IAM From PCSC - Next Generation Integrated Alarm & Access Management System
IAM From PCSC - Next Generation Integrated Alarm & Access Management System

PCSC launched the first all-in-one system with 21 direct connect zones and automatic deactivation of zone groups by authorized cardholders, providing a system with virtually no false alarms on entry.  Benefiting from PCSC's 21 years of experience in access control, the iAM offers features and functions not available in comparable systems.  Service and user programming is accomplished with a self-loading, easy to use Windows based software application, LiNC-Ez.  Most parameters, such as cardholders, zone groups, time periods and holidays are factory defaulted – the only custom setting required is the central station phone number.  Utilizing PCSC's innovative high security 5 State Alarm Monitoring logic, the iAM provides the most accurate alarm monitoring for intrusion and access control devices. Additional system features include guard tour management - capable of recognizing a guard and notifying the central station when the special guard card is presented at a customer's site, but access will not be granted unless the system is in an alarm state.Alarm monitoring features include:  21 Alarm Zones, automatic alarm zone group deactivation by cardholder, automatic daylight savings control, automatic holiday control, 99 user definable zone groups, 99 user defined PIN (4 or 5 digits), supervised bell output, supervised enclosure tamper, contact ID central station communication, user defined zone names, user defined zone groups, user selectable zone state (supervised or non-supervised) and individual zone calibration control. 

Add to Compare

Access control systems & kits - Expert commentary

Demand Increases For Specialist IT Skills Among Security System Integrators
Demand Increases For Specialist IT Skills Among Security System Integrators

How can security system integrators not just survive but thrive in today’s IT-led market? The key seems to be in training. As increasingly more clients look to integrate access control with IT environments, they want integrators with the specialist skills to achieve this. For integrators that don’t invest in training, the risk is being left behind. Because many security system integrators aren’t providing specialist IT support, manufacturers are now offering services to make implementations and integrations easier. This isn’t a scalable or desirable option for many manufacturers though, they don’t want to become integrators. The result? Manufacturers will be pushed into developing products that can be integrated with IT networks off the shelf. And this isn’t necessarily the best option for end user, manufacturer or integrator. With a growing number of cloud-based security solutions, integrators also face the threat of clients opting for installation-only services. How security system integrators can survive and thrive today It’s not all doom and gloom for security system integrators though. To avoid becoming redundant, or being downgraded to simple access control installers, there’s lots you can do to strengthen your position. Listen carefully Many integrators are reluctant to do this, but it’s a great way to demonstrate the depth of your experience One of the first ways you can distinguish yourself from your competitors is by really listening to what your clients want and need. You can then translate this into a security or access control application tailored carefully to them. Many integrators are reluctant to do this, but it’s a great way to demonstrate the depth of your experience and product knowledge. It’s far superior to carrying out a standard implementation, which can leave clients feeling they’ve not been listened to or given good value. Up your IT knowledge TCP/IP has become the standard for communication between devices and central server applications in access control and security in general. So every technician now needs to know how to connect IP devices to networks and configure them in the central application. This is only the tip of the iceberg though, there’s so much more that integrators now need to be proficient in when it comes to IT. From understanding a client’s WAN, LAN and VPN networks to back-up systems, encryption technologies, key management and transparent communication. It’s also important to know how to integrate applications at server level, whether you’re integrating two or more security systems or a HR database. Most integrators have begun to invest in one or two IT experts, but this usually isn’t enough to meet clients’ needs. To really stay ahead, it’s crucial to invest more heavily in IT training and expertise. Choose your portfolio carefully When considering your portfolio, ensure you check the background of each product’s manufacturer Ideally, your portfolio should be small but rich, which is more difficult than it sounds. Choosing products that will scale easily is complex, and you need to consider the potential for increased functionality or connectivity as well as scalability. When considering your portfolio, make sure you check the background and outlook of each product’s manufacturer. You don’t want to select items that are likely to be discontinued in the near future, which can often happen after a manufacturer is acquired, for example. Get in the cloud In the security market, the mid and low segments are already shifting to cloud-based solutions that need neither integration nor IT skills. This leaves you with opportunities for just installation and maintenance services, where profit opportunities are reduced. An alternative is to begin selling cloud-based security services yourself to help you attract and retain clients for the long-term. Give clients added commercial value As competition increases and budgets shrink, offering added value, to new and existing clients, is a vital way to differentiate your business. This will help you to not just defend against competitors but to grow your business and increase your profitability. Configuring access control reports for clients is just one example. It’s relatively straightforward to do but provides really valuable insight into visitor flow. This can then enable them to, for example, staff reception adequately and provide sufficient catering, which all improves the experience for visitors and employees. Providing this kind of consultative service, instantly pushes you up the value chain. Stay agile and well informed To survive and grow as a security system integrator today, the upshot is that it’s crucial to keep pace with the market’s ever-changing trends, technology and client needs. And, to make sure you’re ready to adapt and give clients the services they want, it’s vital to give your people the in-depth training they need.

