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We Need To Talk About Intelligent Enclosure Protection
We Need To Talk About Intelligent Enclosure Protection

Enclosures containing electronics, communications or cabling infrastructure offer a simple attack point for cyber breaches and an opportunity for a physical attack on the hardware. Yet, many of these assets are housed within enclosures that provide minimal security features to offer a deterrent to any would-be attacker. This has always just been a pet hate. Walking down the high street of a town anywhere in the United Kingdom, you can often see open street communication cabinets. You can actually look directly inside at the equipment. And if I was a bad guy, I could quite easily just put my foot into their enclosure and quite quickly take out their infrastructure. Charged service for enclosures This seems crazy when a US$ 2 magnetic contact on a door can quickly tell you whether your enclosure is open or shut, and can be vital in keeping your network alive. Moreover, the operators of these systems, whether it is telecoms or internet providers, are providing a charged service to their customers, so they should really be protecting their enclosures. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? More sobering, if you contrast this security approach to the approach taken in the data center world, an environment that already has multiple stringent security protocols in place, you get a very different picture. For instance, security devices can capture snapshots of anyone who opens a cabinet door in a data room, so it is recorded who has opened that door. While that is just one simple example, it begs the question. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? In my mind, a lot of it boils down simply to education. Network connection, easy point of cyber attacks Our preconceived idea about cyber security is some big corporation being knocked out or held to ransom by, again in our mind, someone sitting at a laptop, probably with their hood up over their head, typing away in the darkness, attacking us through the internet. But how the would-be criminal is going to come at us is just like in sport. They attack at the weakest point. Networks can be deployed in the outside world in many ways, such as cameras monitoring the highways. That means those locations will have a network connection. And that can be a point of attack in a non-secure outside world. Enclosures can be broken into by attackers Many people think, ‘That is okay because I’m going to take that ethernet device that my cameras are connected to and I’m going to put it inside an enclosure.’ However, what people do not realize is that the only thing that the enclosure is doing is protecting the ethernet device from Mother Nature. Because, without proper security, those enclosures can be broken into pretty easily. Many of them are just a single key that is not in any way coded to the device. Twofold cyber security People need to realize that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking Therein lays the problem. People need to realize that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking into the weakest physical point. And so, a simple boot through the open door of an enclosure can vandalise the devices inside and take down a small or large part of a network. And by definition, this meets the criteria for a cyber-attack. So, how do we go about tackling this problem? Well, security is a reaction marketplace. And for enclosures, there’s not, at present, a plethora of solutions out there for to counter these types of attacks. It can be challenging to find what you’re looking for through a quick Google search compared to searching for more traditional security protection measures. Deploying smart sensors and detectors But, under Vanderbilt and ComNet, we are currently taking our knowledge and experience from system installation and compiling it together. We’re bringing different products from different parts of our business to make a true solution. For instance, we have sensors for enclosures that detect anything from gas or smoke to open doors, detectors that will tell you if someone is trying to smash open your enclosure with a sledgehammer, or that someone is trying to lift your enclosure off of its mount. More importantly, as is not really a one-size-fits-all solution, we have developed a menu structure available that allows customers to pick and choose the ones that will best fit their own requirements.

We Have The Technology To Make Society Safer – How Long Can We Justify Not Using It?
