Coaxial Control Equipped Additions To Hanwha Techwin America H.264 SRD Series Of DVRs
Coaxial Control Equipped Additions To Hanwha Techwin America H.264 SRD Series Of DVRs

Samsung has added four new models to its SRD series of H.264 DVRs which are equipped with both Pelco Coaxitron and Samsung SSVC coaxial control protocols to provide users with full control of camera functions, as well as access to set-up menus via a digital video recorder, from the convenience of a control room.Coaxial control offers convenience as well as cost savings, allowing both video and telemetry control to be transmitted via conventional analog coaxial cabling. As well as a reduction in cabling costs, there is also the opportunity for existing equipment to be upgraded quickly and easily. The SRD-850DC and SRD-1650DC are eight and sixteen channel DVRs which can simultaneously record real-time CIF images across all channels and selectable channels up to 4CIF, whilst the SRD-870DC and the SRD-1670DC can simultaneously record real-time images across all channels at 4CIF.As a result of the introduction of these four new models, there are now twenty network friendly DVRs in the SRD series, all of which capitalize on Samsung's high level H.264 compression to ensure superb picture quality, whilst minimizing hard drive space and bandwidth requirements. The SRD series provides customers with the choice of four-, eight- and sixteen-channel DVRs which are available with or without built-in DVD drives. All twenty models feature Virtual Progressive Scan (VPS) which eliminates the problem of blurred edges on moving objects to provide picture-perfect still frames and selected models come complete with an HDMI output able to upscale images to 1080P. Additional installer and operator friendly features include a fully removable back panel so that hard drives can be swapped and upgraded without having to unplug all the cables and a multiple language on screen display. Data from ATM, POS or access control devices can be captured with the text data saved along with associated images to be played back if required at a later date. Dual codec operation delivers different streams for both high performance recording and optimized transmission, whilst a built-in web-server allows live and playback viewing options with the ability to back up incidents via a web browser. For advanced network operation, SRD series DVRs are all fully compatibility with Samsung's Centralised Management Software (CMS) which provides enhanced functionality as part of a complete integrated security system. They also share the same intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI) menu structure to make it easy for operators, for example, to set up each channel to record at different frames rates or resolutions. Available from all Samsung distributors, the SRD series of DVRs is offered with full support services from Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd, including free system design, free technical support and a full three-year warranty. 

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Digital video recorders (DVRs) - Expert commentary

Physical Security And The Cloud: Why One Can’t Work Without The Other
Physical Security And The Cloud: Why One Can’t Work Without The Other

