OneEvent Technologies, a startup that created a preventative analytics engine for the building monitoring and security market is introducing the OnePrevent™ system at ISC West 2017. With the unique analytics engine inside, OnePrevent does what other alarm systems cannot: predict, alert and prevent disasters before they occur. OnePrevent acts as an additional layer of security and can help industry professionals grow their business with its easy-to-install wireless system.

Cloud-based Analytical Engine

OnePrevent leverages a powerful cloud-based analytical engine that processes data collected by wireless sensors to determine what’s normal within a home or building environment. By constantly measuring environmental factors such as temperature, air quality, motion, and moisture, the deep learning analytics engine learns what is ‘normal’ over time in a specific space.

If the system receives an abnormal reading, it can determine potential risks and alert property or building managers of the possibility of a disaster, such as a fire or flood, before the event actually occurs. In UL research testing, the OnePrevent system was able to anticipate a fire up to 20 minutes before the smoke alarms went off.

OnePrevent was designed to give security dealers a preventative offering for commercial and residential installations and is the first example of the power of the OneEvent software. In addition to building a national dealer network, OneEvent will license the analytics engine with built-in machine learning algorithms – for which it holds eight U.S. patents – to manufacturers and OEMs looking to bake preventative safety into their own solutions.

OnePrevent System Features

The OneEvent gateway connects each environmental sensor to the cloud where the patented predictive analytic engine lives. The gateway receives radio transmissions from the sensors and wirelessly transmits that information to the cloud via secure cellular connection, negating the need for Wi-Fi or other wireless transmission methods. A single gateway covers an area of 10,000 sq. feet and supports over 100 sensors.   

The OneEvent gateway connects each environmental sensor to the cloud where the patented predictive analytic engine lives

The OneEvent multi-sensor smoke/temperature alarm features advanced photo-electric smoke and temperature sensing technology with highly accurate temperature detection. This UL 217 listed multi-sensor detects and sends independent gradient data to the analytics engine.

The OneEvent door/window sensors are adaptable for use as a perimeter or interior portal detector. The versatile contact sensor can be used in a variety of situations and reports its status to the cloud-based analytical engine.

The OneEvent multi-sensor presence detector supplies activity detection to the OnePrevent gateway and incorporates a humidity, temperature, and light sensor to further the OnePrevent system’s predictive sensor data.  

The OneEvent water sensor detects water and sends data to the OneEvent gateway, making it a key component in flood prevention. The detecting probe can be placed in hard-to-reach areas while keeping the transmitter unobstructed. 

Flexible System For At-risk Buildings

OnePrevent can be installed wherever buildings are at risk for destructive or dangerous events such as fire, water damage, gas leaks, or even unauthorized access

Engineered as a flexible system, OnePrevent can be installed wherever buildings are at risk for destructive or dangerous events such as fire, water damage, gas leaks, or even unauthorized access. Commercial and residential dealers alike can deploy a OnePrevent system to help building managers, property owners, or homeowners analyze and anticipate the potential for these damaging events to occur.

Installing the OnePrevent system offers dealers a unique opportunity to provide a new, innovative service that can save clients money and mitigate risk to their properties. As a supplemental, predictive-alert system, OnePrevent does not cannibalize existing business but instead works in cooperation with traditional security and fire/life safety systems. Additionally, the low barrier of entry for the system and ease of installation enables quick sales and gives dealers a viable route to RMR.

The OnePrevent solution from OneEvent will be on display at ISC West 2017 in Booth 26141 and is available now.

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