We Have The Technology To Make Society Safer – How Long Can We Justify Not Using It?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organizations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centers or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognize individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analyzing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognize. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the center of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Safety In Smart Cities: How Video Surveillance Keeps Security Front And Center
Safety In Smart Cities: How Video Surveillance Keeps Security Front And Center

Urban populations are expanding rapidly around the globe, with an expected growth of 1.56 billion by 2040. As the number of people living and working in cities continues to grow, the ability to keep everyone safe is an increasing challenge. However, technology companies are developing products and solutions with these futuristic cities in mind, as the reality is closer than you may think. Solutions that can help to watch over public places and share data insights with city workers and officials are increasingly enabling smart cities to improve the experience and safety of the people who reside there. Rising scope of 5G, AI, IoT and the Cloud The main foundations that underpin smart cities are 5G, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Cloud. Each is equally important, and together, these technologies enable city officials to gather and analyze more detailed insights than ever before. For public safety in particular, having IoT and cloud systems in place will be one of the biggest factors to improving the quality of life for citizens. Smart cities have come a long way in the last few decades, but to truly make a smart city safe, real-time situational awareness and cross-agency collaboration are key areas which must be developed as a priority. Innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping center, or the main roads through towns Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping center, or the main roads through towns. From dangerous drivers to terrorist attacks, petty crime on the streets to high profile bank robberies, innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT and cloud technologies can go some way to helping respond quickly to, and in some cases even prevent, the most serious incidents. Many existing safety systems in cities rely on aging and in some places legacy technology, such as video surveillance cameras. Many of these also use on-premises systems rather than utilising the benefits of the cloud. Smart programming to deliver greater insights These issues, though not creating a major problem today, do make it more challenging for governments and councils to update their security. Changing every camera in a city is a huge undertaking, but in turn, doing so would enable all cameras to be connected to the cloud, and provide more detailed information which can be analyzed by smart programming to deliver greater insights. The physical technologies that are currently present in most urban areas lack the intelligent connectivity, interoperability and integration interfaces that smart cities need. Adopting digital technologies isn’t a luxury, but a necessity. Smart surveillance systems It enables teams to gather data from multiple sources throughout the city in real-time, and be alerted to incidents as soon as they occur. Increased connectivity and collaboration ensures that all teams that need to be aware of a situation are informed instantly. For example, a smart surveillance system can identify when a road accident has occurred. It can not only alert the nearest ambulance to attend the scene, but also the local police force to dispatch officers. An advanced system that can implement road diversions could also close roads around the incident immediately and divert traffic to other routes, keeping everyone moving and avoiding a build-up of vehicles. This is just one example: without digital systems, analyzing patterns of vehicle movements to address congestion issues could be compromised, as would the ability to build real-time crime maps and deploy data analytics which make predictive policing and more effective crowd management possible. Cloud-based technologies Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation that is needed to overcome the limitations of traditional security systems. Using these, smart cities can develop a fully open systems architecture that delivers interoperation with both local and other remote open systems. The intelligence of cloud systems can not only continue to allow for greater insights as technology develops over time, but it can do so with minimal additional infrastructure investment. Smart surveillance in the real world Mexico City has a population of almost 9 million people, but if you include the whole metropolitan area, this number rises sharply to over 21 million in total, making it one of the largest cities on the planet. Seven years ago, the city first introduced its Safe City initiative, and ever since has been developing newer and smarter ways to keep its citizens safe. In particular, its cloud-based security initiative is making a huge impact. Over the past three years, Mexico City has installed 58,000 new video surveillance cameras throughout the city, in public spaces and on transport, all of which are connected to the City’s C5 (Command, Control, Computers, Communications and Citizen Contact) facility. Smart Cities operations The solution enables officers as well as the general public to upload videos via a mobile app to share information quickly, fixed, body-worn and vehicle cameras can also be integrated to provide exceptional insight into the city’s operations. The cloud-based platform can easily be upgraded to include the latest technology innovations such as license plate reading, behavioral analysis software, video analytics and facial recognition software, which will all continue to bring down crime rates and boost response times to incidents. The right cloud approach Making the shift to cloud-based systems enables smart cities to eliminate dependence on fiber-optic connectivity and take advantage of a variety of Internet and wireless connectivity options that can significantly reduce application and communication infrastructure costs. Smart cities need to be effective in years to come, not just in the present day, or else officials have missed one of the key aspects of a truly smart city. System designers must build technology foundations now that can be easily adapted in the future to support new infrastructure as it becomes available. Open system architecture An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations For example, this could include opting for a true cloud application that can support cloud-managed local devices and automate their management. An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations and deliver additional value-add services to citizens as greater capabilities become possible in the years to come. The advances today in cloud and IoT technologies are rapid, and city officials and authorities have more options now to develop their smart cities than ever before and crucially, to use these innovations to improve public safety. New safety features Though implementing these cloud-based systems now requires investment, as new safety features are designed, there will be lower costs and challenges associated with introducing these because the basic infrastructure will already exist. Whether that’s gunshot detection or enabling the sharing of video infrastructure and data across multiple agencies in real time, smart video surveillance on cloud-based systems can bring a wealth of the new opportunities.

