Pan tilts - Expert commentary

Overcoming Challenges And Mapping The Future Of Video Surveillance
Overcoming Challenges And Mapping The Future Of Video Surveillance

Over the last year, we have continued to see the rise of manufacturers from China in the mid- to low-end market for video surveillance - a trend that currently shows no signs of tapering. Additionally, the shift from analog to IP systems has remained consistent, with end users increasingly looking to network-enabled devices to mitigate risk from both a physical and cyber perspective. Complex network attacks in 2016 demonstrated the need for increased network security for network-connected devices such as IP cameras and network video recorders. More and more manufacturers are considering the potential for such attacks when designing updates for existing hardware and software technology, strengthening password requirements, incorporating robust data encryption, and educating integrators and end users on how to put protocols in place to protect the valuable information being collected. Increased Security Collaborations Today’s surveillance technology - and the new innovations right around the corner - incorporates more IT protocols in response to high-profile cyber incidents. As a result, IT standards will finally start being adopted by security system manufacturers over the course of the next few years. At the same time, we'll see increased collaboration between IT and security leaders within enterprises. Intelligent, Big Data Analysis Video technologies such as panoramic 360-degree cameras with advanced dewarping capabilities are being rapidly adopted, along with video analytics software that enables the extraction of data for business intelligence, apart from just security video. The future includes more widespread availability of cloud technologies and services. In 2017, we can look forward to the more widespread adoption of intelligent analytics and big data analysis, which has the potential to streamline processes and optimize sales operations for organizations to drive new levels of business intelligence. See the full coverage of 2016/2017 Review and Forecast articles here Save

Getting Crisis Management And Emergency Planning Requirements Right
Getting Crisis Management And Emergency Planning Requirements Right

Think of crisis management and emergency planning as a  customer service Do you have a written emergency management plan? Where is it? When was the last time you updated it? Developing and writing a corporate or organizational emergency management plan can take a long time. Once completed, however, the plan is there for you to access when you need it. In fact, that’s wrong. According to crisis management authority Michael J. Fagel, emergency planning is supposed to take forever, and it should never go onto a shelf where no one might ever look at it again. “Emergency planning for crisis management is never finished,” Fagel said. “Security is a process, a continuing task that you modify and refine to meet changing circumstances, while continuing to work on improving the overall system.” Fagel has spent nearly four decades in fire, rescue, emergency medical services, law enforcement, public health emergency management and corporate safety and security. His experience includes responding to crises and disasters including the Oklahoma City Bombing and the World Trade Center in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. He also led a team of experts that authored the 2013 book “Crisis Management and Emergency Planning: Preparing for Today’s Challenges,” which was published by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group. For Fagel, the security process moves forward through clear communications. “Emergency planning is a culture with a communications methodology, where people in a hierarchical structure or chain of command work together to make things work.  “By communications, I don’t mean radios, email and texting. I mean talking face-to-face and person-to-person. Think of crisis management and emergency planning as customer service. You, as my customer, make me understand what you need, and I provide it.” But It Won’t Happen Here The worst probably won’t happen, but something will undoubtedly happen. Maybe it won’t be 9/11, but there will be a crisis. So you need a plan, one that evolves and keeps pace with your organization’s risks and vulnerabilities. And you need your plan now. “Crisis management begins before the crisis,” said Fagel. “You can’t pass out your crisis manager business cards as the police arrive in response to an active shooter or bomb threat at your facility. According to crisis management authority Michael J. Fagel, emergency planning is supposed to take forever “You need to form relationships with first responders far ahead of time. You as the crisis manager must sit with the head of security and the building or campus manager and talk about and develop the plan.” Then you have to practice or drill the plan, continued Fagel. As your town’s crisis manager, what will you do if you lose the only hospital you have in your small town? Figure out what that means: It means that your response time to medical emergencies has grown from minutes to unacceptably high, because your town’s two ambulances must deliver patients to the hospital in the next town, which is 40 miles away. You should have talked to the EMTs and asked them what equipment they would want if you had to put together a couple of temporary ambulances. You would also have to find vehicles. Would the police lend you two vans? Do you live in a tornado alley? What happens if a tornado tears into your town’s middle school? Do the schools have a plan? You should probably talk to them about linking their plans with yours. “Crisis management and emergency planning require discussions, information, problem solving and facilitation ahead of time on a continuing basis,” says Fagel. “What are the risks and vulnerabilities? How can you mitigate risks and vulnerabilities? A crisis manager thinks and communicates about these issues daily, imagining what might happen and how to respond.” Currently, Fagel teaches courses in homeland security, terrorism, biodefense and other crisis management and emergency planning subjects at the Illinois Institute of Technology-Stuart School of Business, Masters in Public Affairs Program. He teaches similar courses at Northwestern University in the Masters of Public Policy and Administration Program. He also teaches courses in masters programs at Northern Illinois University, Benedictine University and Eastern Kentucky University.

