Delta’s New Electrically Controlled Barrier Receives P1 Rating at ASTM M50 Test Level
Delta’s New Electrically Controlled Barrier Receives P1 Rating at ASTM M50 Test Level

Delta Scientific’s latest HD 300 barrier, is available with either a fully electric or hydraulic control unit, and will stop a 15,000 pound (66.7 Km) vehicle traveling 50 mph (80 kpm). Upon impact, the barrier remains in its foundation and the opening stays blocked, providing a multiple hit capability. In its M50 crash test, the HD300 completely disabled the test vehicle, causing severe damage to the occupant department and power train. The maximum penetration recorded was an outstanding -1.8 m on the passenger’s side. The P1 penetration rating was given because the penetration beyond the protected side of the barrier was less than 1.0 m at the lower leading edge of the test vehicle’s cargo bed. “The HD300 provides many of the flexibilities that security professionals want in a vehicle access barrier,” explains Greg Hamm, Delta Scientific vice president, marketing and sales. “Besides being easy to install and providing a fast emergency fast operation, low maintenance and multiple hit capabilities, customers can select either our new all electric control unit or Delta’s lauded hydraulic control unit.”With its 24-inch (61 cm) shallow foundation and aesthetic design, the HD300 obviates the concerns of interference with buried pipes, power lines and fiber optic communication lines. The shallow foundation also reduces installation complexity, time, materials and corresponding costs. The HD300 is perfect for high water table locations and areas with corrosive soils. It provides low maintenance as all components are accessible from the sides or top of the barrier.For increased security, the HD300 leverages Delta’s propriety counter-balanced technology to provide a 1.5 second emergency fast operation (EFO), responding to attacks very quickly. The electric actuator provides IP67 protection, meaning that the unit is totally protected against dust and as well as the effect of immersion between 15 cm and 1 m. “The HD300 provides many of the flexibilities that security professionals want in a vehicle access barrier,” explains Greg Hamm, Delta Scientific vice president, marketing and sales. “Besides being easy to install and providing a fast emergency fast operation, low maintenance and multiple hit capabilities, customers can select either our new all electric control unit or Delta’s lauded hydraulic control unit.”With its 24-inch (61 cm) shallow foundation and aesthetic design, the HD300 obviates the concerns of interference with buried pipes, power lines and fiber optic communication lines. The shallow foundation also reduces installation complexity, time, materials and corresponding costs. The HD300 is perfect for high water table locations and areas with corrosive soils. It provides low maintenance as all components are accessible from the sides or top of the barrier.For increased security, the HD300 leverages Delta’s propriety counter-balanced technology to provide a 1.5 second emergency fast operation (EFO), responding to attacks very quickly. The electric actuator provides IP67 protection, meaning that the unit is totally protected against dust and as well as the effect of immersion between 15 cm and 1 m.

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Delta Scientific HD200 Vehicle Barrier For High Traffic Locations
Delta Scientific HD200 Vehicle Barrier For High Traffic Locations

