Honeywell Unveiled Its Flexible Wireless Cylinder Solution
Honeywell Unveiled Its Flexible Wireless Cylinder Solution

Honeywell recently announced the DLC-Online Wireless Cylinder solution, a reliable, secure, wireless and online access control and arming system for doors. It is ideal for large office buildings, department stores, small and medium company facilities, and assets that need to be secured with an access control and intruder alarm. The DLC-Online wireless cylinder solution has been designed to deliver full online access control rights management for greater end-user flexibility and lower overall system cost. The solution comprises a wireless cylinder or fitting (DLC/DLF) communicating over a traffic point. One traffic point can have up to 8 cylinders or wireless fittings connected. Wireless communications to doors offers greatest flexibility and cost savings by eliminating the need to for costly hard wiring. The wireless communication technology is a proprietary system for maximum security using encryption, authentication, short online times and a fixed assignment of DLC/DLFs to a traffic point. The best security in class opens up a wider range of installations. Each DLC/DLF provides a reader for arming/disarming, a blocking element, a reader for access control and a door strike. This approach delivers maximum flexibility because any access control door can be expanded with arming/disarming functionality, while no additional blocking elements are needed, and the DLC/DLF are disabled for access while armed. And it greatly minimizes the risk of false alarms. The DLC-Online is very easy to install and an ideal solution for security installers looking to fit access control and arming/disarming without reworking the doors. The solution works with both the Honeywell intruder alarm MB Series (MB) and the ACS-8 Access control panel by simply updating the panel firmware. Application relevant data such as key codes and access times can be easily and quickly programmed through Honeywell's access control rights management software IQ MultiAccess and IQ SystemControl. The end-user gets full flexibility with online access control and easy access control rights management. Any installation can be upgraded as traffic points can be up to 1200 m away from an IK3 evaluation unit, a door control module for MB or an ACS linkable access controller. The installer just needs to position traffic points around the site and connect to an RS-485 bus. Programming of wireless cylinders is performed within the standard IK3 programming menu or in the IQ NetEdit menu - installers just have to add wireless doors and arming units. The wireless address of cylinders and fittings can be easily programmed with IQ MultiAccess using the IrDa adapter before being installed on site. Additional support for the Dorma DLC and DLF gives the installer a large choice of cylinders and fittings. Dorma software tools fully integrate with IQ MultiAccess to deliver the same user interface and look-and-feel for existing customers. Through the wide range of mechanical components a lot of scenarios can be covered.  "Our new wireless cylinder solution gives a massive advantage to end-users looking to expand the access control and intrusion alarm capabilities for a higher level of security," said Stephan Winkelmann, Marketing Leader for Germany, Austria and Switzerland (DACH) at Honeywell Security Group. "By adding wireless capabilities to DLC/DLFs we are significantly simplifying the deployment and management of an online access control and arming solution for doors while driving down the overall system costs."

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Electronic lock systems - Expert commentary

Moving to Sophisticated Electric Locking
Moving to Sophisticated Electric Locking

