March Networks, a global renowned video security and video-based business intelligence solutions company, is pleased to announce the expansion of its Retail Solution to include fraudulent return investigations through the Zebra Savanna data intelligence platform.

March Networks’ new integration – between its Searchlight for Retail software and Doddle, which designs, develops and integrates consumer fulfilment technology – is powered by Zebra Savanna, a cloud-based platform that enables the real-time collection of data from Zebra Technologies’ sensors and devices.

March Networks Searchlight

March Networks Searchlight logs events from Zebra Savanna and other systems within the retail environment

Through this unique collaboration, March Networks Searchlight logs events from Zebra Savanna and other systems within the retail environment, like Doddle, that are powered by the Zebra platform. Searchlight can then match those events with corresponding video clips for greater enterprise-wide visibility.

For example, with the Searchlight-Doddle integration, retailers using Doddle can keep a record of all of their product returns in Searchlight. When a customer arrives in-store to return a product facilitated by Doddle’s returns technology, Searchlight records that event, allowing retailers to quickly and easily pull up the surveillance video associated with the return. This allows retailers to visually verify the details of all product returns, including the individuals involved and the condition of the product at the time of the return.

Zebra Savanna cloud-based platform

In addition, the integration also tracks other retail events such as coupon use at the point-of-sale (POS).  Retailers offering coupons through fulfillment partners like Doddle that are powered by Zebra Savanna can track the full buying cycle in Searchlight. When a customer uses a coupon, it’s recorded in Zebra Savanna and visible in Searchlight, allowing retailers to track the success of promotions offered through third-party vendors.

As more consumers turn to online channels for their retail purchases and returns, these latest Searchlight capabilities bridge the gap between digital and in-store transactions, providing retailers with complete visibility into the buying cycle,” said Jeff Corrall, Director of Strategic Partnerships and Integrations for March Networks. “According to the National Retail Federation (NRF), 11% of retail purchases are returned and an average 8% of returns are fraudulent. With Searchlight, retailers can proactively detect and target this fraud, and recoup associated losses.

Power of integrated data and video

By working with leading retail manufacturers like Zebra Technologies and fulfillment technology companies like Doddle, March Networks is proving the true power of integrated data and video, and its ability to positively impact the retail bottom line.

Returns can have an impact on retailers’ margins, especially over peak periods"

Returns can have an impact on retailers’ margins, especially over peak periods,” said Gary O’Connor, Chief Technology Officer (CTO) at Doddle. “Working with partners like March Networks means the Doddle platform can provide deeper insight. Retailers have the ability to re-convert customers through personalized digital journeys, while also having access to more capability to prevent fraud.

Integration with RFID data from Zebra sensors

March Networks’ Retail Solution is used by more than 300 retailers worldwide to facilitate improved efficiency and compliance, reduction in losses and risk management, thereby enhancing customer service and compete more successfully in the market. Searchlight is the centerpiece of the solution that helps retailers to improve performance and profitability through the integration of clear surveillance video, relevant business data, including POS transactions, and highly accurate analytics.

March Networks’ Searchlight also integrates with radio frequency identification (RFID) data from Zebra sensors and devices for enhanced product tracking, loss prevention and inventory management. March Networks will showcase the Searchlight for Retail-Doddle integration powered by Zebra Savanna in Zebra Technologies’ booth #3301 at NRF 2020: Retail’s Big Show Expo, January 12-14 in New York, NY.  

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