The fastest operating standard vehicle barrier in the market, the HD200 features a crash rating of ASTM M30/P1, bringing to a full stop a 7.5 ton (6803.9 kg) medium duty truck traveling 30 mph (48.3 kph) in less than 3.3 feet (1 m). Truck rebound is 11.5 feet (3.5 m).Final Denial Applications Built for high traffic, heavily populated locations requiring rapid emergency fast operation (EFO) rates and open/close cycles, in high traffic locations, the barrier is open much of the time, letting vehicles through. Therefore, when the location is heavily populated, the barrier must open and close frequently. More importantly, the barrier must be able to close quickly. To negate vehicles being used as weapons, the HD200 barrier will stop and destroy a vehicle moving at 30 mph (48.3 kph). This allows users to install this barrier in final denial applications with as little as 50 feet (15.2m) of stand-off distance and still stop vehicles moving up to 44 feet (13.4 m) per second. Increased Safety Against Terrorists Using Vehicles As WeaponsAs the tragedy in Nice, France, has warned, security professionals need to be aware of vehicle attacks on people. For heavy traffic in densely populated locations, not only must the vehicle barrier be fast but it must be rugged and easy to install.The HD200 provides the features needed in a vehicle access barrier. Besides being easy to install and providing a quick emergency fast operation and low maintenance, customers can select either Delta's new all electric control unit or Delta’s lauded hydraulic control unit. With either, the HD200 barrier will stop a 7.5 ton (6803.9 kg) medium duty truck travelling 30 mph (48.3 kph) in less than 3.3 feet (1 m).With a 24-inch (61 cm) shallow foundation and fully enclosed, flush mount design, the HD200 obviates the concerns of interference with buried pipes, power lines and fiber optic communication lines in urban applications. The shallow foundation also reduces installation complexity, time, materials and corresponding costs. The HD200 is perfect for high water table locations and areas with corrosive soils. It provides low maintenance as its totally enclosed face is easily removed for access.Remotely Controlled EFO Leveraging the latest technologies, the HD200’s breakthrough EFO can be remotely controlled via fiber optics, touch screen control panels, NEMA rated control button panels and simple key switches.The HD200 barrier also features a full range of diagnostic indicators for early detection of any difficulties.As with most other Delta barricades and barriers that are properly maintained, projected life expectancy of the HD200 is 20+ years.

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Barricades - Expert commentary

Importance Of Establishing Security Standards For K12 Schools
Importance Of Establishing Security Standards For K12 Schools