In part one of this feature, we introduced the shotbolt – a solenoid actuator – as the workhorse at the heart of most straightforward electric locking systems. Shotbolts remain at the core of most sophisticated electric locking solutions as well. But they are supplemented by materials and technologies that provide characteristics suited to specialist security applications. Here we look at some more demanding electric locking applications and contemporary solutions. Preventing forced entry Where the end of the shotbolt is accessible, the electric holding force can be overcome by physical force. That’s why anti-jacking technology is now a frequent feature of contemporary electric solenoid lock actuators. Anti-jacking, dead-locking or ‘bloc’ technology (the latter patented by MSL) is inherent to the way the locking assembly is designed to suit the requirements of the end application. The patented bloc anti-jacking system is highly effective and incorporated into many MSL shotbolts deployed in electric locking applications. The bloc technology uses a ring of steel balls in a shaped internal housing to physically jam the actuated bolt in place. A range of marine locks is widely used on Superyachts for rapid lockdown security from the helm Real life applications for MSL anti-jacking and bloc-equipped shotbolts include installation in the back of supermarket trucks to secure the roller shutter. Once locked from the cab, or remotely using radio technology, these shutters cannot be forced open by anyone with ‘undesirable intentions’ armed with a jemmy. A range of marine locks is widely used on Superyachts for rapid lockdown security from the helm. While anti-jacking features are an option on these shotbolts, consideration was given to the construction materials to provide durability in saltwater environments. Marine locks use corrosion-proof stainless steel, which is also highly polished to be aesthetically pleasing to suit the prestigious nature of the vessel while hiding the innovative technology that prevents the lock being forced open by intruders who may board the craft. Rotary and proportional solenoids sound unlikely but are now common A less obvious example of integrated technology to prevent forced override is a floor lock. This lock assembly is mounted beneath the floor with round-top stainless-steel bolts that project upwards when actuated. They are designed to lock all-glass doors and are arguably the only discreet and attractive way to lock glass doors securely. In a prestigious installation at a historic entranceway in Edinburgh University, the floor locks are remotely controlled from an emergency button behind the reception desk. They act on twin sets of glass doors to quickly allow the doors to close and then lock them closed with another set of subfloor locks. No amount of stamping on or hitting the 15mm protruding bolt pin will cause it to yield, thus preventing intruders from entering. Or leaving! Explosion proofing In many environments, electric locking technology must be ATEX certified to mitigate any risk of explosion. For example, remote electric locking is used widely on oil and gas rigs for stringent access control, general security and for emergency shutter release in the event of fire. It’s also used across many industrial sectors where explosion risks exist, including flour milling, In many environments, electric locking technology must be ATEX certified to mitigate any risk of explosionpowder producers, paint manufacture, etc. This adds a new dimension to the actuator design, demanding not only intrinsically safe electrical circuits and solenoid coils, but the careful selection of metals and materials to eliminate the chance of sparks arising from moving parts. Resilience under pressure The technology boundaries of solenoids are always being pushed. Rotary and proportional solenoids sound unlikely but are now common. More recently, while not directly related to security in the traditional sense, proportional solenoid valves for accurately controlling the flow of hydrogen and gases now exist. Magnet Schultz has an extensive and somewhat innovative new range of hydrogen valves proving popular in the energy and automotive sectors (Fig. 2-6). There’s a different kind of security risk at play here when dealing with hydrogen under pressures of up to 1050 bar. Bio security Less an issue for the complexity of locking technology but more an imperative for the effectiveness of an electric lock is the frequent use of shotbolts in the bio research sector. Remote electric locking is commonplace in many bioreactor applications. Cultures being grown inside bioreactors can be undesirable agents, making 100% dependable locking of bioreactor lids essential to prevent untimely access or the unwanted escape of organisms. Again, that has proven to be topical in the current climate of recurring coronavirus outbreaks around the world. More than meets the eye In part one, I started by headlining that there’s more to electric lock actuation in all manner of security applications than meets the eye and pointed out that while electric locking is among the most ubiquitous examples of everyday security, the complexity often involved and the advanced technologies deployed typically go unnoticed.Integrating the simplest linear actuator into a complex system is rarely simple For end users, that’s a very good thing. But for electro-mechanical engineers designing a system, it can present a challenge. Our goal at Magnet Schultz is to provide a clearer insight into today’s electric locking industry sector and the wide range of locking solutions available – from the straightforward to the specialized and sophisticated. Integrating the simplest linear actuator into a complex system is rarely simple. There’s no substitute for expertise and experience, and that’s what MSL offers as an outsource service to designers. One benefit afforded to those of us in the actuator industry with a very narrow but intense focus is not just understanding the advantages and limitations of solenoid technology, but the visibility of, and participation in, emerging developments in the science of electric locking. Knowing what’s achievable is invaluable in every project development phase.

