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Physical Security And The Cloud: Why One Can’t Work Without The Other
Physical Security And The Cloud: Why One Can’t Work Without The Other

Human beings have a long-standing relationship with privacy and security. For centuries, we’ve locked our doors, held close our most precious possessions, and been wary of the threats posed by thieves. As time has gone on, our relationship with security has become more complicated as we’ve now got much more to be protective of. As technological advancements in security have got smarter and stronger, so have those looking to compromise it. Cybersecurity Cybersecurity, however, is still incredibly new to humans when we look at the long relationship that we have with security in general. As much as we understand the basics, such as keeping our passwords secure and storing data in safe places, our understanding of cybersecurity as a whole is complicated and so is our understanding of the threats that it protects against. However, the relationship between physical security and cybersecurity is often interlinked. Business leaders may find themselves weighing up the different risks to the physical security of their business. As a result, they implement CCTV into the office space, and alarms are placed on doors to help repel intruders. Importance of cybersecurity But what happens when the data that is collected from such security devices is also at risk of being stolen, and you don’t have to break through the front door of an office to get it? The answer is that your physical security can lose its power to keep your business safe if your cybersecurity is weak. As a result, cybersecurity is incredibly important to empower your physical security. We’ve seen the risks posed by cybersecurity hacks in recent news. Video security company Verkada recently suffered a security breach as malicious attackers obtained access to the contents of many of its live camera feeds, and a recent report by the UK government says two in five UK firms experienced cyberattacks in 2020. Cloud computing – The solution Cloud stores information in data centres located anywhere in the world, and is maintained by a third party Cloud computing offers a solution. The cloud stores your information in data centres located anywhere in the world and is maintained by a third party, such as Claranet. As the data sits on hosted servers, it’s easily accessible while not being at risk of being stolen through your physical device. Here’s why cloud computing can help to ensure that your physical security and the data it holds aren’t compromised. Cloud anxiety It’s completely normal to speculate whether your data is safe when it’s stored within a cloud infrastructure. As we are effectively outsourcing our security by storing our important files on servers we have no control over - and, in some cases, limited understanding of - it’s natural to worry about how vulnerable this is to cyber-attacks. The reality is, the data that you save on the cloud is likely to be a lot safer than that which you store on your device. Cyber hackers can try and trick you into clicking on links that deploy malware or pose as a help desk trying to fix your machine. As a result, they can access your device and if this is where you’re storing important security data, then it is vulnerable. Cloud service providers Cloud service providers offer security that is a lot stronger than the software in the personal computer Cloud service providers offer security that is a lot stronger than the software that is likely in place on your personal computer. Hyperscalers such as Microsoft and Amazon Web Service (AWS) are able to hire countless more security experts than any individual company - save the corporate behemoth - could afford. These major platform owners have culpability for thousands of customers on their cloud and are constantly working to enhance the security of their platforms. The security provided by cloud service providers such as Claranet is an extension of these capabilities. Cloud resistance Cloud servers are located in remote locations that workers don’t have access to. They are also encrypted, which is the process of converting information or data into code to prevent unauthorized access. Additionally, cloud infrastructure providers like ourselves look to regularly update your security to protect against viruses and malware, leaving you free to get on with your work without any niggling worries about your data being at risk from hackers. Data centres Cloud providers provide sophisticated security measures and solutions in the form of firewalls and AI Additionally, cloud providers are also able to provide sophisticated security measures and solutions in the form of firewalls and artificial intelligence, as well as data redundancy, where the same piece of data is held within several separate data centres. This is effectively super-strong backup and recovery, meaning that if a server goes down, you can access your files from a backup server. Empowering physical security with cybersecurity By storing the data gathered by your physical security in the cloud, you're not just significantly reducing the risk of cyber-attacks, but also protecting it from physical threats such as damage in the event of a fire or flood. Rather than viewing your physical and cybersecurity as two different entities, treat them as part of one system: if one is compromised, the other is also at risk. They should work in tandem to keep your whole organization secure.

The Intrinsic Role Of Lighting For Video Surveillance Clarity And Performance
The Intrinsic Role Of Lighting For Video Surveillance Clarity And Performance