IP Network Requirements For Video Surveillance/physical Security
IP Network Requirements For Video Surveillance/physical Security

IT networks are expanding to include more users and applications The use of corporate IT network infrastructure for physical security applications such as video surveillance presents unique challenges. Jack Fernandes, President & CEO of American Fibertek, makes a case for separate networks using specialized equipment and technologies specifically designed for video surveillance which could also integrate other physical security functions. In today’s business world, corporate IT networks are not only expanding to meet accelerating demand, but also to include more users and applications. As businesses use information technology (IT) to collect data from every corner of their business, the term “LAN sprawl” has been suggested to describe the multi-dimensional growth that is putting new stresses on the corporate network. One of the issues that comes with the expansion of local area networks (LANs) is how to control the network infrastructure, especially in relation to allowing users to access data.Given the transition of the physical security industry to systems based on Internet protocol (IP), often that data traveling along the enterprise LAN is related to physical security, including video surveillance. Video data can challenge networks both because it uses a lot of bandwidth and because the user has a high expectation of real-time video without latency. As growing networks accommodate the demands of more users and applications, it has become increasingly difficult for a video surveillance or security system to operate effectively. Many companies are concluding that the best approach is a separate IT infrastructure that is dedicated to video and other security systems.As the amount of network information flowing at any given time can lead to recording and viewing problems, video security systems should have their own network rather than running on a shared database. This approach can also take advantage of IT networking innovations designed specifically for the video and physical security marketplace. Advantages of a separate IP Network  for surveillance videoTraffic on a video-specific network does not have to compete with other network data or deal with video quality issues. Dedicating a separate network to video applications enables the system to be designed especially for that purpose, including use of technologies to maximize functionality and dependability. Traffic on a video-specific network does not have to compete with other network data Performance-maximizing technologies for video networks include devices to monitor the efficient operation of the network. Such devices take into account variables such as power, environmental conditions and bandwidth usage. Network technologies designed for security/video systems can also facilitate integration of a range of security-related functionality.The Unique Needs Of Physical SecurityPhysical security information systems, including video, are critical to a company's security operation and general well-being. The security mission requires fail-safe systems that operate dependably over long periods of time, as well as those that are ready to respond when needed. Security systems also must be scalable, flexible and able to adapt to a company's changing protection needs, and should not have to compete for network resources with the growing number of other applications and users on the enterprise network.Video’s bandwidth and system needs are too extensive for it to be relegated as part of an already overburdened corporate network infrastructure. Security has historically operated separately from other corporate functions, an arrangement that supports its distinctly focused mission and enables information systems for video and security applications to operate effectively and mostly independent of other corporate operations. The security market has unique needs. Not all IT is suitable or appropriate for IP video surveillance. It takes specialized equipment to meet the specific needs of the video and security market.

Latest Pelco, Inc news

Pelco Launches The Pelco Learning Center Learning Management System
Pelco Launches The Pelco Learning Center Learning Management System

Pelco Learning Center (PLC) is an online platform that gives clients access to training content 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Users can smoothly manage their organization’s required certifications for key Pelco products, while increasing their knowledge of Pelco’s solutions to ensure their company is fully leveraging all that they have to offer. Other key benefits include: Organized eLearning content in a single location Tracked progress and performance More efficient learning and development time Reduced support time and cost during troubleshooting Improved buying experience for end users and resellers Access the PLC Portal to gain access to a wide range of practically beneficial training content and certification courses to maintain the competitive edge in the industry by harnessing all that Pelco has to offer.

Pelco Is Excited To Introduce Next Generation Of Sarix Enhanced IP Cameras
Pelco Is Excited To Introduce Next Generation Of Sarix Enhanced IP Cameras

Pelco’s Sarix Enhanced 3 cameras are designed to handle a broad range of lighting conditions while always delivering sharp footage. They also feature resolutions of up to 4K and true WDR as well as ultralow light performance and image stabilization capabilities. And with frame rates of up to 120 FPS at 1080p, the user also has the ability to slow down scenes of interest and capture detailed images in applications like traffic and gaming. This solution also comes with Pelco Smart Compression and h.265 encoding, which enable lower bit rates without compromising image quality. Reduce storage and bandwidth costs by compressing up to 70% depending on complexity and level of motion in the scene. Analytics: Enhanced with deep learning capability The Sarix Enhanced 3 cameras will pair perfectly with included Pelco Enhanced Analytics suite to enable one to quickly focus on situations needing immediate attention for faster response times. The solution will also act as a platform for advanced deep learning analytics, with superior accuracy in its ability to easily categorize objects within the scene. Sarix Enhanced 3 cameras will start to ship in February, beginning with 2 and 3 Megapixel dome cameras with 2.8-8mm lenses. Other models will follow over the next few months. 2 and 3 Megapixel dome cameras with 2.8-8mm lenses are now available for orders, and the remaining models will be available for order 8 weeks before ship dates.

EET Europarts Appoints Franceso Bellavia As New Sales Director For Surveillance & Security Division
EET Europarts Appoints Franceso Bellavia As New Sales Director For Surveillance & Security Division

EET Europarts, the globally renowned specialist technology distributor, is pleased to announce the appointment of Franceso (Frankie) Bellavia to the role of Sales Director - Surveillance & Security at the firm. EET Europarts are one of Europe’s major distributors across Server, Computer & Printer Parts, Storage & Networking, Surveillance & Security, Point of Sale & Auto ID, Professional AV & Digital Signage and Consumer Electronics. Sunil Bouri, Managing Director of EET Europarts UK, said, “We are pleased to appoint Frankie to this new role and further strengthen our position in Surveillance & Security since the acquisition of Pro-Vision Distribution. Frankie brings with him a wealth of industry experience and skills and along with his strong background in distribution and very personable character; he is a great addition to the team”. Surveillance & Security products Frankie and the team will support the growing need for Surveillance & Security products alongside our vendor partners" Furthermore, he adds “Frankie and the team will support the growing need for Surveillance & Security products alongside our vendor partners and assist our customers in complimenting their solutions and services with the extensive EET Europarts portfolio.” Frankie said, “I’m really looking forward to my new role at EET Europarts. With such a comprehensive product offering and growing team, there is a tremendous opportunity to support our customers further across Bosch, Idis, Pelco and Wisenet." Ubiquiti Master Distributor Frankie continued “We are also very strong within storage and networking, and for example, as leading Ubiquiti Master Distributor can offer Surveillance & Security customers a very popular product range used across many installations today.” Frankie will be supported by the experienced external sales force at EET Europarts and the internal teams across multiple office locations in the UK and Ireland.