Providing Fast and Secure Access in Life-Threatening Emergencies
Providing Fast and Secure Access in Life-Threatening Emergencies

A defibrillator can save the life of a person suffering from cardiac arrest – but it is most effective when used in the first few minutes of the patient collapsing. Studies have shown that a shock given within the first three minutes provides the best chance of survival and even one minute of further delay can substantially lower the chances of recovering. Public Access Defibrillators (PADs) were created to allow untrained members of the public to deliver life-saving treatment in those precious minutes before an ambulance arrives. There are currently over 10,000 in the UK, located in parks, offices, high streets and sporting venues, and they are especially popular in rural communities, where ambulance response times are longer. Every second counts Over the years there has been a long-running debate as to whether PADs should be kept openly accessible or locked. Leaving them open could lead to theft, vandalism or misuse. Leaving them locked could mean that precious moments are lost waiting for a local guardian to arrive – and could even cost a life. To save as many lives as possible, it’s clear that PADs need to be available 24/7, fully operational and easily accessible to users and local guardians. But there is a solution that can meet all these conditions – a lock that can protect against vandalism while providing convenient instant access when required. Life-saving solutions Over the years there has been a long-running debate as to whether PADs should be kept openly accessible or lockedDigital locks are ideal for securing PADs because they don’t require a key, and anyone can be given access over the phone. In the case of a cardiac arrest, the user calls 999 and the ambulance controller provides them with a simple, easy-to-remember code. The ambulance controller can then advise them, step by step, what to do. Local guardians, who have responsibility for the PAD, can be provided with an override key to enable them to monitor and maintain the defibrillator. The PAD cabinets built by Duchy Defibrillators show exactly how this works in practice. Based in rural Cornwall, Duchy Defibrillators manufactures, supplies and installs monitored PAD cabinets. To provide public access to the defibrillators, it needed a lock that could keep its cabinets secure, make them easily accessible and withstand the stormy Cornish weather. Codelocks recommended a digital electronic lock that could operate on a standalone battery, making it especially suitable for remote areas. As well as offering flexible access, digital locks come with a range of varying options and functions to suit different applications. As Duchy Defibrillator cabinets are installed in a wide variety of locations and sometimes need to withstand outdoor exposure, it opted for a robust electronic digital lock that is both affordable and easy to set up. A digital-access revolution Using smart locks in combination with a dedicated app or portal allows operators to send time-sensitive codes to end-users The example of Duchy Defibrillators shows how digital locks can be used to keep defibrillator cabinets secure while affording instant access to users when they are needed. But the flexibility of digital locks also makes them suitable for securing property and equipment in a wide variety of situations, especially for shared and public facilities. This is why you’ll increasingly see digital locks used to secure restricted areas in hospitals, schools and offices, as well as shared facilities like hotel and gym lockers, public restrooms and more. Digital locks are available for a number of specific applications, including doors, lockers and cabinets. They can range from simple mechanical locks through to more sophisticated electronic locks and state-of-the-art smart locks. Using smart locks in combination with a dedicated app or portal allows operators to send time-sensitive codes to end users – making them very popular for contactless entry and with facilities managers that need to manage access to buildings and campuses. One thing is certain – whatever your access control requirements are, there’s a keyless lock solution to suit. The digital access revolution is here.