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New AVA & Northern Europe Study Reveals Increased Demand For Video Analytics Amongst CCTV System Owners
New AVA & Northern Europe Study Reveals Increased Demand For Video Analytics Amongst CCTV System Owners

Video Surveillance as a Service (VSaaS) innovator AVA Security found that more than four out of every five (82%) of IT, Operations, Facilities Management and Security systems decision-makers employed by medium and large-sized businesses, see a potential role for their workplaces’ video monitoring systems in supporting corporate plans for 'a safe return to the workplace post-lockdown’. Video monitoring systems This was perhaps the most significant finding of the security industry’s first multi-national study of COVID-19 video monitoring system usage and upgrade impacts. Questionnaires for this reached decision-makers during March when many of them were in the midst of making final arrangements for the safe return of staff to organizations’ offices and work premises later this summer. In the US, 90% of respondents saw a role for video monitoring systems in supporting a safe return to the office, while that percentage fell to 72% in the UK and went up to an average of 94% across Norway and Sweden. IT Cloud adoption AVA Security’s research also uncovered acceleration in cloud migration of IT services which looks set to positively impact VSaaS adoption. Nearly four out of every five US firms (79%) have already accelerated their cloud migration plans during the pandemic. More than half of those have already secured an increased IT budget in the financial year 2020/21 for moving additional services into the cloud. In the UK, over half (51%) have accelerated cloud migration of services over the last year, again with over half of those already benefitting from increased budgets to complete cloud migration projects. Sweden and Norway together had an average of 84% seeing an acceleration of cloud migration of services, with over two-thirds of this group confirming a new budget had already been assigned to this activity. VSaaS demand led by the US Over three quarters (76%) of US firms with video monitoring systems regarded VSaaS migration as a ‘net high priority’ (marking it as either ‘high priority’ or ‘somewhat a priority'). That percentage was even higher across Norway and Sweden’s respondents at 90%. However, in the UK VSaaS adoption was favored by just over half (51%) of security system decision-makers. Remote monitoring of assets AVA Security also revealed that four out of every five businesses predict an increase in remote monitoring of assets AVA Security also revealed that four out of every five businesses captured in its multi-national study, predict an increase in remote monitoring of assets, processes, and people on their work premises over the 12 months. There is no doubt that the spike in demand for remote management of systems and premises (because so many of us having to work from home) is set to continue apace: 78% of firms predicting that it was likely they would increase their remote management capability over the next 12 months. That figure was slightly higher in the US at 83% and only slightly lower in the UK at 72%. Cybersecurity AVA’s study also uncovered the fact that 79% of firms declared it likely that their organization would accelerate the migration of IT applications into the cloud over the next 12 months. The study also found that 80% of firms predicted an increased focus on cybersecurity for all networked devices and applications over the next 12 months. Vegard Aas, Head of Online Business at AVA Security, commented, “Increased demand for remote management of IT systems is naturally feeding through to demand for cloud-based IT services as those running systems focus on speed of access to data, as well as increased cybersecurity to protect network infrastructure.” Video set for deeper integration The top priority for improving and optimizing existing video monitoring systems on both sides of the Atlantic was to integrate them ‘better with other security-related systems, such as access control or alarm systems’ – nearly four of every five system owners (79%) considered this a high priority for improvement. The next highest priority (jointly), for 77% of system owners, was improving their ‘system’s resilience and backup systems and procedures and ‘GDPR compliance procedures’ surrounding their video monitoring/CCTV systems. Video analytics adoption People counting (including room capacity monitoring) is the most heavily deployed smart analytics tool right now on both sides of the Atlantic, the AVA study found. Across all four countries captured by the study, the average deployment of people counting stood at 43% of video systems. A further 32% of firms plan to deploy this video analytics capability in workplaces within the next 12 months. In the US, 54% of video system owners have already deployed people counting in their systems, whereas adoption is higher again in Norway and Sweden combined at 62%, although much lower in the UK at just 29%. Crowd density analytics