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Physical Security And The Cloud: Why One Can’t Work Without The Other
Physical Security And The Cloud: Why One Can’t Work Without The Other

Human beings have a long-standing relationship with privacy and security. For centuries, we’ve locked our doors, held close our most precious possessions, and been wary of the threats posed by thieves. As time has gone on, our relationship with security has become more complicated as we’ve now got much more to be protective of. As technological advancements in security have got smarter and stronger, so have those looking to compromise it. Cybersecurity Cybersecurity, however, is still incredibly new to humans when we look at the long relationship that we have with security in general. As much as we understand the basics, such as keeping our passwords secure and storing data in safe places, our understanding of cybersecurity as a whole is complicated and so is our understanding of the threats that it protects against. However, the relationship between physical security and cybersecurity is often interlinked. Business leaders may find themselves weighing up the different risks to the physical security of their business. As a result, they implement CCTV into the office space, and alarms are placed on doors to help repel intruders. Importance of cybersecurity But what happens when the data that is collected from such security devices is also at risk of being stolen, and you don’t have to break through the front door of an office to get it? The answer is that your physical security can lose its power to keep your business safe if your cybersecurity is weak. As a result, cybersecurity is incredibly important to empower your physical security. We’ve seen the risks posed by cybersecurity hacks in recent news. Video security company Verkada recently suffered a security breach as malicious attackers obtained access to the contents of many of its live camera feeds, and a recent report by the UK government says two in five UK firms experienced cyberattacks in 2020. Cloud computing – The solution Cloud stores information in data centres located anywhere in the world, and is maintained by a third party Cloud computing offers a solution. The cloud stores your information in data centres located anywhere in the world and is maintained by a third party, such as Claranet. As the data sits on hosted servers, it’s easily accessible while not being at risk of being stolen through your physical device. Here’s why cloud computing can help to ensure that your physical security and the data it holds aren’t compromised. Cloud anxiety It’s completely normal to speculate whether your data is safe when it’s stored within a cloud infrastructure. As we are effectively outsourcing our security by storing our important files on servers we have no control over - and, in some cases, limited understanding of - it’s natural to worry about how vulnerable this is to cyber-attacks. The reality is, the data that you save on the cloud is likely to be a lot safer than that which you store on your device. Cyber hackers can try and trick you into clicking on links that deploy malware or pose as a help desk trying to fix your machine. As a result, they can access your device and if this is where you’re storing important security data, then it is vulnerable. Cloud service providers Cloud service providers offer security that is a lot stronger than the software in the personal computer Cloud service providers offer security that is a lot stronger than the software that is likely in place on your personal computer. Hyperscalers such as Microsoft and Amazon Web Service (AWS) are able to hire countless more security experts than any individual company - save the corporate behemoth - could afford. These major platform owners have culpability for thousands of customers on their cloud and are constantly working to enhance the security of their platforms. The security provided by cloud service providers such as Claranet is an extension of these capabilities. Cloud resistance Cloud servers are located in remote locations that workers don’t have access to. They are also encrypted, which is the process of converting information or data into code to prevent unauthorized access. Additionally, cloud infrastructure providers like ourselves look to regularly update your security to protect against viruses and malware, leaving you free to get on with your work without any niggling worries about your data being at risk from hackers. Data centres Cloud providers provide sophisticated security measures and solutions in the form of firewalls and AI Additionally, cloud providers are also able to provide sophisticated security measures and solutions in the form of firewalls and artificial intelligence, as well as data redundancy, where the same piece of data is held within several separate data centres. This is effectively super-strong backup and recovery, meaning that if a server goes down, you can access your files from a backup server. Empowering physical security with cybersecurity By storing the data gathered by your physical security in the cloud, you're not just significantly reducing the risk of cyber-attacks, but also protecting it from physical threats such as damage in the event of a fire or flood. Rather than viewing your physical and cybersecurity as two different entities, treat them as part of one system: if one is compromised, the other is also at risk. They should work in tandem to keep your whole organization secure.