Automatic Gates: Making The Right Investment For Access Control
Automatic Gates: Making The Right Investment For Access Control

The experience of the COVID-19 pandemic has made us all more conscious of who is coming and going from our property. Whether it is a family home, business premises or public building, property owners want full control over access for protection and peace of mind. As a provider of access control technologies, we are seeing a growing demand for automated gates with a variety of access control systems. There are a number of considerations that buyers need to make when investing. And as an installer, there is advice that you can offer to help your clients make the right choice for their property. Here are some of the key considerations you’ll need to make and discuss with your client. Whomever you buy from, you should be offered more than a simple instruction manual. Electronic locks, magnetic locks and code security In the first instance, you’ll need to advise on the type of lock and access control available. Electronic locks release on the operation of the automation system to allow the gates to open. Locks are required for all non-locking (also known as reversible) operators and are recommended for any gate on a multi-user site or any gate over 2.5m. Apply the same logic to an automated gate as you would to a domestic door – for example, you wouldn’t fit your front door with a lock on the same side as the hinges or a drop bolt at the hinge end of a manual gate so why dispense with this logic when the gate is automated? Electronic locks release on the operation of the automation system to allow the gates to open There are a number of locks on the market including magnetic locks, drop locks that “shoot” a bolt into the ground and side latching locks. These are all designed for external use. While the gate itself will provide physical security, the customer will want to feel in control of who enters their property, when and for what purpose. Consider access for mail and deliveries, waste disposal and visitors arriving on foot etc. There is a range of options available. Intercom systems will allow the user to vet visitors, keypad entry can allow remote access for visitors with a specific code, remote controls allow an oncoming driver to open the gates without getting out of the vehicle, and a timer control can be used to open or close the gates at certain times of the day. Vehicle detection loops can be installed discreetly under the tarmac allowing the presence of vehicles to exit the gates and prevent closing while obstructed. Sliding gates versus swinging gates There are a number of locks on the market including magnetic locks, drop locks that “shoot” a bolt into the ground and side latching locks Gates can be automated to either swing or to slide open and in the case of swinging gates, the opener may be concealed underground or gate mounted. The most suitable opener for your installation will depend on the space available and the type of gate selected. Concealed underground automation is ideal for highly ornate gates. However, where gates are fully infilled (typical of many timber designs), gate mounted openers are concealed from the front of the gate by the gate leaf and present a cost-effective option. The choice between slide and swing is largely down to space - swing gates require a clear space for their opening arc while sliding gates require space to one or both sides of the gate. Sliding gates are perhaps the best choice where the drive slopes or when drive space is limited, as they use the least space when opening. Voltage Most swing gate and sliding systems are available in 24v or 230v. The 24v systems still need 230v mains power – there is a transformer built into the 24v control panels. Deciding which voltage to use can include a combination of factors such as the material of the gates, the location of the system and the safety features you want. Concealed underground automation is ideal for highly ornate gates With wrought iron gates, the wind can pass through them whereas with fully boarded wooden gates (popular because they give full privacy) the wind has nowhere to go, so they act like sails. For commercial or industrial applications with larger entrances and a heavy gate, you may need 3 Phase 400v power (sliding gates only). Installing gate motors in confined spaces The environment in which you are fitting may well influence which gate and motor you recommend. Will it be in an exposed area which is subject to the elements? Will it be positioned on a slope? Sliding gates are perhaps the best choice where the drive slopes or when drive space is limited Installers have always faced the challenge of installing gate motors in confined spaces. When fitting a pedestrian gate, there is often limited space in which to work – potentially making an installation time consuming and technically demanding. If this is the case for you, consider a gate operator which is designed specifically for installations with limited space for maneuver. An example of this is the E5 compact gate operator. The operator is not only small but has an optional slide lever attachment designed for installations where there is extremely limited space, meaning that just 8cm of the pillar is needed for installation. What’s more, improved fixing points and a simple ‘hook and fasten’ process means assembly is safe, quick and straight forward. Ultimately, you’ll be looking for a good quality, reliable product with good service. Work with a supplier that offers more than just a manual. If they are happy to offer training, their time and advice when you buy, the chances are you’ll get their support long term.

