On November 2019 in Stockton, California, surveillance footage found that vandals shot out glass windows and doors in many places in a small business complex (FOX40). The intruders broke in only to leave with nothing, proving their intent was solely to vandalize the property. Meanwhile, it was reported that a trio of ATM thieves struck around 9 times across many different locations inside Brooklyn and Queens within just over a month in fall 2019 (ATM Marketplace).

On average, the cost of vandalism to SMB is around $3,370 per incident (US Small Business Administration), including a staggering 692 vehicle vandalism claims per day. Likewise, the average cost of theft to SMB is about $300 per shoplifting incident and $1,500 per employee theft incident, which accounts for 38% and 34.5% of all theft instances, respectively (National Retail Security Survey).

High-performance artificial intelligent systems can automate the monitoring tasks

Vandalism and theft have proven time and time again to be inconvenient and deconstructively harmful towards SMB. However, these financial burdens can be prevented with the use of the right security system. AI-based security systems with Deep Learning contain many features that many SMB owners find advantageous in their pursuit to stop unwarranted and unwanted money loss.  

Intrusion and loitering detection

The first of many features that can help with vandalism and theft prevention is Intrusion Detection. High-performance artificial intelligent systems can automate the monitoring tasks for high-risk sites to provide a high level of security and security personnel monitoring efficiency. Traditional intrusion detection systems detect objects based on size and location, but they do not recognize the type of objects.

Now, Intrusion Detection (Perimeter Protection) systems with cutting-edge, built-in AI algorithms to recognize a plethora of different object types, can distinguish objects of interest, thus significantly decreases the false-positive intrusion rate. The more advanced AI-based systems, like those we offered at IronYun, enable the users to draw ROIs based on break-in points, areas of high-valuables, and any other preference to where alerts may be beneficial.

Similarly, AI Loitering Detection can be used to receive alerts on suspicious activity outside any given store. The loitering time and region of interest are customizable in particular systems, which allows for a range of detection options. Advanced loitering detection software as such can detect and trigger real-time alerts for both people loitering and/or vehicles that are illegally parked in certain areas of interest. A benefit, which only certain advanced systems contain, is the ability to send trigger actions to 3rd-party systems in reaction to receiving an alert of loitering and/or intrusion detection. These trigger actions can be set to contact authorities immediately and/or trigger a scare tactic alarm or announcement to intruder/loiterer.

The loitering time and region of interest are customisable in particular systems, which allows for a range of detection options
Certain Face Recognition and License Plate Recognition software can record individual people/vehicles

Face and license plate recognition

In addition to the activity detection solutions, certain Face Recognition and License Plate Recognition software can record individual people/vehicles and use pre-configured lists to identify particular faces or plates that may be of interest, such as those in watchlists. These systems can also enable the users to upload images of faces not in the lists and search for them in the camera recording. For instance, if a person is detected several times loitering outside a store, one may save one of the detection photos into the watchlist, and set up an alert when said face is recognized again outside the building in the future. The alerts will help to deter and prevent vandalism or theft, and notify the authorities to the scene before the troublemaker completes the act. The main attributes of high-performance Face Recognition systems which maximize assistance with vandalism and theft management include:

  • Face match rate > 90% with good camera angles and lighting.
  • Processing multiple streams and multiple faces per image.
  • Live face extraction and matching to databases of thousands of faces within 3 seconds.                                                                                                               

State-of-the-art AI security software with Deep Learning allows the user to no longer need to install special LPR cameras

 

 

If the watchlist individual is wearing a mask or their face is not in view of the camera, their license plate may be a good indicator. If a particular car is detected several times loitering in the parking lot or street outside a store, the user can set the alerts for such car to get notified in the future. With an AI solution like this, common street cameras should be equipped with LPR capabilities. So, state-of-the-art AI security software with Deep Learning allows the user to no longer need to install special LPR cameras.

high-performance alert mechanisms

A high-performance AI solution, in addition to having high accuracy, should be able to:

  • Easily integrate with 3rd-party systems
  • Work well with all ONVIF IP cameras including infrared and thermal ones (for Intrusion detection)
  • Analyzes video streams in real time and trigger alerts within a few seconds
  • Send alerts to multiple VMSs, connect with signaling devices such as loud speakers or flashing lights
  • Send email notifications to security staff and police departments
  • Send notification on mobile device using AI NVR mobile app
  • Maintains a record of all alerts to provide evidence of intrusion and loitering instances for police and insurance agencies.

To assist in theft and vandalism prevention, AI-based security systems with deep learning will do all of the tedious work for you. Their low cost and high performance also make them the most accessible security solutions in the market with large return on investment. Stopping crimes is a difficult, ongoing challenge, but with the right AI software, business vendors and police departments can do so with more ease.

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Jacob Gannon Marketing Specialist, IronYun

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