Blending Physical Security With Convenience Is No Simple Task
Blending Physical Security With Convenience Is No Simple Task

Back in the 1960s a lead engineer working in conjunction with the United States Navy for Lockheed’s Skunk Works team coined the acronym KISS, which translated to the design principle ‘keep it simple stupid’.  The KISS principle embraces the concept of simplicity, stating that most systems work best if they are kept simple rather than geared up to be more complicated. When it comes to physical security systems, this concept can also play a key element in its overall success. Secure work environments For years the tug of war in the security industry has pitted the need for a secure environment against the desire for technology that is convenient for users. However, finding a happy medium between the two has often seemed elusive. I believe you can design and have operational convenience at the same time as achieving high security" Jeff Spivey, a security consultant and the CEO of Security Risk Management, has this to say about it, “If there is an understanding of the security-related risks and their separate and/or collective impact on the organization’s bottom line business goals, a resolution can be reached.” Jeff also does not think that convenience and high security have to be opposing each other. He says, “I believe you can design and have operational convenience at the same time as achieving high security.” Importance of secure access control The premise is that for organizations and spaces to be truly secure, they must be difficult to access. So, by its very nature, access control is designed to be restrictive, allowing only authorized staff and visitors to access a facility or other secured areas inside. This immediately puts convenience at odds with security. Most people will tolerate the restrictive nature of a controlled entrance using badge, card or biometric because they understand the need for security. When that technology gets in the way of staff traversing freely throughout the facility during the course of a business day, or hindering potential visitors or vendors from a positive experience entering the building, they become less tolerant, which often leads to negative feedback to the security staff. Enhancing corporate security Security consultants like Spivey and security directors all stress that understanding the threats and risk levels of an organization will most likely dictate its physical security infrastructure and approach. All the technology in the world is useless if it is not embraced by those who are expected to use it and it doesn’t fit the culture of the organization. Once employees and customers are educated about what security really is, they understand that they're not losing convenience, they're gaining freedom to move safely from point A to point B. Converged data and information shape new access options Migration of physical access control systems to a more network-centric platform is a game-changer for security technologies The migration of physical access control systems to a more network-centric platform has been a game-changer for emerging security technology options. The expansion of the Internet of Things (IoT), Near-Field Communication devices powered by Bluetooth technology, and the explosion of converged information systems and identity management tools that are now driving access control are making it easier than ever before for employees and visitors to apply for clearance, permissions and credentials. Wireless and proximity readers Advancements in high-performance wireless and proximity readers have enhanced the user’s access experience when presenting credentials at an entry and expediting movement throughout a facility. A user is now able to access a secured office from street-level without ever touching a key or card. Using a Bluetooth-enabled smartphone or triggering a facial recognition technology, they enter the building through a security revolving door or turnstile. A total building automation approach adds extra convenience, as well as seamless security, when access technology is integrated into other systems like elevator controls. A total building automation approach adds extra convenience and seamless security How to Meet Security Concerns at the Entry While security managers are charged with providing their facilities the maximum level of security possible, there is always the human element to consider. But does the effort to make people comfortable with their security system ecosystem come at a cost? Does all this convenience and the drive to deliver a positive security experience reduce an organization’s overall levels of security? And if so, how can we continue to deliver the same positive experience including speed of entry – while improving risk mitigation and threat prevention? Door entrances, barriers Users can slip through the door or turnstile barriers while they are still open after a credentialed individual has gone through Let’s examine some of the various types of entrances being used at most facilities and the security properties of each. With some entrance types, there is the possibility for security to fall short of its intended goals in a way that can’t be addressed by access control technology alone. In particular, with many types of doors and barriers, tailgating is possible: users can slip through the door or turnstile barriers while they are still open after a credentialed individual has gone through. To address this, many organizations hire security officers to supervise the entry. While this can help to reduce tailgating, it has been demonstrated that officers are not immune to social engineering and can often be “talked into” letting an unauthorized person into a facility. Deploying video cameras, sensors Some organizations have deployed video surveillance cameras or sensors to help identify tailgaters after the fact or a door left open for longer than rules allow. This approach is not uncommon where facilities have attempted to optimize throughput and maintain a positive experience for staff and visitors. Security staff monitoring the video feeds can alert management so that action can be taken – but this is at best a reactive solution. It does not keep the unauthorized persons from entering, and so is not a totally secure solution. Optical turnstiles, speedgates Security staff should carefully evaluate its facility’s needs and consider the technology that is built into the door itself Security staff should carefully evaluate its facility’s needs and consider the technology that is built into the door itself. Not all security entrances work the same way. And, there will always be a balance between security and convenience – the more secure the entry, the less convenient it is for your personnel and visitors to enter your facility. For example, it takes more time to provide 2-factor authentication and enter through a mantrap portal than to provide only one credential and enter through an optical turnstile or speedgate. Perimeter protection So, it is an important first step to determine what is right at every entrance point within and around the perimeter. Remember that convenience does not equate to throughput. Convenience is the ease and speed of entry experienced by each individual crossing that threshold, while throughput relates to the speed at which many individuals can gain access to the facility. A more convenient entry makes a better first impression on visitors and is good for overall employee morale. Throughput is more functional; employees need to get logged in to begin their workday (and often to clock in to get paid), and they quickly become frustrated and dissatisfied when waiting in a long line to enter or exit the premises. Considering form and function when designing a security entrance can ensure that those requiring both high-security and convenience are appeased.