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ASSA ABLOY Integrates Aperio Wireless Lock Technology With Connect ONE Platform From Connected Technologies
ASSA ABLOY Integrates Aperio Wireless Lock Technology With Connect ONE Platform From Connected Technologies

ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions completed the integration of their Aperio® wireless lock technology with the Connect ONE® cloud-hosted management platform from Connected Technologies, Monument, Colo. Connect ONE manages all connected customer devices, including wireless and hardwired locks, access control, intrusion, video surveillance, critical environmental monitoring and energy management from a single interface. “We’re excited to present this integration with industry leading ASSA ABLOY Aperio wireless devices to Connect ONE dealers,” said Mike Simon, Managing Partner of Connected Technologies. Global wireless platform “Now, dealers can easily expand their services to more doors and offer new protection possibilities that save installation time and money. In addition, the Aperio/Connect ONE integration works with popular Bosch, DMP, ELK and Honeywell Vista panels so they can be up and running with new specs quickly.” The Aperio integration offers Connect ONE customers an easy way to connect additional wireless locks to new and existing installations. Aperio is a global wireless platform that works with extensive locking hardware options from ASSA ABLOY Group brands, offering the flexibility to address a variety of applications throughout any facility. The platform uses wireless communication (IEEE 802.15.4) between the lock and an Aperio hub to provide real-time communication to the access control system, simplifying installation and reducing costs. Encrypted wireless connection The integration also allows for a mapped hardwired relay output to initiate an auxiliary control upon access Aperio wireless locks map directly to the intrusion areas for an immediate armed status review to deny access when armed and can also disarm intrusion with proper authority upon granted access at the lock. Since the wireless locks are highly integrated with the control panel, user permissions are applied exactly the same for hardwired readers, allowing for a mix of wireless and hardwired reader/locks without additional set-up complexity. The integration also allows for a mapped hardwired relay output to initiate an auxiliary control upon access and a relay output to control an external door opener. Aperio locks use an encrypted wireless connection to an Aperio IP hub; each hub can communicate to a maximum of 64 locks. Highly flexible solution “Connect ONE offers a simple, scalable solution that complements the Aperio offering perfectly,” stated Mark Duato, Executive Vice President, Aftermarket, ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions Americas. “This integration will offer dealers and end-users a highly flexible solution for comprehensive access management.” Connect One’s ScanPass® Mobile Credential smartphone control is also supported with the integration, eliminating the need for card or fob credentials. Dealers can contact ASSA ABLOY to become certified to offer Aperio locks, which come in a variety of form factors and can be purchased through ASSA ABLOY Authorized Channel Partners.

Sydney’s Gateway Building integrates Boon Edam Turnstiles with IDEMIA’s MorphoWave touchless scanners and Honeywell access control
Sydney’s Gateway Building integrates Boon Edam Turnstiles with IDEMIA’s MorphoWave touchless scanners and Honeywell access control