Human beings have a long-standing relationship with privacy and security. For centuries, we’ve locked our doors, held close our most precious possessions, and been wary of the threats posed by thieves. As time has gone on, our relationship with security has become more complicated as we’ve now got much more to be protective of. As technological advancements in security have got smarter and stronger, so have those looking to compromise it. Cybersecurity Cybersecurity, however, is still incredibly new to humans when we look at the long relationship that we have with security in general. As much as we understand the basics, such as keeping our passwords secure and storing data in safe places, our understanding of cybersecurity as a whole is complicated and so is our understanding of the threats that it protects against. However, the relationship between physical security and cybersecurity is often interlinked. Business leaders may find themselves weighing up the different risks to the physical security of their business. As a result, they implement CCTV into the office space, and alarms are placed on doors to help repel intruders. Importance of cybersecurity But what happens when the data that is collected from such security devices is also at risk of being stolen, and you don’t have to break through the front door of an office to get it? The answer is that your physical security can lose its power to keep your business safe if your cybersecurity is weak. As a result, cybersecurity is incredibly important to empower your physical security. We’ve seen the risks posed by cybersecurity hacks in recent news. Video security company Verkada recently suffered a security breach as malicious attackers obtained access to the contents of many of its live camera feeds, and a recent report by the UK government says two in five UK firms experienced cyberattacks in 2020. Cloud computing – The solution Cloud stores information in data centres located anywhere in the world, and is maintained by a third party Cloud computing offers a solution. The cloud stores your information in data centres located anywhere in the world and is maintained by a third party, such as Claranet. As the data sits on hosted servers, it’s easily accessible while not being at risk of being stolen through your physical device. Here’s why cloud computing can help to ensure that your physical security and the data it holds aren’t compromised. Cloud anxiety It’s completely normal to speculate whether your data is safe when it’s stored within a cloud infrastructure. As we are effectively outsourcing our security by storing our important files on servers we have no control over - and, in some cases, limited understanding of - it’s natural to worry about how vulnerable this is to cyber-attacks. The reality is, the data that you save on the cloud is likely to be a lot safer than that which you store on your device. Cyber hackers can try and trick you into clicking on links that deploy malware or pose as a help desk trying to fix your machine. As a result, they can access your device and if this is where you’re storing important security data, then it is vulnerable. Cloud service providers Cloud service providers offer security that is a lot stronger than the software in the personal computer Cloud service providers offer security that is a lot stronger than the software that is likely in place on your personal computer. Hyperscalers such as Microsoft and Amazon Web Service (AWS) are able to hire countless more security experts than any individual company - save the corporate behemoth - could afford. These major platform owners have culpability for thousands of customers on their cloud and are constantly working to enhance the security of their platforms. The security provided by cloud service providers such as Claranet is an extension of these capabilities. Cloud resistance Cloud servers are located in remote locations that workers don’t have access to. They are also encrypted, which is the process of converting information or data into code to prevent unauthorized access. Additionally, cloud infrastructure providers like ourselves look to regularly update your security to protect against viruses and malware, leaving you free to get on with your work without any niggling worries about your data being at risk from hackers. Data centres Cloud providers provide sophisticated security measures and solutions in the form of firewalls and AI Additionally, cloud providers are also able to provide sophisticated security measures and solutions in the form of firewalls and artificial intelligence, as well as data redundancy, where the same piece of data is held within several separate data centres. This is effectively super-strong backup and recovery, meaning that if a server goes down, you can access your files from a backup server. Empowering physical security with cybersecurity By storing the data gathered by your physical security in the cloud, you're not just significantly reducing the risk of cyber-attacks, but also protecting it from physical threats such as damage in the event of a fire or flood. Rather than viewing your physical and cybersecurity as two different entities, treat them as part of one system: if one is compromised, the other is also at risk. They should work in tandem to keep your whole organization secure.

The Intrinsic Role Of Lighting For Video Surveillance Clarity And Performance
The Intrinsic Role Of Lighting For Video Surveillance Clarity And Performance