Home Monitoring At The Edge: Advanced Security In The Hands Of Consumers
Home Monitoring At The Edge: Advanced Security In The Hands Of Consumers

Imagine a home surveillance camera monitoring an elderly parent and anticipating potential concerns while respecting their privacy. Imagine another camera predicting a home burglary based on suspicious behaviors, allowing time to notify the homeowner who can in turn notify the police before the event occurs—or an entire network of cameras working together to keep an eye on neighborhood safety. Artificial Intelligence vision chips A new gen of AI vision chips are pushing advanced capabilities such as behavior analysis and higher-level security There's a new generation of artificial intelligence (AI) vision chips that are pushing advanced capabilities such as behavior analysis and higher-level security to the edge (directly on devices) for a customizable user experience—one that rivals the abilities of the consumer electronics devices we use every day. Once considered nothing more than “the eyes” of a security system, home monitoring cameras of 2020 will leverage AI-vision processors for high-performance computer vision at low power consumption and affordable cost—at the edge—for greater privacy and ease of use as well as to enable behavior analysis for predictive and preemptive monitoring. Advanced home monitoring cameras With this shift, camera makers and home monitoring service providers alike will be able to develop new edge-based use cases for home monitoring and enable consumers to customize devices to meet their individual needs. The result will be increased user engagement with home monitoring devices—mirroring that of cellphones and smart watches and creating an overlap between the home monitoring and consumer electronics markets. A quick step back reminds us that accomplishing these goals would have been cost prohibitive just a couple of years ago. Face recognition, behavior analysis, intelligent analytics, and decision-making at this level were extremely expensive to perform in the cloud. Additionally, the lag time associated with sending data to faraway servers for decoding and then processing made it impossible to achieve real-time results. Cloud-based home security devices The constraints of cloud processing certainly have not held the industry back, however. Home monitoring, a market just seven years young, has become a ubiquitous category of home security and home monitoring devices. Consumers can choose to install a single camera or doorbell that sends alerts to their phone, a family of devices and a monthly manufacturer’s plan, or a high-end professional monitoring solution. While the majority of these devices do indeed rely on the cloud for processing, camera makers have been pushing for edge-based processing since around 2016. For them, the benefit has always been clear: the opportunity to perform intelligent analytics processing in real-time on the device. But until now, the balance between computer vision performance and power consumption was lacking and camera companies weren’t able to make the leap. So instead, they have focused on improving designs and the cloud-centric model has prevailed. Hybrid security systems Even with improvements, false alerts result in unnecessary notifications and video recording Even with improvements, false alerts (like tree branches swaying in the wind or cats walking past a front door) result in unnecessary notifications and video recording— cameras remain active which, in the case of battery powered cameras, means using up valuable battery life. Hybrid models do exist. Typically, they provide rudimentary motion detection on the camera itself and then send video to the cloud for decoding and analysis to suppress false alerts. Hybrids provide higher-level results for things like people and cars, but their approach comes at a cost for both the consumer and the manufacturer. Advanced cloud analytics Advanced cloud analytics are more expensive than newly possible edge-based alternatives, and consumers have to pay for subscriptions. In addition, because of processing delays and other issues, things like rain or lighting changes (or even bugs on the camera) can still trigger unnecessary alerts. And the more alerts a user receives, the more they tend to ignore them—there are simply too many. In fact, it is estimated that users only pay attention to 5% of their notifications. This means that when a package is stolen or a car is burglarized, users often miss the real-time notification—only to find out about the incident after the fact. All of this will soon change with AI-based behavior analysis, predictive security, and real-time meaningful alerts. Predictive