The sound of sirens in the distance is commonplace, nowadays. Whether related to a medical emergency or everyday crimes, such as theft, property crimes, and so on, we’re all accustomed to hearing these sirens by now. It is worth noting that many incidents that police respond to take place at night. According to a recent report by the Sleep Judge, more than half of murders, manslaughter, sexual assaults, robberies, aggravated assaults and motor vehicle thefts happen long after the sun has set. To anyone looking to address the round-the-clock security challenge, deploying the most comprehensive surveillance solution is a must, and this means, looking at the instrumental role illumination plays in video capture. Limitations of Traditional Video Surveillance If surveillance cameras can’t be used to prevent, detect and/or resolve crimes that occur in these areas, the entire security operation is obsolete For surveillance cameras relying on video analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver functionalities such as facial recognition, license plate reading and motion detection, nighttime crimes can pose something of a problem. Without adequate illumination, images from video cameras are grainy and unusable. Without proper lighting, potential criminals and moving objects essentially become indistinguishable, at night, thereby inhibiting even the most advanced security technologies. This limitation of traditional surveillance technology not only hinders immediate police response, but it also stops crime investigations dead in their tracks. Often, without video evidence that is clear and discernible, conviction in a court of law is next to impossible. A common response to this issue is to place security cameras near streetlights or well-lit areas. After all, according to NPR, street lights are effective in deterring crime,  as “there are people — neighbors, pedestrians or police — to actually see suspicious activity.” However, even if streetside and primary entrances are well lit, the areas that still need most to be surveilled are rear or side doorways shrouded by darkness, unlit back alleys, and so on. If surveillance cameras can’t be used to prevent, detect and resolve crimes that occur in these areas, the entire security operation is obsolete. Best-in-class security solutions must be able to see everything, day and night. A Purpose-Designed Solution to the Problem Addressing this issue is easier than you might think. Much like a human eye needs some sort of light to “see,” so does video surveillance technology. Integrating external illuminators into a security solution can optimize camera performance exponentially, expanding a camera’s video capture and coverage abilities and ensuring the operation of video analytics, day and night. Opting for an external illuminator allows system integrators to select a device that matches the exact emission range of a camera’s field of view (FOV). The result is an evenly lit visual field, where captured images are clear and effective for security purposes. The two most common options available to integrators include infrared (IR) and white light illuminators. Each technology is built to optimize particular deployments, depending on their needs. Infrared Versus White Light IR illuminators emit IR light, which is invisible to the human eye and perfect for covert surveillance operations. When cameras need to be able to detect potential threats over long distances, IR illuminators are perfect for the job as they typically have longer emission ranges. IR illuminators are optimal for surveillance operations in license plate recognition, border patrol, safe cities, theme park, and medical sleep lab applications. If an end user needs to implement full-color video analytics for identification purposes, such as facial, object and license plate recognition, white light illuminators are undoubtedly an integrator’s best bet. IR illumination and traditional thermal security cameras, after all, are only able to provide black-and-white images, whereas object recognition software often identifies objects based on their color. White light illuminators installed alongside AI-powered surveillance cameras enable enhanced video image clarity, which, optimizes video analytics performance. When customers want to physically deter suspicious activity, deploying white light illuminators is effective. A recent study out of Crime Labs New York found that businesses that deployed visible lights to deter crime “experienced crime rates that were significantly lower,” which “led to a 36 percent reduction in ‘index crimes’”. On top of all this, LED based white lights operate at low running costs and typically have long lifespans, saving end users thousands of dollars a year in energy costs without having to sacrifice surveillance optimization. External Versus Built-In Illumination Security customers looking to use lighting to deter crime and improve the performance of video surveillance may consider “all-in-one" solutions, as some cameras have LEDs (light emitting diodes) built into them. These LEDs typically encircle the lens and therefore shed light in whatever direction the camera is pointed. However convenient these may seem, built-in illumination can cause problems.Cameras deployed without proper illumination are rendered blind, especially at night First, LEDs built into cameras and next to other electronic components often cause heat to build up, which attracts insects that can trigger motion detection and obstruct a camera’s view. This heat buildup also shortens the LED lights lifespan. Built-in LEDs also tend to create “hot spots” with glare and reflection back into the camera, often because these lights only cover a 30-degree field of view (FOV), even though the average camera’s FOV is 90 degrees. This issue can severely limit a camera’s visibility, essentially rendering those remaining 60 degrees dark and unusable. All in all, when integrating lighting solutions into your security deployment, a cost-effective solution that enhances a camera’s video capture and coverage abilities, are external illuminators because they offer flexible choices of field of view and distances. Best-in-Class Solution When it comes to criminal conviction in a court of law, “seeing really is believing.” Cameras deployed without proper illumination are rendered blind, especially at night, just as any security officer would be when patrolling the same unlit area. To guarantee end users the most reliable and highest performing security solution, consider integrating best-in-class illumination into your offerings.