The sound of sirens in the distance is commonplace, nowadays. Whether related to a medical emergency or everyday crimes, such as theft, property crimes, and so on, we’re all accustomed to hearing these sirens by now. It is worth noting that many incidents that police respond to take place at night. According to a recent report by the Sleep Judge, more than half of murders, manslaughter, sexual assaults, robberies, aggravated assaults and motor vehicle thefts happen long after the sun has set. To anyone looking to address the round-the-clock security challenge, deploying the most comprehensive surveillance solution is a must, and this means, looking at the instrumental role illumination plays in video capture. Limitations of Traditional Video Surveillance If surveillance cameras can’t be used to prevent, detect and/or resolve crimes that occur in these areas, the entire security operation is obsolete For surveillance cameras relying on video analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver functionalities such as facial recognition, license plate reading and motion detection, nighttime crimes can pose something of a problem. Without adequate illumination, images from video cameras are grainy and unusable. Without proper lighting, potential criminals and moving objects essentially become indistinguishable, at night, thereby inhibiting even the most advanced security technologies. This limitation of traditional surveillance technology not only hinders immediate police response, but it also stops crime investigations dead in their tracks. Often, without video evidence that is clear and discernible, conviction in a court of law is next to impossible. A common response to this issue is to place security cameras near streetlights or well-lit areas. After all, according to NPR, street lights are effective in deterring crime,  as “there are people — neighbors, pedestrians or police — to actually see suspicious activity.” However, even if streetside and primary entrances are well lit, the areas that still need most to be surveilled are rear or side doorways shrouded by darkness, unlit back alleys, and so on. If surveillance cameras can’t be used to prevent, detect and resolve crimes that occur in these areas, the entire security operation is obsolete. Best-in-class security solutions must be able to see everything, day and night. A Purpose-Designed Solution to the Problem Addressing this issue is easier than you might think. Much like a human eye needs some sort of light to “see,” so does video surveillance technology. Integrating external illuminators into a security solution can optimize camera performance exponentially, expanding a camera’s video capture and coverage abilities and ensuring the operation of video analytics, day and night. Opting for an external illuminator allows system integrators to select a device that matches the exact emission range of a camera’s field of view (FOV). The result is an evenly lit visual field, where captured images are clear and effective for security purposes. The two most common options available to integrators include infrared (IR) and white light illuminators. Each technology is built to optimize particular deployments, depending on their needs. Infrared Versus White Light IR illuminators emit IR light, which is invisible to the human eye and perfect for covert surveillance operations. When cameras need to be able to detect potential threats over long distances, IR illuminators are perfect for the job as they typically have longer emission ranges. IR illuminators are optimal for surveillance operations in license plate recognition, border patrol, safe cities, theme park, and medical sleep lab applications. If an end user needs to implement full-color video analytics for identification purposes, such as facial, object and license plate recognition, white light illuminators are undoubtedly an integrator’s best bet. IR illumination and traditional thermal security cameras, after all, are only able to provide black-and-white images, whereas object recognition software often identifies objects based on their color. White light illuminators installed alongside AI-powered surveillance cameras enable enhanced video image clarity, which, optimizes video analytics performance. When customers want to physically deter suspicious activity, deploying white light illuminators is effective. A recent study out of Crime Labs New York found that businesses that deployed visible lights to deter crime “experienced crime rates that were significantly lower,” which “led to a 36 percent reduction in ‘index crimes’”. On top of all this, LED based white lights operate at low running costs and typically have long lifespans, saving end users thousands of dollars a year in energy costs without having to sacrifice surveillance optimization. External Versus Built-In Illumination Security customers looking to use lighting to deter crime and improve the performance of video surveillance may consider “all-in-one" solutions, as some cameras have LEDs (light emitting diodes) built into them. These LEDs typically encircle the lens and therefore shed light in whatever direction the camera is pointed. However convenient these may seem, built-in illumination can cause problems.Cameras deployed without proper illumination are rendered blind, especially at night First, LEDs built into cameras and next to other electronic components often cause heat to build up, which attracts insects that can trigger motion detection and obstruct a camera’s view. This heat buildup also shortens the LED lights lifespan. Built-in LEDs also tend to create “hot spots” with glare and reflection back into the camera, often because these lights only cover a 30-degree field of view (FOV), even though the average camera’s FOV is 90 degrees. This issue can severely limit a camera’s visibility, essentially rendering those remaining 60 degrees dark and unusable. All in all, when integrating lighting solutions into your security deployment, a cost-effective solution that enhances a camera’s video capture and coverage abilities, are external illuminators because they offer flexible choices of field of view and distances. Best-in-Class Solution When it comes to criminal conviction in a court of law, “seeing really is believing.” Cameras deployed without proper illumination are rendered blind, especially at night, just as any security officer would be when patrolling the same unlit area. To guarantee end users the most reliable and highest performing security solution, consider integrating best-in-class illumination into your offerings.

ONVIF Profile T And H.265: The Evolution Of Video Compression
ONVIF Profile T And H.265: The Evolution Of Video Compression

