attention to 5% of their notifications. This means that when a package is stolen or a car is burglarized, users often miss the real-time notification—only to find out about the incident after the fact. All of this will soon change with AI-based behavior analysis, predictive security, and real-time meaningful alerts. Predictive monitoring while safeguarding user privacy These days, consumers are putting more emphasis on privacy and have legitimate concerns about being recorded while in their homes. Soon, with AI advancements at the chip level, families will be able to select user apps that provide monitoring without the need to stream video to a company server, or they’ll have access to apps that record activity but obscure faces. Devices will have the ability to only send alerts according to specific criteria. If, for example, an elderly parent being monitored seems particularly unsteady one day or seems especially inactive, an application could alert the responsible family member and suggest that they check in. By analyzing the elderly parent’s behavior, the application could also predict a potential fall and trigger an audio alert for the person and also the family. AI-based behavior analysis Ability to analyze massive amounts of data locally and identify trends is a key advantage of AI at the edge The ability to analyze massive amounts of data locally and identify trends or perform searches is a key advantage of AI at the edge, for both individuals and neighborhoods. For example, an individual might be curious as to what animal is wreaking havoc in their backyard every night. In this case, they could download a “small animal detector” app to their camera which would trigger an alert when a critter enters their yard. The animal could be scared off via an alarm and—armed with video proof—animal control would have useful data for setting a trap. Edge cameras A newly emerging category of “neighborhood watch” applications is already connecting neighbors for significantly improved monitoring and safety. As edge cameras become more commonplace, this category will become increasingly effective. The idea is that if, for example, one neighbor captures a package thief, and then the entire network of neighbors will receive a notification and a synopsis video showing the theft. Or if, say, there is a rash of car break-ins and one neighbor captures video of a red sedan casing their home around the time of a recent incident, an AI vision-based camera could be queried for helpful information: Residential monitoring and security The camera could be asked for a summary of the dates and times that it has recorded that particular red car. A case could be made if incident times match those of the vehicle’s recent appearances in the neighborhood. Even better, if that particular red car was to reappear and seems (by AI behavior analysis) to be suspicious, alerts could be sent proactively to networked residents and police could be notified immediately. Home monitoring in 2020 will bring positive change for users when it comes to monitoring and security, but it will also bring some fun. Consumers will, for example, be able to download apps that do things like monitor pet activity. They might query their device for a summary of their pet’s “unusual activity” and then use those clips to create cute, shareable videos. Who doesn’t love a video of a dog dragging a toilet paper roll around the house? AI at the Edge for home access control Home access control via biometrics is one of many new edge-based use cases that will bring convenience to home monitoring Home access control via biometrics is one of many new edge-based use cases that will bring convenience to home monitoring, and it’s an application that is expected to take off soon. With smart biometrics, cameras will be able to recognize residents and then unlock their smart front door locks automatically if desired, eliminating the need for keys. And if, for example, an unauthorized person tries to trick the system by presenting a photograph of a registered family member’s face, the camera could use “3D liveness detection” to spot the fake and deny access. With these and other advances, professional monitoring service providers will have the opportunity to bring a new generation of access control panels to market. Leveraging computer vision and deep neural networks Ultimately, what camera makers strive for is customer engagement and customer loyalty. These new use cases—thanks to AI at the edge—will make home monitoring devices more useful and more engaging to consumers. Leveraging computer vision and deep neural networks, new cameras will be able to filter out and block false alerts, predict incidents, and send real-time notifications only when there is something that the consumer is truly interested in seeing. AI and computer vision at the edge will enable a new generation of cameras that provide not only a higher level of security but that will fundamentally change the way consumers rely on and interact with their home monitoring devices.

Top Things You Need To Include In Your Construction Site Security Checklist
Top Things You Need To Include In Your Construction Site Security Checklist