As we approach National Safe Schools Week (October 21-27), it is appropriate for a conversation to begin regarding establishing standards for K12 school security. Currently no standards exist for assisting schools navigate the complexity of understanding what they need, how much it will cost and how they will secure their learning environments. Security Industry Experts The Partner Alliance for Safer Schools (PASS) is one of the organizations at the forefront of establishing security standards for schools. In 2014, the Security Industry Association (SIA) and the National Systems Contractors Association (NSCA) formed PASS, which brought together a cross functional group of members including school officials, safe schools’ consultants, law enforcement and security industry experts to collaborate and develop a coordinated approach to protecting K-12 students and staff. School administrators are often contacted repeatedly by organizations with multiple safety and security products PASS has provided valuable insights regarding an ‘All Hazards’ approach to school safety and security. In fact, PASS suggests that school administrators are challenged with two decisions: Determining what they need to do How to prioritize Safe School Environment School administrators are experts in running schools and providing education. However, most are not security experts and do not understand the complexity of implementing a comprehensive physical security and safety program across their districts. Still, they are often contacted repeatedly by organizations with multiple safety and security products. School administrators are experts in running schools and providing education, but most are not security experts  Some of these organizations recognize their products are just pieces of a safe school environment puzzle and how they fit in, whereas others focus on specific applications and do not understand how their specific solutions may affect life safety codes and Americans with Disabilities Act law. (Note: Many ‘barricade devices’ fall into this latter category and actually introduce liability concerns with the unintended consequences of their use.)Schools incorporate evacuation drills as part of their emergency preparedness plans and practice on a regular basis Even for experts, the plethora of options and disparate systems required to integrate a safety and security approach at schools is daunting. The ongoing challenge is integrating access control, video, mass notification, and/or visitor management products into a single, effective, and appropriate system the owner can understand, utilize, and afford and that meet local codes and ADA laws. In the absence of standards, schools are likely to amass a collection of devices that do not constitute a comprehensive solution. Lack Of Consensus In years past, the our industry and commercial buildings adhered to legacy codes – like Building Officials and Code Administrators International Inc. (BOCA), Uniform Building Code (UBC), Southern Building Code Congress International Inc. (SBBCI), and International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) – which have traditionally been revised every three years, while local jurisdictions decided what versions to adopt and enforce. Currently, however, there is a move toward the International Building Code (IBC), which is published by the International Code Council (ICC) and includes standards and guidance for commercial buildings on doors, windows, and other openings. A risk assessment is the next step toward developing a comprehensive security plan, and begins with developing a trend analysis Still, despite this migration of codes from a patchwork of local decisions to global guidelines, there remains a lack of consensus around school security. The current fragmented approach causes confusion regarding how new schools are designed and how to retrofit existing school buildings, whose average age is 45+ years. Right Protection Equipment One can point to the fact that there hasn’t been one student lost in a school fire in over 50 years as testament to standards like NFPA 80 and NFPA 101 being referenced in model building codes. Additionally, schools incorporate evacuation drills as part of their emergency preparedness plans and practice on a regular basis. It’s not just having the right protection equipment in the building, it’s also having a procedural layer in place to make sure everyone knows their roles and responsibilities in the event of fire. The stress of the actual event can limit ones’ ability to think clearly. Practice makes perfect. Why would we approach school security any differently? School security is a team effort, and it is important to understand all the areas security impacts and involves School security is a team effort. It is important to understand all the areas security impacts and involves. PASS suggests starting with a basic team consisting of: Security Director Local Law Enforcement School Administrator Integrator Door and Hardware Consultant IT Director Comprehensive Security Plan Quantifying and mitigating risk are the jobs of security professionals and school administratorsA risk assessment is the next step toward developing a comprehensive security plan. This often begins with conducting a trend analysis requiring the collection of data from a variety of public and private sources. The challenge is to pull these pieces into a usable and easily understood format that provides a guide for current and future risk concerns. Risk assessment and mitigation can never eliminate risk. Quantifying and mitigating risk are the jobs of security professionals and school administrators. Data from the following sources can help measure risk: Campus: Review incident report trends for at least the past 36 months. Area and city: Review crime data from local law enforcement for the surrounding neighborhood and city. Screening procedures: How is hiring conducted? Anonymous tip reporting systems: Enabling students, staff members, parents and the community to anonymously alert administrators to perceived and actual threats. Social media monitoring: such monitoring can provide important information that can be used to identify risks. Monitoring social media could help measure risk for school safety Delay Adversarial Behaviors These assessments can then be incorporated into the best practice approach of Layered Security. Layered security combines best practice components within each layer that effectively deter, detect and delay adversarial behaviors. Layered security works from the outside in. As one layer is bypassed, another layer provides an additional level of protection. The asset being protected is at the center of the layers – students, staff and authorized visitors. PASS defines five layers of Security:As one layer is bypassed, another layer provides an additional level of protection District Wide Property Perimeter Parking Lot Perimeter Building Perimeter Classroom/Interior Perimeter Appropriate Tier Target Each layer can be broken down into Tier levels with Tier 1 being basic and Tier 4 being the highest level of security. It is important to understand that the demographics of individual school buildings varies, even within the same district. Security experts will quickly point out that ‘if you’ve seen one school, you’ve seen one school’. The assessments will determine the appropriate Tier target. Figure 1 Each layer includes essential protective elements, or components, of security. Every layer does not necessarily include all seven of these common components, and a layer may include additional components unique to that particular layer. Safety And Security Components Policies & Procedures People (roles & training) Architectural Communication Access Control Video Surveillance Detection and Alarms Layered Security While components are not listed in a priority order, three components included in all layers are policies and procedures, the roles and training of people, and communication. These components often perform a function in every layer and every tier in each layer. Three tools come together in the PASS approach as outlined in the new 4th Edition of the PASS Guidelines (Figure 2) - the Layers are established and defined, a Checklist/Assessment breaks down each layer into tiered best practices which then tie into the guidelines where a narrative explains each best practice in more detail. Figure 2  Schools need not reinvent the wheel when it comes to school security planning. Following the best practices of Risk Assessments and Layered Security will ensure that every school building in a district will have a unique and comprehensive plan that is tailored to their individual needs.