In today’s market, efficient use of bandwidth and storage is an essential part of maintaining an effective video surveillance system. A video management system’s ability to provide analysis, real time event notifications and crucial image detail is only as a good as the speed and bandwidth of a surveillance network. In the physical security industry, H.264 is the video compression format used by most companies. Some companies also employ H.264 enhancements to compress areas of an image that are irrelevant to the user at a higher ratio within a video stream in order to preserve image quality for more important details like faces, license plates or buildings. The H.265, H.264’s successor, will be increasingly used for compression in the future. Some companies are already using H.265 in their cameras and video management systems, while a host of other manufacturers are certainly preparing for its broader adoption in the years to come. Video Compression Technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies. In some cases, H.265 can double the data compression ratio of H.264, while retaining the same quality. Increased compression rate translates into decreased storage requirements on hard drives, less bandwidth usage and fewer switches – all of which reduce overall costs of system ownership. H.265 compression delivers a lower bitrate than H.264, which is relevant to end users and integrators because the lower bitrate reduces strain on hardware and can reduce playback issues. It’s very important that the compression format that is used is supported in all of the different components of a system: cameras, desktop computers on which the VMS is running and the VMS itself. It is also good for end users and integrators to understand the basics of video compression. Having a basic understanding of compression allows users to tweak settings to reduce bandwidth usage even more. Many cameras come with default settings that can be changed to ultimately reduce costs. ONVIF Physical Security In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 but is not directly involved in developing the compression standards themselves. With Profile T, the new ONVIF video profile released will employ a new media service that is compression agnostic. This means that it can support new video compression formats, including H.265, as well as new audio compression formats, with the ability to include new video and audio codecs as needed in the future without having to redesign its media service. In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 Standardization organizations that are directly addressing new compression standards include the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) and a joint commission of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which is addressing the coding of audio, picture, multimedia and hypermedia information. Other compression formats on par with H.264 and H.265 are being developed by companies such as Google. H.265 Compression Formats Using products that employ H.265 compression will reduce costs through bandwidth reduction, as will changing default settings on cameras, which are often conservative. Having a basic understanding of compression formats and how to tweak camera factory default settings also gives integrators the ability to further reduce bandwidth for added costs savings and increased system performance. These enhancements will analyse which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly It is also worth noting that H.265 enhancements will likely be developed by camera manufacturers to further reduce bandwidth, as was the case with H.264. These enhancements will analyze which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly. While H.265 itself is ready for prime time, its value as a tool for IP-based surveillance systems is dependent on support for the codec in all parts of the system – the VMS, server hardware, graphics cards and camera. Though widespread H.265 adoption is predicted, providers of these components are jumping on the H.265 bandwagon at different rates of speed. ONVIF is including support for H.265 in its new video profile, Profile T, because it believes it will become the most widely used compression format and ONVIF recognizes the need to anticipate that migration as a future need of the industry. The new media service, which will be implemented with Profile T, will be future-proof in that when new compression formats are released in the future, ONVIF can adopt them very quickly. That flexibility will definitely help integrators.

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The Gaylord Opryland Resort And Convention Center Upgrades Their Video Surveillance System With Cameras From Hanwha Techwin
The Gaylord Opryland Resort And Convention Center Upgrades Their Video Surveillance System With Cameras From Hanwha Techwin

Marriott International Inc. is a hospitality company and the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center is a Marriott property in the world. Located in Nashville, Tennessee, Gaylord Opryland offers visitors the chance to experience Music City under a single roof. The resort has a hotel with over 3000 suites and rooms and a smaller adjacent hotel with more than 300. Risk assessment Ryman Hospitality, the organization that owns Gaylord Brand Hotels, decided to embark on a risk assessment of their properties in 2017. The third-party assessors discovered that CCTV systems were lacking in all of the hotels, including at the Gaylord Opryland Resort. According to Greg Pezzo, Gaylord Opryland Resort and Attractions’ Safety and Security Director, “The system consisted of old operating systems and cameras that didn’t all work. The security team could not get consistent playback from all of their cameras, and they were not able to store data for more than a few weeks at a time.” As a result of the risk assessment, ownership decided to invest in a complete upgrade of all its hotels and chose the Gaylord Opryland as its test case. Their strategy was to use Opryland as the model and then upgrade their other five Gaylord hotels following its success. Installation of multidirectional cameras Working with integrator Herring Technology, Ryman Hospitality designed a solution that features a new video management system (VMS) from Milestone Systems and 400 state-of-the-art cameras from Hanwha Techwin. The Resort purchased a variety of Hanwha cameras, including 145 XND-6010 full HD cameras with video analytics, 182 Q series indoor and outdoor dome cameras with IR, and more than 20 PNM 7000 and 9000 multi-directional cameras. Deciding where to place their cameras was a relatively simple process. Pezzo explains, “We added cameras where we had high volume, where we had experienced problems in the past, and where we didn’t previously have cameras at all.” They also looked at their own data relating to theft and other incidents to help determine camera location. High-quality imaging camera The surveillance system and the cameras are helping to protect the resort against liability from potential lawsuits According to Pezzo, one of the main functions of their upgraded system is protecting the resort against false claims. He states, “From a claims perspective, this surveillance system and, specifically, these cameras are helping to protect us against liability from potential lawsuits.” He explains, “Our older security camera images are grainy or black and white, which means we could not get the level of detail we needed. But, with Hanwha cameras, we are able to capture high-quality images in real-time that show us, for example, how a guest fell: whether there was an obstruction, water on the floor, an indentation, or whether the guest simply tripped.” The ability to protect the organization against potential lawsuits equates to significant ROI for the Resort. Easy to keep track of movement As a result of the upgrade, security is easily able to track persons of interest clearly as they move throughout the resort. Says Pezzo, “With 3000 rooms and a million square feet of property, the ability to see an individual this clearly as they move through our spaces is incredible. In the past, we would lose people in uncovered sections. They would just disappear. But that doesn’t happen anymore.” For the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, the upgrade had an immediate impact. According to Pezzo, “On the first day after installing the new cameras, someone attempted a false claim, but we were easily able to prove that it was not our fault.” For 2021, the Resort plans to invest in more new cameras every few months as the budget becomes available.