ONVIF Profile T And H.265: The Evolution Of Video Compression
ONVIF Profile T And H.265: The Evolution Of Video Compression

In today’s market, efficient use of bandwidth and storage is an essential part of maintaining an effective video surveillance system. A video management system’s ability to provide analysis, real time event notifications and crucial image detail is only as a good as the speed and bandwidth of a surveillance network. In the physical security industry, H.264 is the video compression format used by most companies. Some companies also employ H.264 enhancements to compress areas of an image that are irrelevant to the user at a higher ratio within a video stream in order to preserve image quality for more important details like faces, license plates or buildings. The H.265, H.264’s successor, will be increasingly used for compression in the future. Some companies are already using H.265 in their cameras and video management systems, while a host of other manufacturers are certainly preparing for its broader adoption in the years to come. Video Compression Technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies. In some cases, H.265 can double the data compression ratio of H.264, while retaining the same quality. Increased compression rate translates into decreased storage requirements on hard drives, less bandwidth usage and fewer switches – all of which reduce overall costs of system ownership. H.265 compression delivers a lower bitrate than H.264, which is relevant to end users and integrators because the lower bitrate reduces strain on hardware and can reduce playback issues. It’s very important that the compression format that is used is supported in all of the different components of a system: cameras, desktop computers on which the VMS is running and the VMS itself. It is also good for end users and integrators to understand the basics of video compression. Having a basic understanding of compression allows users to tweak settings to reduce bandwidth usage even more. Many cameras come with default settings that can be changed to ultimately reduce costs. ONVIF Physical Security In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 but is not directly involved in developing the compression standards themselves. With Profile T, the new ONVIF video profile released will employ a new media service that is compression agnostic. This means that it can support new video compression formats, including H.265, as well as new audio compression formats, with the ability to include new video and audio codecs as needed in the future without having to redesign its media service. In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 Standardization organizations that are directly addressing new compression standards include the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) and a joint commission of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which is addressing the coding of audio, picture, multimedia and hypermedia information. Other compression formats on par with H.264 and H.265 are being developed by companies such as Google. H.265 Compression Formats Using products that employ H.265 compression will reduce costs through bandwidth reduction, as will changing default settings on cameras, which are often conservative. Having a basic understanding of compression formats and how to tweak camera factory default settings also gives integrators the ability to further reduce bandwidth for added costs savings and increased system performance. These enhancements will analyse which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly It is also worth noting that H.265 enhancements will likely be developed by camera manufacturers to further reduce bandwidth, as was the case with H.264. These enhancements will analyze which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly. While H.265 itself is ready for prime time, its value as a tool for IP-based surveillance systems is dependent on support for the codec in all parts of the system – the VMS, server hardware, graphics cards and camera. Though widespread H.265 adoption is predicted, providers of these components are jumping on the H.265 bandwagon at different rates of speed. ONVIF is including support for H.265 in its new video profile, Profile T, because it believes it will become the most widely used compression format and ONVIF recognizes the need to anticipate that migration as a future need of the industry. The new media service, which will be implemented with Profile T, will be future-proof in that when new compression formats are released in the future, ONVIF can adopt them very quickly. That flexibility will definitely help integrators.

Latest March Networks Corporation news

March Networks Signs Product And Services Contract With California Transportation Agency To Standardize Vehicle Fleet
March Networks Signs Product And Services Contract With California Transportation Agency To Standardize Vehicle Fleet

March Networks, a global video surveillance and video-based business intelligence solutions provider, is pleased to announce that one of California’s busiest transportation authorities will standardize its entire bus fleet on the company’s RideSafe mobile solution. RideSafe solution The US$ 4 million contract will see more than 400 buses deployed with March Networks’ complete end-to-end RideSafe solution. The contract includes cloud-based monitoring of all of the transportation authority’s mobile cameras and recorders, a services contract providing annual and recurring revenue for March Networks for up to 7 years. RideSafe solution enables transit operators to maintain the highest security for passengers and employees, respond quickly to emergency situations, and resolve liability claims faster with integrated surveillance video and vehicle metadata. It also provides peace of mind with sophisticated monitoring through March Networks’ Insight Monitoring and Resolution Service. Insight Monitoring and Resolution Service With Insight, March Networks’ managed services professionals proactively monitor all video devices and troubleshoot issues remotely, saving customers’ time and money by eliminating unnecessary truck rolls. If a physical update is required, March Networks immediately dispatches a technician to conduct onsite repair services. All activity is logged online, giving customers a complete view of their network via a secure web browser. RideSafe GT Series Hybrid Transit NVRs Fully integrated with Insight is March Networks’ RideSafe GT Series Hybrid Transit NVRs Fully integrated with Insight is March Networks’ RideSafe GT Series Hybrid Transit NVRs (Network Video Recorders), the backbone of the RideSafe solution. The highly reliable, Linux-based recording platforms are purpose-built for transportation environments, with industry-recognized SAE J1455-standards and tamper-proof enclosures that protect against dust and moisture. They allow operators to quickly access live and recorded video and search for incidents based on vehicle information, such as GPS location, when managed by March Networks Command for Transit video management software (VMS). Mobile cameras deployed As true hybrid appliances, the NVRs support a mix of analog and IP cameras, allowing transportation agencies to migrate to IP video cost-effectively and at their own pace. The California transportation authority will also deploy March Networks’ ruggedized mobile cameras, including its new SE2 Fleet Dash Camera and SE2 Fleet Wedge Camera. Both cameras deliver 2MP resolution and feature industry-first LED flicker mitigation technology, which suppresses the strobing in the recorded video caused by LED light sources. Eliminating flicker in surveillance video ensures brake lights and other light sources are not mistaken for flicker and allows for more accurate post-incident investigations. Cloud-based monitoring solution “By offering the most reliable video surveillance technology and secure cloud-based monitoring services, March Networks is meeting the needs of transportation customers and rapidly growing the services side of our business,” said Net Payne, March Networks’ Chief Sales & Marketing Officer. Net Payne adds, “Almost 27 million people rely on this transportation authority’s buses each year. We are proud that our RideSafe solution was chosen to help safeguard this ridership.”