People crowd density analytics runs a close second in terms of video analytics adoption People crowd density analytics runs a close second in terms of video analytics adoption, no doubt stimulated by COVID-19 safety requirements – 39% of organizations have already deployed this capability into their video surveillance systems. The US leads in terms of crowd density analytics usage with 57% of firms there using it, whereas a little less than half (44%) of Sweden and Norway-based video monitoring system owners have crowd density analytics capability. Only a quarter (26%) of UK system owners has so far deployed it. However, the UK is set to see a more than doubling of crowd density analytics deployments – 29% of system owners plan to deploy this in their video monitoring systems over the next 12 months. ANPR analytics user base Automatic License Plate Recognition (called License Plate Recognition outside the UK) has seen similar levels of deployment: 35% of system owners across all countries captured by this study have so far deployed ANPR/LPR. Sweden and Norway together lead with an average deployment of ANPR between them of 52%. In the US that number is only slightly lower at 43%. Again, the UK’s adoption of ANPR analytics lags at a quarter (25%) of system owners. ANPR analytics, the findings suggest, is set to see rapidly increased take-up, in some cases doubling in terms of market penetration over the next 12 months. So, in the US, a further 43% are set to put in LPR analytics into relevant surveillance cameras over the next 12 months, whereas in the UK an additional 22% plan to install ANPR capability into their existing CCTV systems by March 2022. Increased VSaaS adoption Our new study reveals increased take-up of remote management and cloud-based IT services Vegard Aas, Head of Online Business at AVA Security, confirmed, “Our new study reveals a plethora of changes focused on increased take-up of remote management and cloud-based IT services which all bode well for the accelerating adoption of VSaaS.” “Managers running video monitoring systems are looking for greater functionality which the next generation of video analytics can now deliver. Some specific video analytics like crowd density and room capacity analytics is enjoying a COVID-19- linked uplift in demand simultaneously.” “Security system owners are also clearly looking for the tighter cybersecurity of video data. They also want more timely access to that data from wherever they are to help drive faster and smarter decision-making.” Cloud Connector Ava Security launched its Cloud Connector offering to enable video security system owner’s easy and cost-effective transition of video security solutions to the cloud. This brings Ava’s advanced real-time analytics and proactive security to existing surveillance cameras by integrating with the open Aware Cloud platform.

Looking Back At 2020: Security Mergers And Acquisitions Continue Despite COVID-19
Looking Back At 2020: Security Mergers And Acquisitions Continue Despite COVID-19

Consolidation continued in the physical security marketplace in the turbulent year 2020. There were several mega-deals in addition to shuffling among small and medium-sized companies. Here is a sampling of M&A from this year, compiled from our archive of company news. With the changing economic climate, how much more is ahead in 2021? Stay tuned. Wesco merges with Anixter WESCO International, Inc., a provider of business-to-business (B2B) distribution, logistics services and supply chain solutions, announced it completed its merger with Anixter International Inc., creating a premier, global B2B distribution and supply chain solutions company. Anixter becomes a wholly owned subsidiary of WESCO International. ACRE acquires Razberi ACRE acquired Razberi Technologies, Farmers Branch, Texas, and the product line of intelligent video appliances, automated security software and health monitoring software will be added to and sold under the ComNet brand and portfolio of products. ComNet will now be selling Razberi products through its established channels. Motorola acquires IndigoVision Among the benefits is enhanced geographical reach across a wider customer base Motorola Solutions says the IndigoVision range of products, global presence and customer base are ‘highly complementary’ to Motorola Solutions' existing presence in video security. Among the benefits is enhanced geographical reach across a wider customer base. Motorola acquires Pelco “Pelco’s track record of innovation, internationally recognized brand, global channel and customer installed base enable us to further expand our global footprint with enterprise and public safety customers,” said Greg Brown, Motorola Solutions’ Chairman and CEO, about the iconic brand. Johnson Controls swallows Qolsys Qolsys Inc., residential and commercial security and smart-home manufacturer, enhances Johnson Controls global innovation platform, delivering next generation security and smart building solutions. JCI had already owned a majority stake in the company since 2014. ADT and Google Home partnership The