The Intrinsic Role Of Lighting For Video Surveillance Clarity And Performance
The Intrinsic Role Of Lighting For Video Surveillance Clarity And Performance

The sound of sirens in the distance is commonplace, nowadays. Whether related to a medical emergency or everyday crimes, such as theft, property crimes, and so on, we’re all accustomed to hearing these sirens by now. It is worth noting that many incidents that police respond to take place at night. According to a recent report by the Sleep Judge, more than half of murders, manslaughter, sexual assaults, robberies, aggravated assaults and motor vehicle thefts happen long after the sun has set. To anyone looking to address the round-the-clock security challenge, deploying the most comprehensive surveillance solution is a must, and this means, looking at the instrumental role illumination plays in video capture. Limitations of Traditional Video Surveillance If surveillance cameras can’t be used to prevent, detect and/or resolve crimes that occur in these areas, the entire security operation is obsolete For surveillance cameras relying on video analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver functionalities such as facial recognition, license plate reading and motion detection, nighttime crimes can pose something of a problem. Without adequate illumination, images from video cameras are grainy and unusable. Without proper lighting, potential criminals and moving objects essentially become indistinguishable, at night, thereby inhibiting even the most advanced security technologies. This limitation of traditional surveillance technology not only hinders immediate police response, but it also stops crime investigations dead in their tracks. Often, without video evidence that is clear and discernible, conviction in a court of law is next to impossible. A common response to this issue is to place security cameras near streetlights or well-lit areas. After all, according to NPR, street lights are effective in deterring crime,  as “there are people — neighbors, pedestrians or police — to actually see suspicious activity.” However, even if streetside and primary entrances are well lit, the areas that still need most to be surveilled are rear or side doorways shrouded by darkness, unlit back alleys, and so on. If surveillance cameras can’t be used to prevent, detect and resolve crimes that occur in these areas, the entire security operation is obsolete. Best-in-class security solutions must be able to see everything, day and night. A Purpose-Designed Solution to the Problem Addressing this issue is easier than you might think. Much like a human eye needs some sort of light to “see,” so does video surveillance technology. Integrating external illuminators into a security solution can optimize camera performance exponentially, expanding a camera’s video capture and coverage abilities and ensuring the operation of video analytics, day and night. Opting for an external illuminator allows system integrators to select a device that matches the exact emission range of a camera’s field of view (FOV). The result is an evenly lit visual field, where captured images are clear and effective for security purposes. The two most common options available to integrators include infrared (IR) and white light illuminators. Each technology is built to optimize particular deployments, depending on their needs. Infrared Versus White Light IR illuminators emit IR light, which is invisible to the human eye and perfect for covert surveillance operations. When cameras need to be able to detect potential threats over long distances, IR illuminators are perfect for the job as they typically have longer emission ranges. IR illuminators are optimal for surveillance operations in license plate recognition, border patrol, safe cities, theme park, and medical sleep lab applications. If an end user needs to implement full-color video analytics for identification purposes, such as facial, object and license plate recognition, white light illuminators are undoubtedly an integrator’s best bet. IR illumination and traditional thermal security cameras, after all, are only able to provide black-and-white images, whereas object recognition software often identifies objects based on their color. White light illuminators installed alongside AI-powered surveillance cameras enable enhanced video image clarity, which, optimizes video analytics performance. When customers want to physically deter suspicious activity, deploying white light illuminators is effective. A recent study out of Crime Labs New York found that businesses that deployed visible lights to deter crime “experienced crime rates that were significantly lower,” which “led to a 36 percent reduction in ‘index crimes’”. On top of all this, LED based white lights operate at low running costs and typically have long lifespans, saving end users thousands of dollars a year in energy costs without having to sacrifice surveillance optimization. External Versus Built-In Illumination Security customers looking to use lighting to deter crime and improve the performance of video surveillance may consider “all-in-one" solutions, as some cameras have LEDs (light emitting diodes) built into them. These LEDs typically encircle the lens and therefore shed light in whatever direction the camera is pointed. However convenient these may seem, built-in illumination can cause problems.Cameras deployed without proper illumination are rendered blind, especially at night First, LEDs built into cameras and next to other electronic components often cause heat to build up, which attracts insects that can trigger motion detection and obstruct a camera’s view. This heat buildup also shortens the LED lights lifespan. Built-in LEDs also tend to create “hot spots” with glare and reflection back into the camera, often because these lights only cover a 30-degree field of view (FOV), even though the average camera’s FOV is 90 degrees. This issue can severely limit a camera’s visibility, essentially rendering those remaining 60 degrees dark and unusable. All in all, when integrating lighting solutions into your security deployment, a cost-effective solution that enhances a camera’s video capture and coverage abilities, are external illuminators because they offer flexible choices of field of view and distances. Best-in-Class Solution When it comes to criminal conviction in a court of law, “seeing really is believing.” Cameras deployed without proper illumination are rendered blind, especially at night, just as any security officer would be when patrolling the same unlit area. To guarantee end users the most reliable and highest performing security solution, consider integrating best-in-class illumination into your offerings.