monitoring while safeguarding user privacy These days, consumers are putting more emphasis on privacy and have legitimate concerns about being recorded while in their homes. Soon, with AI advancements at the chip level, families will be able to select user apps that provide monitoring without the need to stream video to a company server, or they’ll have access to apps that record activity but obscure faces. Devices will have the ability to only send alerts according to specific criteria. If, for example, an elderly parent being monitored seems particularly unsteady one day or seems especially inactive, an application could alert the responsible family member and suggest that they check in. By analyzing the elderly parent’s behavior, the application could also predict a potential fall and trigger an audio alert for the person and also the family. AI-based behavior analysis Ability to analyze massive amounts of data locally and identify trends is a key advantage of AI at the edge The ability to analyze massive amounts of data locally and identify trends or perform searches is a key advantage of AI at the edge, for both individuals and neighborhoods. For example, an individual might be curious as to what animal is wreaking havoc in their backyard every night. In this case, they could download a “small animal detector” app to their camera which would trigger an alert when a critter enters their yard. The animal could be scared off via an alarm and—armed with video proof—animal control would have useful data for setting a trap. Edge cameras A newly emerging category of “neighborhood watch” applications is already connecting neighbors for significantly improved monitoring and safety. As edge cameras become more commonplace, this category will become increasingly effective. The idea is that if, for example, one neighbor captures a package thief, and then the entire network of neighbors will receive a notification and a synopsis video showing the theft. Or if, say, there is a rash of car break-ins and one neighbor captures video of a red sedan casing their home around the time of a recent incident, an AI vision-based camera could be queried for helpful information: Residential monitoring and security The camera could be asked for a summary of the dates and times that it has recorded that particular red car. A case could be made if incident times match those of the vehicle’s recent appearances in the neighborhood. Even better, if that particular red car was to reappear and seems (by AI behavior analysis) to be suspicious, alerts could be sent proactively to networked residents and police could be notified immediately. Home monitoring in 2020 will bring positive change for users when it comes to monitoring and security, but it will also bring some fun. Consumers will, for example, be able to download apps that do things like monitor pet activity. They might query their device for a summary of their pet’s “unusual activity” and then use those clips to create cute, shareable videos. Who doesn’t love a video of a dog dragging a toilet paper roll around the house? AI at the Edge for home access control Home access control via biometrics is one of many new edge-based use cases that will bring convenience to home monitoring Home access control via biometrics is one of many new edge-based use cases that will bring convenience to home monitoring, and it’s an application that is expected to take off soon. With smart biometrics, cameras will be able to recognize residents and then unlock their smart front door locks automatically if desired, eliminating the need for keys. And if, for example, an unauthorized person tries to trick the system by presenting a photograph of a registered family member’s face, the camera could use “3D liveness detection” to spot the fake and deny access. With these and other advances, professional monitoring service providers will have the opportunity to bring a new generation of access control panels to market. Leveraging computer vision and deep neural networks Ultimately, what camera makers strive for is customer engagement and customer loyalty. These new use cases—thanks to AI at the edge—will make home monitoring devices more useful and more engaging to consumers. Leveraging computer vision and deep neural networks, new cameras will be able to filter out and block false alerts, predict incidents, and send real-time notifications only when there is something that the consumer is truly interested in seeing. AI and computer vision at the edge will enable a new generation of cameras that provide not only a higher level of security but that will fundamentally change the way consumers rely on and interact with their home monitoring devices.