partnership will combine Nest’s award-winning hardware and services, powered by Google’s machine learning technology, with ADT’s installation, service and professional monitoring network to create a more helpful smart home and integrated experience for customers across the United States. Upon the closing of Google’s equity investment in ADT, Google will own 6.6% of ADT’s outstanding aggregate common equity. Securitas acquires STANLEY in Five Countries The acquisition is aligned with Securitas’ ambition to double the size of its security solutions Securitas acquired STANLEY Security’s electronic security businesses in Germany, Portugal, Switzerland, Singapore and India. The acquisition is aligned with Securitas’ ambition to double the size of its security solutions and electronic security business and expands Securitas’ electronic security footprint and capabilities. Allied Universal to Buy G4S Ending the year on a high note, the boards of directors managing Allied Universal and G4S reached an agreement on the terms of a recommended cash offer. The deal brings to a close a six-month bidding war for G4S. The combined business is expected to generate approximately $18 billion in annual revenues with a global workforce of more than 750,000 people in 85 countries. Quantum acquires Western Digital business line Quantum Corporation entered into an agreement with Western Digital Technologies, Inc., a subsidiary of Western Digital Corp., to acquire its ActiveScale object storage business. The acquisition demonstrates Quantum’s commitment to innovation and growth, extending the company’s leadership role in storing and managing video and unstructured data using a software-defined approach. AVA/Vaion/Jazz Networks Ava, a unified security company, announced the completion of the merger between Jazz Networks, renowned cyber security insider threat detection and response firm; and Vaion, an end-to-end video security solutions provider. Ava is now positioned to deliver unified cyber and physical security solutions to organizations worldwide.

How Fury Motors Took Control with Ava Aware and Global Axiom’s Remote Monitoring Service
How Fury Motors Took Control with Ava Aware and Global Axiom’s Remote Monitoring Service

Fury Motors has served the St. Paul, Minnesota area for more than 50 years. Founded in 1963 as a family-owned and operated business, the dealership offers the community a diversified mix of vehicles and services including new and pre-owned vehicles, financing, auto repair, and maintenance. Currently, the dealership employs 115 people locally and is a one-stop-shop for all things automotive and trusted by the community. Committed to offering quality new and used vehicles for every taste and need, Fury Motors maintains a large and complete inventory of new Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep vehicles. With more than $50M in inventory on a 10-acre lot, security has taken on a whole new level of importance since the dealership was founded. Challenges faced With the face of retail ever-evolving, challenges commonplace for auto dealerships have not only intensified but evolved, too. The safety and security of employees, customers, and assets have taken on a whole new meaning-making visibility into daily operations, not just important but critical to business success. Now more than ever businesses require flexibility, agility, and adaptability in their business solutions. This is particularly evident when it comes to solving security challenges. Fury Motors is no exception. The dealership realized simply recording security events as they happened was no longer enough. It needed to take a proactive stance on protecting its assets. Security of assets and operations To provide perspective, Fury Motors’ video security system required constant monitoring to capture events that were time and cost-prohibitive even with a monitoring company. And, if they could afford to have someone watch the cameras 24x7, human observations are subject to error or oversight. Fury Motors relies on remote monitoring to protect its inventory and capture valuable insight As a result, most video footage was never viewed or put to practical use, so Fury Motors was missing valuable information that could improve the security of assets and its operations. With no guard on-site, Fury Motors relies on remote monitoring to protect its inventory as well as capture valuable insight into employee behavior and customer service practices. When the dealership turned to Global Axiom and Ava, a unified security company, it was losing $7K+ a month to internal theft and operational inefficiency above and beyond losses and damage to inventory. Global Axiom Remote Monitoring powered by Ava Aware Fury Motors realized that it could and should get more value from its remote monitoring service including its intelligent video security system and footage. The dealership turned to Global Axiom for a monitoring service coupled with Ava Aware to provide the perfect solution to stay a step ahead of criminals and potential losses. And even more importantly, it gives Fury Motors the