How Atlanta’s New Mercedes-Benz Stadium Sets The Standard For Protection Against Vehicle Attacks
How Atlanta’s New Mercedes-Benz Stadium Sets The Standard For Protection Against Vehicle Attacks

Atlanta’s new $1.5 billion stadium, home to the NFL Atlanta Falcons football team and MLS Atlanta United soccer club and site of the recent NCAA national college football championship, is protecting fans, personnel and athletes from terrorists and errant drivers from using vehicles as weapons. While the threat of terrorists planning to attack soft targets, such as stadiums increases, stadium security professionals, such as those at the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium, must look for the weak points throughout their facilities to determine where fanatics are most likely assailing. Taking their cue from hard target attacks, they and other stadium management understand that the use of vehicles, either to carry the people that will carry out the attack or act as the bomb itself, is a very real threat. New System, Safer Pedestrians Installed by Tusco, using Delta Scientific perimeter protection products, the new access system includes four DSC501 barriers, five DSC720 bollards, 39 DSC2000 barriers and 59 DSC680 fixed bollards. “We are very experienced with installing Delta equipment,” relates Brent Martina, President of Tusco. “Mercedes-Benz Stadium was very particular about their security needs and protocols and requested a customized sequence of operations for their security equipment. While the threat of terrorists planning to attack soft targets increases, stadium security professionals must look for the weak points throughout their facilities “Delta Scientific’s products and experienced engineers made them the obvious choice in meeting both the high quality and technical standards required to integrate with the stadium’s sophisticated security system. It was crucial to have a reliable team in place as we received a very compressed schedule to get everything complete by the first football game and, therefore, had no room for errors.” Because of long, straight approaches to some access points, stadiums oftentimes need to deploy high performance barriers. DSC501 barriers were used at main entrances where players and VIPs, among others, enter with their cars. Preventing Attacks Before They Happen The DSC501 is the only K54-certified retractable vehicle barricade in the world. Set in a foundation only 18 inches deep, it will survive and operate after a 5.4-million-foot pound impact. That’s equivalent to a 65,000-pound truck hitting it at 50 mph. Stopping the truck or car dead in its tracks, the DSC501 protects against a “second hit” risk from a second vehicle. The stadium preferred installing these barricades in a more industrial look, wanting them to be “seen.” Five retractable DSC720 bollards were used at the pedestrian entry areas. This is Delta’s highest crash rated bollard, stopping a 15,000-pound vehicle at 50 mph. The bollard will stop and destroy much larger vehicles than those tested at very high velocities. The DSC720 is 35 inches tall and 15 inches wide. At Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the bollards feature brushed stainless-steel sleeves. Oftentimes, the ground below the access points are filled with cables, wires, pipes and other infrastructure products. As a result, typical, below ground installed traffic bollards, barriers and barricades cannot be used because these infrastructure products are too close to the surface. The solution is to use surface-mounted and shallow foundation barricades and barriers. This isn’t the only stadium using Delta equipment to protect staff and attendees from vehicle harm - Levi’s Stadium in San Francisco is a well-known user Delivery Entrances Are Weaknesses At the same time, for some reason, delivery entrances never seem to be as secured as the main entrances to the stadium. With delivery vehicles coming and going, delivery entrances need a solution that lets delivery vehicles enter and exit but stop unauthorized vehicles from entering at all. At the loading docks, 39 of Delta’s fastest, smallest and shallowest foundation barricades were implemented. Chosen especially for high speed applications and ease of installation, the cost effective DSC2000 barrier is K12 crash-certified with no penetration, meaning it will stop a 15,000-pound vehicle traveling 50 mph dead in its tracks. The ten-inch shallow foundation also reduces installation complexity, time, materials and corresponding costs. Lastly, 50 DSC680 shallow foundation fixed bollards with stainless steel sleeves protect pedestrian areas. They secure any unprotected locations where vehicle bombers and errant drivers have no obstacles. Versus cement barriers such as posts and pots, many organisations prefer fixed-post bollards for several reasons. Terrorists typically don't go where they see barricades, so placing them wherever possible attacks can happen reduces security risks dramatically That’s because, when hit, cement posts and pots can explode, literally spreading shrapnel throughout the crowd, potentially creating numerous injuries. Shallow foundation bollards can be installed within sidewalks or on top of concrete deck truss bridges as well as conform to the inclines and turns of a locale. They also meet the 1-meter clearance regulations mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The fixed bollard, which does not go up and down, provides a significant blocking device solution that continues to challenge security directors faced with threats such as stopping a vehicle from ploughing into the stadium’s inner perimeter. They let a facility manager meet a long-standing challenge - how to easily install bollards on shallow substrates, including those that are not level or have turns. No longer do locations, such as curves on hills, the upper levels of parking structures and other unprotected locales have to rely on unsightly ‘make-do’ solutions to stop car bombers or wayward drivers. One Of The World's Most Secure “Delayed by roof issues, the Mercedes-Benz Stadium challenged us with a condensed schedule to provide one of the world’s most secure vehicle access systems,” avows Martina. “I’m proud to say that our team completed the work on time and walked away from the project with another pleased client.” This isn’t the only stadium using Delta equipment to protect staff and attendees from vehicle harm. Among many, Penn State and Purdue as well as Levi’s Stadium in San Francisco (49ers) are well-known users. Unfortunately, most procurement offices won't allow vendors to announce their purchases. This is too bad since terrorists typically won't go where they know barricades are deployed, reducing security risks dramatically. Leading universities, including six of the Associated Press (AP) top-10 rated 2018 pre-season football schools, also stayed one step ahead of terrorists and errant drivers this year on their campuses by identifying vulnerable areas and securing them within minutes with Delta MP5000 temporary, portable barriers. These mobile deployable vehicle crash barriers carry a K8 rating (M40 ASTM rating), stopping 7.5-ton vehicles traveling 40 mph. Terrorists typically don't go where they see barricades, so placing them wherever possible attacks can happen reduces security risks dramatically. Today, there is little excuse for a major stadium to suffer an attack which uses a vehicle to break through the perimeter. Whatever the weakness a terrorist thinks can be exploited, there is a type of bollard, barricade or barrier to stop him, yet let authorized people through.