Latest PCSC news

PCSC And Coolfire Solutions Collaborate To Deliver Top-level Capabilities For Access And Security
PCSC And Coolfire Solutions Collaborate To Deliver Top-level Capabilities For Access And Security

PCSC, a designer and manufacturer of access control solutions and Coolfire Solutions, a St. Louis based software company known for creating Military-Grade situational awareness platforms, collaborate to deliver top-level capabilities for access and security. Coolfire Solutions created its innovative Ronin Platform to deliver software that sits on top of existing systems and infrastructure to transform data into actionable intelligence. Originally developed for the U.S. military, the Ronin Platform is being widely adopted by industry leaders and organizations who recognize the importance of placing the right data, in the right hands, in real-time, so that intelligent decisions can be made. LiNC-NXG PSIM System Stacking the Ronin Platform on top of the data provided by PCSC’s LiNC-NXG PSIM system provides a robust, real-time common operational pictureStacking the Ronin Platform on top of the data provided by PCSC’s LiNC-NXG physical security information management system provides a robust, real-time common operational picture, visually representing physical security events, and enabling a coordinated security response. For instance, urgent security related event details are pushed to mobile devices of nearby security officials for immediate action. An additional benefit, in the case of an on-premises environment, the underlying access management system is not exposed, only the top-level data is managed. Extend The Capabilities Of Access Solutions “An extremely impressive GUI for our industry and an actionable set of features extend the capabilities of PCSC’s access solutions for real-time response,” said Mas Kosaka, President and CEO of PCSC. “The expansion possibilities are virtually limitless too. We’re excited to debut the capabilities of Ronin to our Business Partners during the PCSC Symposium in conjunction with ISC West, the largest security industry trade show in the U.S.” Coolfire Solutions and PCSC have the experience and capabilities to transform the way security professionals do their job every day" “Coolfire Solutions and PCSC have the experience and capabilities to transform the way security professionals do their job every day. We can maximize the value of existing technology investments by combining data from any source and making it actionable," said Don Sharp, CEO at Coolfire Solutions. "Security professionals have an incredibly challenging job and it’s only getting tougher. By bringing all of their critical data onto a single pane of glass we can increase the level of security while driving significant operational efficiencies.”