data intelligence to take business operations to a whole new level with greater efficiency and resource optimization. Fury Motors needed a new approach to security. Specifically, a system to capture, analyze, and present the big picture data. Everything from monitoring people and assets on the outdoor car lots to technicians doing oil changes in the service bay to the handling of incoming parts and inventory after hours. Video monitoring solution Combination of Global Axiom’s remote monitoring expertise and Ava Aware technology is unprecedented The dealership’s new intelligent video monitoring solution uses artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning bringing a new level of agility and flexibility to monitoring services allowing Fury Motors’ security operators to quickly review footage from past incidents, increase situational awareness and respond time to evolving situations, and capture trend data for developing strategies and making data-driven decisions to prevent future problems. The combination of Global Axiom’s remote monitoring expertise and powerful Ava Aware technology is unprecedented. Ava Aware allows Fury Motors to accelerate investigations by searching objects and events of interest with speed and precision. Critical when managing $50M+ in inventory. Four important Ava differentiators  Proactive threat detection Ava’s intelligent algorithms and self-learning detect abnormal behavior in specific Fury Motors scenarios and alerts operators in real-time. It intelligently highlights what’s truly relevant from all Fury Motors’ cameras, in real-time, all the time. Powerful search using machine learning Fury Motors is now able to search by event and similarity to perform appearance and image detection powered by machine learning capabilities. The dealership is now able to comb through countless hours of video in seconds. Critical in pre-empting theft and invaluable in managing operational efficiency. Directional audio analytics Fury Motors’ dealership is expansive with $50M in inventory on-site. The dealership needed a solution like Ava Aware to provide 360-degree coverage with Ava’s innovative acoustic sensors. The cameras identify specific sound patterns to determine the type of sound and its direction, and sends instant alerts to the Ava Aware video management system, providing Fury Motors’ security operators with a complete overview of the surroundings. Enhanced business and operational insights Fury Motors security and operations teams now have more situational awareness and insights. The dealership can monitor and count people and vehicles, watch smart maps to understand hot spots or high traffic areas to manage occupancy and shift scheduling, and ultimately, improve customer service. Improved operational efficiency Fury Motors is positioned to carry on for another 50+ years as a leader in the St. Paul, Minnesota market. Management team is able to review past events, respond to changes in real-time, and enhance operational efficiency with real data With its new improved monitoring service powered by analytics, the dealership’s management team is able to both review relevant past events but more importantly, proactively respond to situational changes in any environment via real-time alerts to prevent situations from occurring. Similarly, management is able to improve operational efficiency with real data. Ava’s technology Ava’s mobile technology allows investigators to immediately search footage across multiple video cameras from the field to decrease the time-to-target and save hours of investigation and suspect-tracking. Again, creating significant operational efficiencies and increasing the likelihood to prevent and/or recover lost assets. Video analytics Video analytics has also allowed Fury Motors to create customized alerts allowing the dealership to take a proactive and preventative response to a variety of problems. This need gained significance in the wake of health and safety guidelines put in place for COVID-19 and since has allowed Fury Motors to improve customer service by being more in tune with employee response times to customers on the lot. Data analytics The ability to detect both patterns and anomalies using Ava’s powerful data analytics is empowering Fury Motors to enforce compliance and respond to important company mandates in the short term while improving operations and protecting employees and customers in the long-term. Win-Win partnership “The Ava Aware solution combined with the Global Axiom remote monitoring service has been a tremendous win. Not only have our losses been eliminated but more importantly the headaches around dealing with those losses are gone as well. Our goal is for our customers to feel safe on our lot no matter when they choose to shop. They should feel comfortable that if they drop their car off for service or trust us with it for repair we will keep it safe. The Ava / Global Axiom solution provides this level of service and allows us to stay focused on serving our customers,” Fury Motor’s Owner, Tom Leonard.

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