ONVIF Profile T And H.265: The Evolution Of Video Compression
ONVIF Profile T And H.265: The Evolution Of Video Compression

In today’s market, efficient use of bandwidth and storage is an essential part of maintaining an effective video surveillance system. A video management system’s ability to provide analysis, real time event notifications and crucial image detail is only as a good as the speed and bandwidth of a surveillance network. In the physical security industry, H.264 is the video compression format used by most companies. Some companies also employ H.264 enhancements to compress areas of an image that are irrelevant to the user at a higher ratio within a video stream in order to preserve image quality for more important details like faces, license plates or buildings. The H.265, H.264’s successor, will be increasingly used for compression in the future. Some companies are already using H.265 in their cameras and video management systems, while a host of other manufacturers are certainly preparing for its broader adoption in the years to come. Video Compression Technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies. In some cases, H.265 can double the data compression ratio of H.264, while retaining the same quality. Increased compression rate translates into decreased storage requirements on hard drives, less bandwidth usage and fewer switches – all of which reduce overall costs of system ownership. H.265 compression delivers a lower bitrate than H.264, which is relevant to end users and integrators because the lower bitrate reduces strain on hardware and can reduce playback issues. It’s very important that the compression format that is used is supported in all of the different components of a system: cameras, desktop computers on which the VMS is running and the VMS itself. It is also good for end users and integrators to understand the basics of video compression. Having a basic understanding of compression allows users to tweak settings to reduce bandwidth usage even more. Many cameras come with default settings that can be changed to ultimately reduce costs. ONVIF Physical Security In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 but is not directly involved in developing the compression standards themselves. With Profile T, the new ONVIF video profile released will employ a new media service that is compression agnostic. This means that it can support new video compression formats, including H.265, as well as new audio compression formats, with the ability to include new video and audio codecs as needed in the future without having to redesign its media service. In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 Standardization organizations that are directly addressing new compression standards include the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) and a joint commission of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which is addressing the coding of audio, picture, multimedia and hypermedia information. Other compression formats on par with H.264 and H.265 are being developed by companies such as Google. H.265 Compression Formats Using products that employ H.265 compression will reduce costs through bandwidth reduction, as will changing default settings on cameras, which are often conservative. Having a basic understanding of compression formats and how to tweak camera factory default settings also gives integrators the ability to further reduce bandwidth for added costs savings and increased system performance. These enhancements will analyse which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly It is also worth noting that H.265 enhancements will likely be developed by camera manufacturers to further reduce bandwidth, as was the case with H.264. These enhancements will analyze which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly. While H.265 itself is ready for prime time, its value as a tool for IP-based surveillance systems is dependent on support for the codec in all parts of the system – the VMS, server hardware, graphics cards and camera. Though widespread H.265 adoption is predicted, providers of these components are jumping on the H.265 bandwagon at different rates of speed. ONVIF is including support for H.265 in its new video profile, Profile T, because it believes it will become the most widely used compression format and ONVIF recognizes the need to anticipate that migration as a future need of the industry. The new media service, which will be implemented with Profile T, will be future-proof in that when new compression formats are released in the future, ONVIF can adopt them very quickly. That flexibility will definitely help integrators.

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ETSI's Industry Specification Group On Securing Artificial Intelligence Announces Appointing New Chair And Vice Chairs
ETSI's Industry Specification Group On Securing Artificial Intelligence Announces Appointing New Chair And Vice Chairs

ETSI's new Industry Specification Group on Securing Artificial Intelligence (ISG SAI) announced that they met recently for their second meeting and appointed Alex Leadbeater (BT) as the Industry Specification Group’s new Chair. Dr. Kate Reed (NCSC) was appointed as First Vice Chair and Tieyan Li (Huawei) was appointed as Second Vice Chair. The second meeting of the ISG SAI, after the launch of the group in October 2019, was also the place to discuss work priorities and future scope of action. Industry Specification Group ISG SAI will work on securing AI from attack, mitigate against malicious AI and using AI to enhance security  The Industry Specification Group on Securing AI (ISG SAI) was created to develop technical specifications to mitigate threats arising from the deployment of AI throughout multiple ICT-related industries. The group will work on securing AI from attack, mitigating against malicious AI and using AI to enhance security measures. The purpose of the ETSI ISG SAI is to develop the technical knowledge that acts as a baseline in ensuring that artificial intelligence is secure. “I am delighted to be appointed as the Chairman for this exciting new group. Ensuring the security of Artificial Intelligence is a vital topic that affects many stakeholders and I look forward to seeing what work the group produces as it begins its work program in earnest,” says Alex Leadbeater, Chair of the Industry Specification Group on Securing Artificial Intelligence (ISG AI). AI Threat Ontology report The ISG AI group will create an AI Threat Ontology report to align terminology, a Problem Statement that will guide the work of the group, a Data Supply Chain Report summarizing the methods used and risks associated with sourcing data for training AI, a mitigation strategy report with guidance to mitigate the impact of AI threats, and security testing of AI. The next meeting of the Industry Specification Group on Securing Artificial Intelligence (ISG SAI) will be held in Sophia Antipolis, near Nice in France on 2 - 3 April 2020.