March Networks Launches Its X-Series Hybrid Recorders With NVIDIA SoC Technology
March Networks Launches Its X-Series Hybrid Recorders With NVIDIA SoC Technology

March Networks, a global video surveillance and video-based business intelligence pioneer, is pleased to introduce its X-Series Hybrid Recorders, a new high-performance platform that’s optimized to support Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications with NVIDIA system-on-chip (SoC) technology. The X-Series is March Networks’ most powerful recording platform to date, delivering a 400% increase in throughput over its previous generation recorders. It is a true hybrid platform supporting a mix of analog, HD analog, and IP channels, but with all the power and storage capacity needed for demanding all-IP installations. Available in 16, 24, 32, 48, and 64-channel configurations, the embedded, Linux-based appliances also feature a dedicated AI engine and SoC technology from American GPU and AI computing pioneering NVIDIA. AI-powered applications NVIDIA’s rich ecosystem of partners will enable March Networks to accelerate the development of AI-powered applications and analytics for the X-Series as the company moves toward a fully AI-capable product line. In addition to the X-Series, March Networks also offers a line of AI-enabled IP cameras in its ME6 Series. The X-Series platform comes preconfigured with March Networks’ next-generation video management software, which supports future add-on applications like face recognition, as well as object detection, classification, and search, scheduled for release later. “We chose NVIDIA because of its proven leadership in AI and its extensive network of analytic partners, which will enable us to continually add new capability to the X-Series,” said Peter Strom, March Networks President & CEO. NVIDIA chipset With our customized cyber secure OS we are raising the bar on delivering the lowest total cost of ownership" “This platform builds upon March Networks’ reputation for delivering the most secure and long-lasting enterprise NVRs in the industry. “ “With our customized cyber secure Operating System (OS), proven ability to deliver NVRs with less than a 1% failure rate, and thousands of systems still operating after more than 10 years in service, we are once again raising the bar on delivering the lowest total cost of ownership solution available.” “The X-Series provides a clear migration path to IP video for businesses that still have significant analog deployments, including those in the financial and retail sectors, and the use of the NVIDIA chipset combined with its hybrid capability make it truly unique in the market.” X-Series features In keeping with March Networks’ commitment to security, ease of use, and reliability, the X-Series feature: A customized and embedded Linux OS that removes unnecessary services and applications and locks all non-essential network ports, reducing the likelihood of attack; the customized OS also has a reduced volume of code that helps optimize overall system performance and minimize The highest level of protection for customer data with complete end-to-end encryption (from camera to recorder to enterprise management system to client software) with cameras supporting RTP/RTSP over HTTPs. A new configuration tool that allows users to set up the recorders in just a few easy steps. A convenient embedded Wi-Fi dongle that will allow for an instant connection to the March Networks GURU Smartphone App so technicians can check the recorder’s warranty status, get in-field diagnostics, and do on-site wireless provisioning. Added redundancy with March Networks Shadow Archiving, an innovative feature that allows for seamless access to redundant video recorded on March Networks IP cameras, even after a network outage or power failure. The X-Series integrates seamlessly with March Networks’ Searchlight data analytics software, Command Enterprise Software, and cloud-based Insight Monitoring and Resolution Service for proactive video network monitoring and issue resolution. The platform is fully compliant with the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), Section 889.

What Are The Positive And Negative Effects Of COVID-19 To Security?
What Are The Positive And Negative Effects Of COVID-19 To Security?

The COVID-19 global pandemic had a life-changing impact on all of us in 2020, including a multi-faceted jolt on the physical security industry. With the benefit of hindsight, we can now see more clearly the exact nature and extent of that impact. And it’s not over yet: The pandemic will continue to be top-of-mind in 2021. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: What have been the positive and negative effects of Covid-19 on the physical security industry in 2020? What impact will it have on 2021?

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