What New Technologies And Trends Will Shape Video Analytics?
What New Technologies And Trends Will Shape Video Analytics?

The topic of video analytics has been talked and written about for decades, and yet is still one of the cutting-edge themes in the physical security industry. Some say yesterday’s analytics systems tended to overpromise and underdeliver, and there are still some skeptics. However, newer technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) are reinvigorating the sector and enabling it to finally live up to its promise. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: What new technologies and trends will shape video analytics in 2021?

Hanwha Techwin Announces The Immediate Availability Of A New Range of Public View Monitors (PVMs) With Built-in Cameras
Hanwha Techwin Announces The Immediate Availability Of A New Range of Public View Monitors (PVMs) With Built-in Cameras

Hanwha Techwin, a global supplier of IP and analog video surveillance solutions, has announced the immediate availability of a new range of easy to install and affordable Public View Monitors (PVMs) designed to help retailers deter crime. Wisenet PVMs The new Wisenet PVMs offer a complete built-in SSL-connected 2-megapixel camera, eliminating the need for system integrators to install and connect a separate supporting camera. With a choice of 10”, 27”, and 32” (inches) monitors, the three new PVMs can be easily placed at store entrances, shopping aisles, cash registers, or self-service checkouts. Public view monitors can serve as a strong deterrent to illicit behavior" “Public view monitors can serve as a strong deterrent to illicit behavior,” said Ray Cooke, Senior Vice President, Products, Solutions, and Integration, Hanwha Techwin America, adding “Our new line of PVMs has been designed for ease of installation so they can be quickly deployed across a large number of stores.” Supported by Wisenet WAVE VMS and NVRs Aside from deterring crime, the new PVMs can also display other important information, such as customized on-screen messaging to indicate a recording is in progress, as well as supplier commercials, own-brand product promotions, and special offers, by making use of the monitors’ SD/SDHC/SDXC slot, which can facilitate up to 256GB of data storage capacity. Supported by the Wisenet WAVE video management platform (Wisenet WAVE VMS), as well as Wisenet NVRs (Network Video Recorders), the ONVIF-conformant Public View Monitors can be programmed so that images captured by the cameras are either continuously recorded or when prompted to do so, by built-in face or motion detection video analytics. Face and motion detection activation The face and motion detection feature can also be configured to switch the display to ‘live’ view to make people aware they are being watched, as they will be able to see themselves on the monitor as they enter a store or walk down a shopping aisle. The display reverts to the slide show after a specified number of seconds. The PVMs can be integrated with tagging (EAS) systems to record images of people, who might be leaving the store with stolen items. Video evidence Public View Monitors will continuously stream images to a control room, where they can be viewed via VMS Regardless of whether they are displaying live images or a slide show, or the monitor has been turned off by someone using a remote control, the Public View Monitors will continuously stream images to a control room, where they can be viewed via video management software (VMS), as well as continue to be recorded on an on-site or remotely located NVR. The ultra-low light capabilities of the new PVMs, together with Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) technology performing at up to 150dB, enables the built-in camera to capture clear and sharp images in strongly contrasting light conditions, at store entrances, for example, where strong sunlight may be streaming in. Power over Ethernet (PoE+) All three Public View Monitors (PVMs) can be powered by 12V DC power supply, with the Wisenet SMT-1030PV also offering the option to utilize Power over Ethernet (PoE+), if there isn’t an existing power supply close to where the Public View Monitor is being installed. A single cable of up to 325 feet is all that is needed to provide power to the SMT-1030PV and for network communications. The three new Wisenet PVMs, which can be mounted by using standard VESA brackets, are as follows: SMT-1030PV: 10” monitor with LED backlight and 1024 x 600 display resolution. SMT-2730PV: 27” monitor with LED backlight, HDMI input, and Full HD display. SMT-3230PV: 32” monitor with LED backlight, HDMI input, and Full HD display.

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