Renowned Security Industry Innovators And Subject Experts Lined-up To Speak At The Security Event 2019
Renowned Security Industry Innovators And Subject Experts Lined-up To Speak At The Security Event 2019

With only three weeks to go until The Security Event 2019, details of the fantastic speakers taking part in the professional seminar program has been released. Security Training Sessions Sessions in the free-to-attend program have been designed to give attendees practical training and best practice advice on new techniques and technologies on the market and are CPD certified by The Security Institute. By attending these innovative sessions and workshops, attendees can earn up to 35 CPD points across the three-day event. The speakers for the program have been hand-selected by the content team as some of the UK Security industry’s most experienced voices The speakers for the program have been hand-selected by the content team as some of the UK Security industry’s most experienced voices. They have been there, done that and are now ready to share their experience and know-how with interested parties. Visitors can hear from experienced industry speakers who will share their learnings and offer invaluable advice for on a range of topical issues at The Security Event 2019. Notable speakers list includes: Chris Aldous, Director, ASIS UK Phil Cain, Digital Voice Industry Engagement, BT David Gill MSc CSyP FSyI, Chartered Security Professional, Linx International Group Rick Mountfield, Chief Executive, The Security Institute Andrew Palmer, Gatwick Airport, Border Security Manager Dr Emma Philpott, CEO, IASME Consortium Mark Lindsay, Associate - Resilience, Security & Risk, Arup Professor Martin Gill, Director, Perpetuity Research Andrew Sieradzki, Director of Security and Technology, Buro Happold Andrew Palmer, Border Security Manager, Gatwick Airport Darren Stanton - The Human Lie Detector And many more

Allied Market Research Expects Managed Security Services Market To Reach $40.97 Billion By 2022
Allied Market Research Expects Managed Security Services Market To Reach $40.97 Billion By 2022

IPS/DPS market is expected to exhibit a remarkable growth during the forecast period A new report published by Allied Market Research titled, "Managed Security Services Market - Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2014 - 2022", states that the global managed security services market is likely to reach revenue of $40.97 billion by 2022, growing at a CAGR of 16.6% from 2016 to 2022. North America is expected be the largest market for managed security services during the forecast period owing to the growing awareness about the information security among businesses.The managed security services market focuses on various applications which include managed IPS/IDS, DDoS, UTM, firewall management, endpoint security, and others. IPS/IDS constitute the highest market share as the they provide protection to any sized networks. The combined package of IDS and IPS solutions provides the features of both solutions in a single package. Nonetheless, endpoint security applications are witnessing growth with the rise in applications of mobile devices to access corporate network.Data SecurityBhawna Kohli, Research Manager at Allied Market Research states, “Executives across the globe are concerned about data security as this is directly linked to their brand reputation. Increasing rate of cyber crime activities, growing adoption of mobile devices to access corporate network, and rising importance of e-business have led to the development of effective security infrastructure with managed security services.”Generally, managed security services are delivered in two basic models, on-premise or customer’s premise equipment and cloud-based managed security service model. The on-premise or customers premise equipment constitutes the highest market share and is preferred in cases when organizations/companies are concerned about security of sensitive information over cloud. "Executives across the globeare concerned about datasecurity as this is directlylinked to their brand reputation" Growth In Security Awareness Based on organization size, the report covers businesses under two main groups such as large businesses and small- & medium-sized businesses. Financial loss incurred due to data theft and network damage affects both large businesses as well as small- & medium-sized businesses. Thus, small- & medium-sized businesses also have a significant share in revenue generation. North America currently constitutes the highest market share in the managed security services market during the forecast period. However, the Asia-Pacific region would witness the highest CAGR of 20.3% during the forecast period. A growth in security awareness and emphasis to maintain the brand image would contribute to the increasing demand for managed security services from various industry verticals. Key Findings IPS/DPS market is expected to exhibit a remarkable growth during the forecast period. On-premise or Customer Premise Equipment (CPE) deployment mode contributes the highest market share. The Asia-Pacific region is expected to exhibit a promising growth owing to increasing rate of adoption in the region. Industry participants focus on introducing new products with innovations and to improve their market share The managed security services market comprises dominant players such as IBM Corp., HP, Dell SecureWorks, Cisco Systems Inc., Symantec, AT&T, BT Group, Verizon, and others. These market players primarily focus on the development of new features, launch of innovative products with exceptional variations, and adoption of R&D and acquisition as their key strategies to establish their position in the market. Save Save

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