Launching this month, the intensive educational sessions feature hands-on training on the Next Level system as well as IP cameras from Axis Communications
The two-day course will feature comprehensive training on IP-based video surveillance and access control services

Next Level Security Systems, a developer of a new breed of unified, networked security solutions, recently announced its new series of certification classes, which offer advanced training on Next Level’s unified security management platform. The two-day courses, to be held across North America in 2013, feature comprehensive training on IP-based video surveillance, access control, video analytics and cloud-based security services. Resellers will learn how to install, manage and troubleshoot the award-winning NLSS Gateway and integrate IP cameras, access control devices and intrusion panels.

Launching this month, the intensive educational sessions feature hands-on training on the Next Level system as well as IP cameras from Axis Communications and Sony, edge-based access control devices from HID Global and intrusion panels from DMP.  Discussions will cover best practices for implementing an IP-based system, the benefits of a unified platform, and ways in which these new devices and services help resellers realize new business opportunities.

Next Level certified partners obtain a host of benefits including priority technical support, lead generation and premiere exposure on Next Level’s Web site. Certified resellers also receive a certificate of completion after successfully passing the certification exam at the end of the training course. Unlike other certifications, Next Level certifies the individual who completes the program rather than the company to best control certification levels and benefits. Upon completion of the course, Next Level Certified Resellers receive a free NLSS Gateway 500.

“Our intensive training seminars allow us to demonstrate the value of our unified security management platform and the ease with which it integrates with best-of-class providers,” said Jumbi Edulbehram, Vice President of Business Development, Next Level Security Systems. “Our goal is to help our partners and users achieve the knowledge and tools necessary to work successfully with our solutions.”

The first certification class is scheduled to be held on Jan. 29-30 in Pleasanton, Calif., followed by classes in St. Louis, Mo., Dallas, Montreal and Atlanta. To see the complete list of course locations or to register, visit our website at http://www.nlss.com/support-training.html.

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