Suprema To Globally Provide And Support BioConnect Identity Platform
Suprema To Globally Provide And Support BioConnect Identity Platform

The BioConnect Identity Platform provides an integration of Suprema's biometric solutions with the majority of leading access control systems BioConnect and Suprema have announced Suprema's launch of the BioConnect Identity Platform. Developed by BioConnect, Suprema's long-standing strategic partner in North America, the BioConnect Identity Platform provides an integration of Suprema's biometric solutions with majority of the leading access control systems in the global security market. Under the appointment, Suprema will provide and support the BioConnect Identity Platform globally from June 1st, 2016 onward. Powerful Integration FeaturesWith the BioConnect Identity Platform's powerful integration features and BioConnect's and Suprema's partner eco-systems, enterprises benefit from the ability to take advantage of deploying biometrics with their existing (or their choice of) access control vendor, standards, devices and way of operating. The BioConnect Identity Platform enables the seamless integration of Suprema's biometric terminals with access control systems, ERP and time and attendance systems, supporting biometric and multi-factor authentication, biometric enrollments and user ID management. One Central System The solution enables greater security, identity assurance and convenience from one central system and has ultimately changed the way that the physical access control market can consume biometrics as an authentication strategy. No other manufacturer around the world has been able to offer this level and quality of integrations - with the BioConnect Identity Platform boasting over 20. "With the BioConnect Identity Platform, BioConnect complements our goal of providing industry-leading biometric security solutions to the global market. The product is a ready-made bridge solution that provides easier integration of cutting-edge Suprema biometric technology together with a customer's choice of leading access control systems," said Young Moon, VP of Suprema. "We are looking forward to providing the BioConnect Identity Platform to a more global security market and are excited to offer our customers a seamless and cost-effective way of adopting Suprema's biometric security solutions," Moon added. Innovative Technologies From the perspective of the access control provider, the BioConnect Identity Platform opens up the option to provide a Suprema biometric solution and continue to benefit from the complete product line as Suprema brings new and innovative technologies to market. "As a Suprema partner we have experienced a lot of growth in the North American and UK markets due to its leadership and continued emphasis on producing biometric products of superior quality, versatility and range," said Steve Greb, Strategic Director of Business Development at BioConnect. "We're very excited to draw on Suprema's impressive partner network and continue to build out our Quest for Rightful Identity on a global scale." Integration With Leading Systems The BioConnect Identity Platform integrates the following leading access control systems with the Suprema biometric terminals; ACT ACTManage, AMAG Symmetry, Axis A1001, Brivo OnAir/OnSite, Genetec Security Center, IMRON IS2000, Lenel OnGuard, Open Options dnaFusion, Paxton Net2, Honeywell ProWatch, Honeywell WINPAK, RS2 AccessIT!, S2 Netbox, Software House CCURE 9000, Stanley SecureNET, Gallagher Command Centre and now PCSC LiNC-PLUS. Suprema and BioConnect will team together to showcase the BioConnect Identity Platform at IFSEC 2016 in London on June 21st-23rd at Stand E1400.

Do’s And Don’ts Of Managing Legacy Systems – Migration Better Than Rip-And-Replace For Enhancing Security Control System Functionality
Do’s And Don’ts Of Managing Legacy Systems – Migration Better Than Rip-And-Replace For Enhancing Security Control System Functionality