Boon Edam Inc., a globally renowned company in security entrances and architectural revolving doors, has announced that Dexus Wholesale Property Fund has upgraded the Gateway Building in Sydney’s Circular Quay to feature entry security measures to protect employees, visitors and valuable data. The ideal solution was found by integrating Boon Edam Speedlane Swing optical turnstiles, IDEMIA’s MorphoWave touchless fingerprint scanners, Schindler’s elevator dispatch and Honeywell’s access control technology. Integration with MorphoWave touchless reader MorphoWave scans and verifies four fingerprints through a simple hand wave gesture Gateway’s access solution allows authorized and registered tenants to simply wave their hand in the MorphoWave touchless fingerprint scanner reader to enter the secure area through the turnstiles. Guests can sign in and register their finger pattern to become authorized to enter. MorphoWave scans and verifies four fingerprints through a simple hand wave gesture, during which the sensor takes several 3D photos of the fingerprints to extract biometric data and compare with the authorized fingerprints stored in the device. If they match, the user is granted access. This process all happens in less than one second. Featuring Schindler’s PORT Technology Each MorphoWave reader is connected to Schindler’s PORT Technology, which then receives the user’s credential data and conducts a cross-check with the building’s access control database. If the user is valid, a command is sent to the Boon Edam Lifeline Speedlane Swing to open its barriers. This interaction is surprisingly quick, with limited latency. “Tenants have a duty of care to protect their employees and visitors as well as valuable data and intellectual property, and they need the cooperation and support of a responsible and innovative building manager such as Dexus to manage secure entry into the building,” said Michael Fisher, Managing Director, Boon Edam Australia. Seamless access control integration A major part of the solution involves elevator destination control, whereby a user’s credentials are automatically assigned an elevator as they are verified and allowed access through the turnstile. This seamless integration was facilitated by an existing global partnership between Boon Edam and Schindler. The partnership arranged for Schindler’s PORT 4 mini technology to be embedded into the Speedlane Swing optical turnstiles at the manufacturing stage in the Boon Edam factory. Using an advanced algorithm and the integrated Schindler PORT 4 mini elevator destination control for visual and audio feedback, an elevator is automatically assigned, at the same time the turnstile is opening, allowing for optimum efficiency. The security is controlled by Honeywell’s access control system, integrated with Schindler’s PORT Technology. Honeywell access control system Honeywell has managed the security and building management systems for the Gateway building since 1990 Honeywell has been managing the security and building management systems for the Gateway building since it was first opened in 1990. Honeywell Asia-Pacific Solution Architect Leader Rhys Crabb said “Early engagement at all stages and a commitment to a collaborative approach enabled Dexus to select the best available technologies. Dexus placed customer outcomes first and foremost in the project brief, ensuring the delivery of a product that provided tenants and visitors with a premium, modern and secure user experience that is flexible and easy to use.” Boon Edam optical turnstiles Mr. Stephen Hodge, Senior Project Manager, Dexus, said “With so many stakeholders, and a strong need for reliability and quality, it was important that everyone knew the goals of the project and worked well together. I’m pleased to say that it was like a perfect jigsaw and everything came together smoothly." Stephen adds, “What was important to Dexus is that we were pushing the boundaries to create better experiences, but we’re only doing so with proven products. Boon Edam’s optical turnstiles have been installed globally and locally, and this gave us added confidence that they were the right product for this forward-looking project.” Enhanced building security “Another significant help with this project was that the companies involved built a prototype, located at Schindler’s Head Office based in Sydney, so that the Dexus management and technical teams could test the solution well in advance of implementing it at Gateway,” Hodge continued. He further stated, “It gave us peace of mind that we’d selected the right suppliers. We have tenants in Gateway who requested ground floor security, so we went out to tender to seek the best combination of sophisticated security and elegance, without being obtrusive to the building’s users.” Touchless fingerprint scanners for privacy Touchless fingerprint scanners were chosen to control access to secured floors and areas of the building Touchless fingerprint scanners were chosen to control access to secured floors and areas of the building, because they provide an extra level of privacy that was attractive to tenants. “A computer algorithm converts each person’s unique fingerprint signature into binary code, zeroes and ones, and uses that code to grant access,” explained Mr. Hodge, adding “Boon Edam turnstiles have the ability to integrate facial recognition, which could be highly valuable in other projects, but the fingerprint scanners were the right fit for this building. Boon Edam made it simple to integrate the scanners with their optical turnstiles, which helped us meet project deadlines.” Effective management of system installations For such a complex project, installation always has its challenges, including managing installation work as people continue to use the building. Mr. Bill Garrett, Facility Manager at Gateway Building, was impressed by Boon Edam’s service and installation team. He said, “The Boon Edam installation team always ensured safety was the number one priority and they did a quality job, even with some very difficult-to-access areas.” Garrett adds, “I’m delighted with the result of the project. One of the major benefits of the new entry system is that there’s a dedicated underground entrance for tradespeople, couriers and deliveries, which removes congestion and bulky carts from the main lobby. It’s all about enhancing the user experience, and Gateway will set a new benchmark for a seamless, secure and aesthetically pleasing entry.” Staged approach towards system implementation The testing, combined with the staged approach, allowed for a smooth transition to the new security technology" Mr. Garrett explained that to get tenants used to a totally new system, they adopted a staged approach. At first, the turnstiles were put into place but left in the open position and after an initial period, some of the turnstiles were closed so that tenants could try entering using the new technology, if they wished. Finally, the entire system was fully implemented. “In addition to this staged approach, we met with key tenants and allowed them to test the system in advance. The testing, combined with the staged approach, allowed for a smooth transition to the new security technology,” said Garrett. Scope of touchless access control technologies Now that the technology has been successfully rolled out at Gateway, Dexus is looking at other locations that could utilize the same harmony of security technologies. “We are continuing to assess opportunities to implement touchless technologies in new developments as well as in our existing buildings,” said Mr. Hodge. “The stylish and secure entrance at Gateway has been ideal through the COVID-19 pandemic. It manages flow, queries guests on recent visits to pandemic hotspots, if they are feeling any symptoms, and can record all entrants to the building, helping us meet government requirements. And the same features will be beneficial in a broader context, too, to help mitigate against unauthorized entry,” concludes Hodge. Dexus is actively exploring the possibility of rolling out similar security entrance systems in other buildings, thereby delivering the seamless balance of security and elegance.

