Download PDF version Contact company
Maevex encoder functions as a video recorder, capturing MP4 files to NAS at resolutions up to 1080p60 for later review
Maevex H.264 encoders and decoders capture, stream, and decode video for video distribution over IP

Matrox Graphics Inc. recently announced three important new features for Matrox Maevex 5100 Series H.264 encoders/decoders that will be demonstrated for the first time at upcoming tradeshows including Integrated Systems Europe 2014 (Amsterdam RAI, Feb. 4-6, stand 11-M66) and Digital Signage Expo 2014 (Las Vegas, Feb. 12-13, booth 348).

Maevex encoders will soon support high quality H.264 video recording to a network-shared drive or network-attached storage (NAS) at resolutions up to Full HD 1080p60 with zero-latency pass-through of the video and audio signals, making it ideal for medical, transportation, military and surveillance applications.

Maevex decoders will soon provide a built-in fail-safe mode to ensure that pre-recorded digital signage content will automatically play on screen in the event of a lost network connection that interrupts streaming from a Maevex encoder. Clients can store the pre-recorded image or video clip in the decoder’s internal flash memory. When network connectivity is restored, the Maevex decoder reverts to the streaming content.

Maevex encoders bring another enhancement to digital signage applications. In addition to streaming to Maevex hardware decoders, Maevex encoders can be used to stream directly to digital signage software players such as those from DISE.

“Matrox Maevex 5100 Series encode/decode systems are in wide use for video distribution over standard IP networks for collaborative video walls, manufacturing and automation, process control, digital signage and many other applications,” said Ron Berty, Business Development Manager, Matrox Graphics. “The addition of high-quality video recording at up to 1080p60, plus fail-safe protection and support for software digital signage players, make Maevex even more versatile, providing a complete, cost-effective, multi-functional H.264 encoding/decoding/recording solution.”

Maevex H.264 encoders and decoders capture, stream, and decode video from a variety of sources for video distribution over IP and even allow for software-based decoding on non-Maevex devices. Bitrates are user definable between 100Kbps and 25Mbps allowing for multiple streams on both 100Mb and 1000Mb standard networks. Alternatively, the Maevex encoder functions as a video recorder, capturing MP4 files to NAS at resolutions up to 1080p60 for later review. Maevex units come bundled with Matrox PowerStream software, allowing for easy remote management of Maevex devices and enabling a wide variety of user-defined stream-management or recoding features.

Share with LinkedIn Share with Twitter Share with Facebook Share with Facebook
Download PDF version Download PDF version

In case you missed it

How Have Security Solutions Failed Our Schools?
How Have Security Solutions Failed Our Schools?

School shootings are a high-profile reminder of the need for the highest levels of security at our schools and education facilities. Increasingly, a remedy to boost the security at schools is to use more technology. However, no technology is a panacea, and ongoing violence and other threats at our schools suggest some level of failure. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: How have security solutions failed our schools and what is the solution?

Securing Mobile Vehicles: The Cloud and Solving Transportation Industry Challenges
Securing Mobile Vehicles: The Cloud and Solving Transportation Industry Challenges

Securing Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in the transportation industry is multi-faceted for a multitude of reasons. Pressures build for transit industry players to modernise their security systems, while also mitigating the vulnerabilities, risks, and growth-restrictions associated with proprietary as well as integrated solutions. There are the usual physical security obstacles when it comes to increasingly integrated solutions and retrofitting updated technologies into legacy systems. Starting with edge devices like cameras and intelligent sensors acquiring video, analytics and beyond, these edge devices are now found in almost all public transportation like buses, trains, subways, airplanes, cruise lines, and so much more. You can even find them in the world’s last manually operated cable car systems in San Francisco. The next layer to consider is the infrastructure and networks that support these edge devices and connect them to centralized monitoring stations or a VMS. Without this layer, all efforts at the edge or stations are in vain as you lose the connection between the two. And the final layer to consider when building a comprehensive transit solution is the software, recording devices, or viewing stations themselves that capture and report the video. The challenge of mobility However, the transportation industry in particular has a very unique challenge that many others do not – mobility. As other industries become more connected and integrated, they don’t usually have to consider going in and out or bouncing between networks as edge devices physically move. Obviously in the nature of transportation, this is key. Have you ever had a bad experience with your cellular, broadband or Wi-Fi at your home or office? You are not alone. The transportation industry in particular has a very unique challenge that many others do not – mobility Can you trust these same environments to record your surveillance video to the Cloud without losing any frames, non-stop 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year? To add to the complexity – how do you not only provide a reliable and secure solution when it’s mobile, traveling at varying speeds, and can be in/out of coverage using various wireless technologies? Waiting to upload video from a transport vehicle when it comes into port, the station, or any centralized location is a reactive approach that simply will not do any longer. Transit operations require a more proactive approach today and the ability to constantly know what is going on at any given time on their mobile vehicles, and escalate that information to headquarters, authorities, or law enforcement if needed; which can only occur with real-time monitoring. This is the ultimate question when it comes to collecting, analyzing, and sharing data from mobile vehicles – how to get the video from public transportation vehicles alike to headquarters in real time! Managing video data In order to answer this question, let’s get back to basics. The management and nature of video data differs greatly from conventional (IT) data. Not only is video conducted of large frames, but there are specific and important relationships among the frames and the timing between them. This relationship can easily get lost in translation if not handled properly. This is why it’s critical to consider the proper way to transmit large frames while under unstable or variable networks. The Internet and its protocols were designed more than two decades ago and purposed for conventional data. Although the Internet itself has not changed, today’s network environments run a lot faster, expand to further ranges, and support a variety of different types of data. Because the internet is more reliable and affordable than in the past some might think it can handle anything. However, it is good for data, but not for video. This combination makes it the perfect time to convert video recording to the Cloud! Video transmission protocol One of the main issues with today’s technology is the degradation of video quality when transmitting video over the Internet. ITS are in dire need for reliable transmission of real-time video recording. To address this need a radical, yet proven, video transmission protocol has recently been introduced to the market. It uses AI technology and to adapt to different environments in order to always deliver high quality, complete video frames. This protocol, when equipped with encryption and authentication, enables video to be transmitted reliably and securely over the Internet in a cloud environment. One of the main issues with today’s technology is the degradation of video quality when transmitting video over the Internet Finally, transportation industry has a video recording Cloud solution that is designed for (massive) video that can handle networks that might be experiencing high error rate. Such a protocol will not only answer the current challenges of the transportation industry, but also make the previously risky Cloud environment safe for even the most reserved environments and entities. With revolutionary transmission protocols, the time is now to consider adopting private Cloud for your transportation operations.

What New Technologies And Trends Will Shape Video Analytics?
What New Technologies And Trends Will Shape Video Analytics?

The topic of video analytics has been talked and written about for decades, and yet is still one of the cutting-edge themes in the physical security industry. Some say yesterday’s analytics systems tended to overpromise and underdeliver, and there are still some skeptics. However, newer technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) are reinvigorating the sector and enabling it to finally live up to its promise. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: What new technologies and trends will shape video analytics in 2021?