Systems may be reliable and performing as originally intended, but can also beoutdated in comparison to current technology offerings Let’s start by defining what a legacy system is in the context of a security control system. Legacy refers to an installed and operating security control system made up of numerous components, both hardware and software, that have been eclipsed by newer technologies. A shortage of parts and pieces may be creeping in, and it’s also likely the older stuff has a service tech scratching his head when faced with a configuration setting or data entry protocol. The newer technologies, however, may still be providing much of the desired functionality required by the legacy system user. Legacy in this context then is not necessarily a pejorative term. The system may be both reliable and performing as originally intended but is outdated in comparison to current technology offerings both from a communications standpoint and as it relates to applications and data mining. So what to do? For openers, as my dad would day, do a Ben Franklin list of do’s and don’ts. Naturally you’d love to move to a new, bigger or smaller, better and faster system. But, first, what does that list look like? I for one think is might begin to look like this: Things To Do When Managing Legacy Systems Do you have a handle on your current technology capabilities? Many legacy systems are underutilised and have features that are not used. Revisit your systems capabilities: You are likely to make some pleasant discoveries. Do you have a handle on your current technology capabilities? Many legacy systems are underutilized and have features that are not used Do you currently know how all of the pieces and parts in your system are currently communicating? A great start for planning the next steps is to understand the “plumbing.” Associated with that is the location of communication; specifically, how are things wired and where are they terminated, recorded and catalogued? What does your power distribution for the system components look like? Do you have backup and other means of maintaining operations during a loss of power, and where is that stuff? If not done recently, this step provides an opportunity to ensure you are ready for things that don’t happen and also to revisit codes. It’s always worthwhile if a maintenance provider is available to a system test in this area, or it can be self-conducted. What is the state of your record management, and when was the last time you did some basic housekeeping, such as backup and the like? If you don’t remember when you did it last, stop reading and go do some housekeeping — it’s clearly due now! What works for you and your organization, and what have you developed a work-around for? If your “super users” have found ways to manage desired system outcomes by some clever workaround, are there other desired features?  Do you have a relationship with an authorized service provider or an on-staff trained first responder? Do you have attic stock (stuff you own) to support those older components? I like to think of it like making a road trip with a spare tire and basics in the trunk in case an extended unplanned stop on the side of the road interrupts your trip. Have you developed a plan for an eventual upgrade? What’s first, what does it cost and whom will I let provide pricing to do so?  Rip-and-replace isn't your only option. There are many products and servicesavailable to migrate from a legacy to next steps utilizing embedded infrastructure Planning And Management What are my/your basic functional requirements, and where are the gaps now you must fill for enterprise sustainability? That legacy system likely has paid its way and now needs to be retired; I’m not ready either. Do you have a business case for this refresh – applications, data mining, new and reporting and risk mitigation strategies? If not, you are missing this first step of legacy migration planning and management. Managing the age includes a system exit strategy. Getting C suite, namely your CFO’s, attention is key; sustainability of your enterprise is 101, so functionality as it relates to risk mitigation is essential to keeping your entity flourishing. So What Are The DON’T’s? Don’t trivialize the migration or response to the Do’s or you’ll end up in a big To Do. Don’t minimize the relationship with existing integration resources you have worked with, old and new. Organizations evolve, some for the best, some not so. Refresh these relationships as well; resources are like bridges – you never know when a crossing is needed. Don’t rush into the latest and greatest; be wary of who’s definition you subscribe to. There’s a reason they call it the “cutting” edge. Don’t believe that rip-and-replace is your only option. There are many legacy systems in our industry, and many well-made and well-thought-out products and services are available to migrate from a legacy to next steps utilising embedded infrastructure. The bottom line: Define your parameters, select your partners and engage companies with a history of legacy migration and thought leadership. If your legacy includes some products with forward-thinking engineering thought leadership, you may be able to manage your needs with security control board-level replacements or the flashing of new firmware and upgrades to software. I‘m aware of several companies whose products elegantly move through time, adding new applications and functionality without wholesale rip-and-replace. These legacies carry on. The market has responded to you and others eager to know their options. There are many ingenious and clever ways to upgrade communications and transport of data, reliable mainstream products designed to meet this challenge head-on. There are solutions aimed at allowing you to use current IT and Internet of Things (IoT) apps and functionality. However, there are also quite a number of technology partners able help make the leap from analog to digital using existing pathways. The bottom line: Define your parameters, select your partners and engage companies with a history of legacy migration and thought leadership. They are most likely to produce the best results and allow you to leave behind the legacy you want to be associated with.

Related white papers

Access Control & Intelligent Vehicle Screening

3 Reasons To Migrate To A New Access Control System

Mobile Access- What You Need To Know (Part 1)