One of the responsibilities of construction project managers is to account for risks during the initial planning for a project and mitigate them. With all the tools, construction materials, and heavy machinery during the initial stages of a project, the construction site is a dangerous place to be at. However, this is not the only risk that project managers need to protect a site from. With plenty of valuables both physical and virtual within a construction site, it is also a prime target for theft and arson. Improving the security of construction sites It is important now more than ever that construction business owners and project managers invest in improving the security of construction sites. After all, security on construction sites is for the protection not only of valuable assets but also of workers and members of the public. Investing in adequate resources for construction site security can prevent several issues, including: Theft of expensive tools and construction equipment Cybersecurity breaches leading to loss of sensitive information such as invoice data Arson resulting in loss of life and property Vandalism of construction site property Trespassing by unauthorized parties and exposure to construction site dangers Risks of injuries that can result in litigation and legal claims Identifying security issues Having a dedicated security team in place is a good first step in bolstering a construction site’s security. They will be able to prevent theft, vandalism, and deter unauthorized personnel from entering the site. They can also identify security issues that can potentially arise and even respond quickly to accidents and other calamities should they occur. Having a dedicated security team in place is a good first step in bolstering a construction site’s security For a better implementation of construction site security measures, it is critical that business owners and managers assess an assessment of the site itself. This will help identify both internal and external risks that can affect the site’s security and guide project managers in putting systems in place to address them. Construction site security checklist To guide you, here is a sample template that you can use to form your own construction site security checklist.  SECURITY COORDINATION  YES   NO  1. Does the site have designated security coordinators?     2. Are the security coordinators available for contact during non-business hours?     3.  Does the construction site provide a means to contact the police, fire department, and other relevant authorities in case of emergencies?     4. Does the construction site have a written security plan, including procedures for specific scenarios?     5. If so, are construction site employees aware of the security plan?       GENERAL MACHINERY  YES   NO  1. Are all machinery adequately marked? (Identification number, corporate logo, tags, etc.)     2. Have all the machinery been inventoried? (Serial number, brand, model, value, etc.)     3. Does the project have a list of the names of operators handling the machinery?     4. Are all the machinery fitted with immobilizers and tracking devices when appropriate?     5. Are all the machinery stored in a secure area with a proper surveillance system?     6. Are the keys to the machinery stored in a separate, secure area?      TOOLS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT  YES   NO  1. Are all power tools and hand equipment marked? (Identification number, corporate logo, tags, etc.)     2. Have all power tools and hand equipment been inventoried? (Serial number, brand, model, value, etc.)     3. Are tools and equipment fitted with tags and tracking devices when appropriate?     4. Are tools and equipment stored in a secure place?      INVENTORY CONTROL  YES   NO  1. Is there a system in place to check material inventory to ensure they are not misplaced or stolen?     2. Are there procedures in place for checking materials that go in and out of the construction site?     3. Is there a set schedule for checking materials and equipment?     4. If so, do the records show that the schedule is followed strictly?     5. Are all material suppliers arriving for delivery properly identified? (e.g license plates, driver’s license, etc)      CONSTRUCTION SITE PERIMETER  YES   NO  1. Is there a physical barrier in place to secure the site?     2. Is the number of gates kept to a minimum?     3. Are there uniformed guards at every gate to check personnel and vehicles entering and leaving the site?     4. Are security warnings displayed prominently at all entry points?     5. Are entry points adequately secured? (With  industry-grade padlocks, steel chains, etc.)     6. Is there an alarm system?     7. Is the locking system integrated with the alarm?     8. Is the site perimeter regularly inspected?     9. Are “NO TRESPASSING” signs displayed prominently along the perimeter?      LIGHTING AND SURVEILLANCE  YES   NO  1. Is there sufficient lighting on the construction site?     2. Is there a dedicated staff member assigned to check if the lighting is working properly?     3. Is the site protected by CCTV cameras?     4. Are there signs posted on site indicating the presence of security cameras?     5. Are there motion detection lights installed on-site?      INTERNAL CONTROLS  YES   NO  1. Is there a policy on employee theft?     2. Are employees aware of the policy?     3. Are employees required to check in and check out company properties when using them?     4. Are staff members encouraged to report suspicious activity?     5. Is there a hotline employees can call to report security lapses and breaches?      SITE VISITORS  YES   NO  1. Are visitors checking in and out?     2. Are vehicles entering and exiting the site recorded?      CYBERSECURITY  YES   NO  1. Are the construction site’s documents and other sensitive data stored in the cloud securely?     2. Does the company have a strong password policy?     3. Are asset-tracking data accessible online?     4. Are confidential documents and data regularly backed up?     5. Are employees well-informed about current cyberattack methods such as phishing?     Security is a serious business in construction. Because of the dangers already present on your construction site, a lapse in security can have devastating effects on your business’s operations. Not only do you risk losing money in a security breach, but more importantly, you also risk endangering the lives of your site’s personnel and third parties.  Business owners and project managers need to make a concerted effort to educate employees about security and double down on their best practices for protecting their sites.

Latest LenelS2 news

LenelS2 Announces Major Enhancements To VRx Video Management Platform With Advanced Analytics
LenelS2 Announces Major Enhancements To VRx Video Management Platform With Advanced Analytics

LenelS2 announces major enhancements to VRx, a next-generation video management platform that features advanced analytics based on deep learning technology. VRx provides a unified access control and video surveillance experience when used in conjunction with LenelS2’s NetBox access control system, Magic Monitor® unified client and Cumulus cloud-based service. LenelS2, a provider of advanced security systems and services, is a part of Carrier, a provider of innovative heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, fire, security and building automation technologies. Advanced object detection VRx leverages deep learning for advanced object detection, providing users with enhanced situational awareness. The deep learning built into VRx takes in new video as data and uses the information to improve identification and classification algorithms over time. VRx provides the ability to detect a wide variety of objects such as backpacks, cars, trucks, people and animals, empowering users to quickly spot potential risks and respond accordingly. Forensic searches based on object detection make it possible to rapidly locate recorded video of interest and analyze events. “We call VRx a next-generation VMS because it goes beyond capturing and storing video to digitally analyzing it and enriching the data stream,” said John L. Moss, chief product officer, LenelS2. “Working with video as data is the defining characteristic of VRx.” Uploading crowdsourced video content VRx also enables users to upload crowdsourced video content from their smart devices to a VRx server, creating a more robust database for forensic investigations. The video can be viewed alongside recorded video from security cameras, providing security teams with additional information about a specific event. VRx seamlessly fits into the NetBox ecosystem, allowing the entire solution to easily scale with organizational growth. The Linux-based VRx appliance is plug-and-play and operates similarly to other NetBox ecosystem products, making it easy to set up, configure and maintain. A virtual machine option is also available.