Dahua Technology Installs HD CCTV Cameras With Smart Analytics Using AI To Secure Iconic Battle Of Britain Bunker
Dahua Technology Installs HD CCTV Cameras With Smart Analytics Using AI To Secure Iconic Battle Of Britain Bunker

An important heritage site which played a key role in protecting the UK during World War II is itself being made safe and secure with the installation of a comprehensive and fully integrated security system, including more than 75 Dahua HD CCTV cameras. Battle of Britain Bunker The Battle of Britain Bunker is an underground operations room in Uxbridge, formerly used by No. 11 Group Fighter Command during the Second World War, most notably in the Battle of Britain and on D-Day. The operations room was one of the key parts of the world’s first integrated defense system, which linked Fighter Command with Anti-Aircraft Command, Barrage Balloon Command, the Observer Corps, radar, and the intelligence services. The site is run by Hillingdon Council as a heritage attraction with a museum and a visitor center. Fully integrated security solution DSSL Group installed more than 75 Dahua HD CCTV cameras linked to a Genetec Security Center VMS DSSL Group completed a full analysis of the existing CCTV and intruder alarm systems, with the aim of creating a fully integrated security solution, to enhance the security around the site, reduce manned security costs, and speed up remote security and police response times. Using the existing wireless network also designed by them across the borough, DSSL Group installed more than 75 Dahua HD CCTV cameras linked to a Genetec Security Center video management system (VMS), as well as Axis IP PA speakers externally. All cameras are viewable by management and the security team on site, and also from Hillingdon Council’s main CCTV control room. Surveillance cameras with smart analytics using AI External cameras are equipped with smart analytics using AI, to help secure the perimeter of the site. In 2018, a state-of-the-art wireless CCTV system consisting of more than 1,000 Dahua HD cameras, along with Dahua NVRs, XVRs and control and viewing equipment, was installed across the borough by DSSL Group. More recently, an additional 1,000 Dahua HD cameras have been added to the council's network making it 2,000 in total. In addition to the cameras, DSSL Group installed a Honeywell Galaxy 62-zone intruder alarm system which feeds back to a central monitoring station and is also integrated with the VMS. Dahua CCTV system installed Cllr Richard Lewis, Hillingdon Council’s Cabinet Member for Cultural Services, Culture and Heritage, said “The Battle of Britain Bunker is one of Hillingdon’s treasured heritage sites. It played a pivotal role in the Second World War, and it’s important that we keep it protected. Dahua CCTV system will help us to do that with their state-of-the-art system and high performing cameras.”

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