How Society And Politics Impacted The Security Industry In 2017
How Society And Politics Impacted The Security Industry In 2017

For the security industry, 2017 was a good year, but not a great year. With political changes coming and greater interest in border control, perimeter security and analytic technologies, we have seen an increase in enquiries from both federal, and state law enforcement agencies and municipalities. The Political Security Landscape The series of unexpected, natural and self-inflicted disasters that swept across the United States over the last few months have also created a greater interest in security and life safety. As a result, we have seen more security projects developing in cities and institutions such as education in the U.S. Another impact on our global business is the fluctuation of currency due to economic uncertainties.There is a high demand for security technologies that interoperate with other systems, to form integrated solutions Some countries have benefitted; however, most have the burden of reduced purchase power. Consequently, integrators have had to work harder to ensure projects abroad are fulfilled and completed with great sensitivity to any shifting economics of the security solutions. Interoperability Of Systems In 2018, we continue to see a high demand for security technologies that interoperate with other systems, to form one integrated solution. More federal funding will be allocated for domestic security projects, particularly for cities and critical infrastructure. Commercial and government applications will continue to seek proactive monitoring technologies embedded with artificial intelligence capabilities, and the companies that can provide these analytic technologies will be rewarded. Threat detection analytics, such as aggression detection and facial recognition, will see greater deployment across all verticals. Manufacturers will have to keep investing in their R&D to keep up with the greater demand for state-of-the-art – yet reliable – applied technology. In 2017, we responded to strong interest in audio-monitoring. More industry leaders spoke about the importance of audio in the overall security solution at seminars and conferences. Customers who haven’t thought of audio in the past are now seeking audio solutions for both traditional and non-traditional applications.