LenelS2 OnGuard System Embedded With Validation Software Available From HID Global
LenelS2 OnGuard System Embedded With Validation Software Available From HID Global

LenelS2, a global provider of advanced access control systems and services, has received U.S. federal government approval for its updated OnGuard version 7.5 unified security solution, when paired with identity authentication and validation software from a globally renowned provider, HID Global. LenelS2 is a part of Carrier, a renowned global provider of innovative heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, fire, security and building. The OnGuard solution supports the Federal Identity, Credentialing and Access Management (FICAM) enterprise architecture, while offering a simple-to-deploy and cost-effective solution for government. FICAM1 is a set of security disciplines designed to ensure federal systems and facilities are used by the right person, at the right time, for the right reason.  Security management software In collaboration with HID Global, LenelS2 offers OnGuard version 7.5 with a suite of products using HID pivCLASS software After rigorous government and third-party security vulnerability and interoperability testing, the updated OnGuard security management software and LNL-X4420 intelligent controller with embedded authentication software is now on the General Services Administration’s (GSA) Approved Product List (APL). In collaboration with HID Global, LenelS2 offers OnGuard version 7.5 with a suite of products using HID pivCLASS software. Each LNL-X4420 includes HID authentication to support up to 16 authenticated readers using HID pivCLASS or alternatively using Veridt Stealth readers. "LenelS2 is committed to helping secure federal government facilities,” said Ryan Kaltenbaugh, Vice President, Federal Government Solutions, LenelS2. Hardware platforms and software solutions "We continue to innovate with open and proven hardware platforms and software solutions. Partnerships with industry leaders such as HID Global demonstrate our continuous commitment to government agencies needing fully compliant and approved solutions.” To learn more about the GSA APL-listed OnGuard solutions, the Approved Products List can be visited on the company’s official website. This solution is now available from an authorized LenelS2 Value Added Reseller (VAR).

LenelS2 Expands OnGuard Cloud Availability By Creating Amazon Machine Images
LenelS2 Expands OnGuard Cloud Availability By Creating Amazon Machine Images

LenelS2, a provider of advanced security systems, continues its move to the cloud with its flagship enterprise security platform OnGuard using the new OnGuard Cloud Edition to run in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) environment.   A pre-configured version of the OnGuard platform enables value-added resellers (VARs) to rapidly deploy the software without lengthy installation or the need for onsite servers. LenelS2 is a part of Carrier, a global provider of innovative heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, fire, security and building automation technologies.  Amazon Machine Images   OnGuard’s cloud capabilities have been expanded by creating Amazon Machine Images (AMIs), a pre-configured operating system and virtual machine within the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2). These are made available to resellers and end users via the AMI listings. Following deployment, AMIs can be customized to meet an end user’s specific needs.  “We recognize cloud availability as a tremendous opportunity not only for our value-added resellers, but also for our end-user community,” said Jeff Stanek, President, LenelS2.  “The OnGuard Cloud Edition offers the opportunity to reduce or eliminate the need for onsite OnGuard server hardware and the operational costs that accompany it. Also, the latest AMIs enable end users to evaluate new versions of OnGuard prior to full commercial deployment.”  OnGuard Cloud Edition  We can now build and deploy OnGuard Cloud Edition into our customer’s cloud networks" M.C. Dean, an integrator of LenelS2 products to the federal government based in Tysons, V.A., collaborated on expanding OnGuard’s cloud capabilities using the cloud-based AMIs.  “We are excited to add OnGuard Cloud Edition to M.C. Dean’s growing portfolio of managed security cloud services,” said Bill Dean, Chief Executive Officer, M.C. Dean. “We can now build and deploy OnGuard Cloud Edition into our customer’s cloud networks in under a day to provide 24/7 centralized monitoring and management from our cloud security operations center.”  Standard OnGuard licensing  LenelS2 offers two OnGuard Cloud Edition AMIs; one for smaller deployments and a Pro version for larger installations. In both cases, users run the OnGuard system in the cloud while continuing to use standard OnGuard licensing.  Previous and current releases of OnGuard software also support cloud-based deployment through Microsoft Azure, including support for Azure Active Directory and Azure SQL Database, providing users with the option to subscribe rather than buy licenses for these services.  

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